United Nations Security Council Resolution 114

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 114
by the United Nations

Adopted unanimously by the Security Council at its 728nd meeting, on 4 June 1956

The Security Council,

Recalling its resolutions 113 (1956) of 4 April 1956 and 73 (1949) of 11 August 1949,

Having received the report of the Secretary-General on his recent mission on behalf of the Security Council [1],

Noting those passages of the report (section III and annexes 1-4) which refer to the assurances given to the Secretary-General by all the parties to the General Armistice Agreements [2] unconditionally to observe the cease-fire,

Noting also that progress has been made towards the adoption of the specific measures set out in paragraph 3 of resolution 113 (1956),

Noting, however, that full compliance with the General Armistice Agreements and with Council resolutions 107 (1955) of 30 March 1955, 108 (1955) of 8 September 1955 and 111 (1956) of 19 January 1956 is not yet effected, and that the measures called for in paragraph 3 of resolution 113 (1956) have been neither completely agreed upon nor put fully into effect,

Believing that further progress should now be made in consolidating the gains resulting from the Secretary-General's mission and towards full implementation by the parties of the Armistice Agreements,

1. Commends the Secretary-General and the parties on the progress already achieved;

2. Declares that the parties to the Armistice Agreements should speedily carry out the measures already agreed upon with the Secretary-General, and should cooperate with the Secretary-General and the Chief of Staff of the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization in Palestine to put into effect their further practical proposals, pursuant to resolution 113 (1956), with a view to full implementation of that resolution and full compliance with the Armistice Agreements;

3. Declares that full freedom of movement of United Nations observers must be respected along the armistice demarcation lines, in the demilitarized zones and in the defensive areas, as defined in the Armistice Agreements, to enable theme to fulfil their functions;

4. Endorses the Secretary-General's view that the re-establishment of full compliance with the Armistice Agreements represents a stage which has to be passed in order to make progress possible on the main issues between the parties;

5. Requests the Chief of Staff to contine to carry out his observation of the cease-fire pursuant to resolution 73 (1949) and to report to Security-Council whenever any action undertaken by one party to an Armistice Agreement constitutes a serious violation of that Agreement or of the cease-fire, which in his opinion requires immediate consideration by the Council;

6. Calls upon the parties to the Armistice Agreements to take the steps necessary to carry out the present resolution, thereby increasing confidence and demonstrating their wish for peaceful conditions;

7. Requests the Secretary-General to continue his good offices with the parties, with a view to full implementation of resolution 113 (1956) and full compliance with the Armistice Agreements, and to report to the Security Council as appropriate.


[1] Ibid., Eleventh Year, Supplement for April, May and June 1956, document S/3596.

[2] See Official Records of Security Council, Fourth Year, Special Supplements Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4.

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