United States patent 849136

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

DANIEL KOPS, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

CORSET.

N0, 849,136.   Specification of Letters Patent.   Patented April 2, 1907.

Application filed October 16, 1906.   Serial No. 339,151,

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, DANIEL KOPS, a citizen of the United States, residing at the borough of Manhattan, city, county, and State of New York, have invented an Improvement in Corsets, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the construction of a corset of comparatively thin material, which by preference has at least one edge and possibly both edges finished and formed of Swiss embroidery, and said edges do not require binding or other finishing than that produced in the manufacture of the Swiss embroidery: and my invention further relates to the manner of connecting up the sections of this thin fabric body to provide not only the requisite strength above and below the waist, but at the waist-line, it being a fact that difficulties have heretofore been experienced in the manufacture of corsets of thin material not only in the matter of the sewed lines of union, but in the matter of ornamentation.

In the device of my invention I employ the thin Swiss-embroidery material, which is a well-known article of manufacture, and I form the fabric body of the corset with a series of connecting fabric sections above the waist-line, that are formed from this Swissembroidery material, and a second series of connecting fabric sections below the waistline, which are formed from similar thin material or may also be formed from the same Swiss-embroidery material, and I join these sections along the waist-line at the line of the usual waist-strip, said waist-line of connection extending from the front around to the back of the corset. The various fabric sections above arid below the waist-line are joined in lines that may and preferably do become the center lines of the bone-pockets, so that the support of the bone-pockets is lent to the sewed union of the said sections.

I take a suitable length of the thin Swiss-embroidery material having an embroidered straight edge and mark thereon the parts or sections of the corset of the desired proportions and shape and thereafter connect the fabric sections formed therefrom so that the embroidered or embroidered scalloped edge thereof constitutes the edge of the corset, the said embroidered edge constituting one edge of each part or section. This is done without trimming or cutting the fabric along said edge or binding the same, and this condition

maintains whether both upper or lower edges of the corset or or only one edge are formed from this thin embroidery fabric. I prefer to cut up the length of embroidery material on the marked lines of the parts or sections and join them by sewed lines of union, and the collated upper and lower parts are shaped and connected along the waist-line by sewed lines of union.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is an elevation of the upper portion of one-half of the corset of my invention spread out flat, the same terminating slightly below the waist-line. Fig. 2 is an elevation of the lower portion of onehalf of the corset of my invention, termin ating

slightly above the waist-line.   Figs. 3 and 4, in larger size, are sectional views at the dotted lines x x and y y, respectively, of Fig. 1; and Fig. 5 represents a suitable length of embroidery material with the various parts or sections of one half of a corset marked thereon, the parts for the other half being the reversed duplicate thereof.

a represents the fabric sections above the waist-line, and a' the ornamental or embroidered edge of the sections a, which edge is shown as scalloped and constitutes the edge of the corset following the desired contour without trimming or cutting the fabric or binding the same.

b represents the waist-line, and d the usual waist-strip upon the under surface of the fabric sections extending from the front around to the back of the corset, the said waist-line throughout its continuity being substantially central of the strip d.

c represents the fabric sections below the waist-line. These sections are formed of similar material to the fabric-sections a. They may be embroidered or ornamented with an edge c' (shown in Fig. 2) and which is like and agrees with the ornamented edge a' at the top of the corset, or these fabricsections c may be finished With a plain bound edge c2, which is also shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings, for I do not limit my invention as applied to the lower edge of the corset by an ornamental edge or a plain bound edgeonly to the ornamental edge a' at the top of the corset.

The fabric sections a and also the fabric sections c above and below the waist-line are joined in lines of sewing, 2 being the lines of sewing of the fabric sections a, and 3 being the lines of sewing of the fabric sections c, and these lines of union are shown as and become the center lines of the pairs of bonepockets e, it being a fact that when the bonepockets, which are of usual construction, are sewed to these fabric sections they are so placed that the lines 2 3 of sewing of the sections come at the center of the pairs of bonepockets between the bones, so that the edges of these sections are not only joined by lines of sewing, but are sewed down to the bonepockets by other closely-parallel lines of sewing, so that the support of the bonepockets is lent to the sewed unions of the said sections, and these sections are so arranged that in most cases these lines of sewing 2 3 and union of the sections are in line with one another at the upper and lower sections of the corset, although I do not limit myself in this respect.

The drawings illustrate the contour of the embroidered edge, which shows the upper portion of the corset made of the Swiss-embroidery material. It shows the lower edge as either similarly made or as bound with an ordinary binding-strip. In Fig. 5 I have shown a length of fabric material h, having an embroidered straight edge, with the parts or sections i, which edge to edge go to make up one-half of the corset marked thereon, from which their inclined or right-angular relation to the embroidered edge will be apparent.   It will also be apparent, that these parts or sections are so proportioned and laid out that said embroidered edge constitutes one edge of the corset, and the aggregate of said embroidered edges constitute the finished edge of the corset.   It will also be apparent that when these parts or sections are finished with definite outer edges that the inner edges are more or less irregular and require trimming before they can be joined throughout the waist-line b with the waist-strip d by sewed lines of union.

In my improved manner of constructing the corset of thin material the lines of union of the sections and the support therefor are really of greater strength or fully of as great strength as the material itself of the sections

between the bone-pockets.   Therefore there is no greater tendency of the lines of union breaking or separating than there is of the fabric itself giving out.

I claim as my invention--

1. A corset comprising in both the upper and lower parts series of fabric sections cut from a length of fabric material, having an embroidered straight edge and the sections so proportioned that said embroidered edge constitutes one edge of each section, the embroidered edges constituting the finished edge of the corset and said sections united throughout the waist-line by a sewed union.

2. A corset comprising upper and lower series of fabric sections united throughout the waist-line by sewed lines of union and at least one of said series of fabric sections cut from a length of fabric material, having an embroidered straight edge and the sections so proportioned that the said embroidered edge constitutes the edge of the corset.

3. A corset formed from a length of fabric material, having an embroidered straight edge with shaped parts joined together by sewed lines of union, said embroidered edge constituting one edge of each part and the said embroidered edges constituting one finished edge of the corset and the respective parts united throughout the waist-line by a sewed union.

4. A corset formed from a length of fabric material, the opposite straight finished edges of which constitute the respective top and bottom edges of the corset and said strip severed lengthwise between said edges and the respective divisions of the corset united by sewed lines of union and formed from said parts which are shaped and united along the waist-line by sewed lines of union.

Signed by me this 5th day of October, 1906.

DANIEL KOPS.

Witnesses:

GEO. T. PINCKNEY, E. ZACHARIASEN.