Metacomet-Monadnock-Mattabesett Trail Study Act of 2002

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    107TH UNITED STATES CONGRESS
    2ND SESSION


    An Act
    To amend the National Trails System Act to designate the Metacomet-Monadnock-Mattabesett Trail extending through western Massachusetts and central Connecticut for study for potential addition to the National Trails System.


    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

    SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.[edit]

    This Act may be cited as the ``Metacomet-Monadnock-Mattabesett Trail Study Act of 2002''.

    SEC. 2. DESIGNATION OF METACOMET-MONADNOCK-MATTABESETT TRAIL FOR STUDY FOR POTENTIAL ADDITION TO THE NATIONAL TRAILS SYSTEM.[edit]

    Section 5(c) of the National Trails System Act (16 U.S.C. 1244(c)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
    ``(____) Metacomet-Monadnock-Mattabesett Trail.—The Metacomet-Monadnock-Mattabesett Trail, a system of trails and potential trails extending southward approximately 180 miles through western Massachusetts on the Metacomet-Monadnock Trail, across central Connecticut on the Metacomet Trail and the Mattabesett Trail, and ending at Long Island Sound.''.

    SEC. 3. EXPEDITED REPORT TO CONGRESS.[edit]

    Notwithstanding the fourth sentence of section 5(b) of the National Trails System Act (16 U.S.C. 1244(b)), the Secretary of the Interior shall submit the study required by the amendment made by section 2 to Congress not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

    Approved December 16, 2002.

    Legislative History[edit]

    H.R. 1814:

    HOUSE REPORTS: No. 107-224 (Comm. on Resources).
    SENATE REPORTS: No. 107-263 (Comm. on Energy and Natural Resources).
    CONGRESSIONAL RECORD:
    • Vol. 147 (2001):
      • Oct. 23, considered and passed House.
    • Vol. 148 (2002):
      • Nov. 19, considered and passed Senate.
    This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).