User:Doug/html

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HTML is important to proper control of formats. Templates often incorporate deprecated HTML and templates are not easily portable interwiki for users working in multiple subdomains. For example, if a bi-lingual work is transcribed at en.ws and later the non-english pages are to be moved to their proper subdomain, templates may not function. Additionally, works transcribed in two different subdomains may have alternating pages formatted differently do to templates not existing or having different code on the different subdomains. Most importantly, when working in other language subdomains, the template is often difficult to find. The correct template may not exist, may not be interwiki language linked, or may behave differently and average users may not be able to sort out the problem. On the other hand, templates are simple to use and take up a lot less space than html. They make it easier to read a page in edit mode and make coding html and css more intuitive and easier to break into.

I suggest that wherever html can be use reasonably simply, and without dependence on subdomain specific common.css (otherwise the cross-domain portability is lost), it should be used. For this reason, I am collecting below some of the basic codes to use and their variations:

center[edit]

<div style="text-align:center"> text </div>  :not equivalent to {{center}} which contains class="tiInherit" and places the divs on different lines causing padding the centered text vertically.

small caps[edit]

<div sytle="font-variant:small-caps"> text </div>  :generally equivalent to {{smallcaps}} but nesting the div within a template will fail.

horizontal rule[edit]

a short thick black line: <hr style="margin:auto; background-color:#000; color:#000; width:3em; height:5px">

Superscript[edit]

Hello<span style="vertical-align:super;font-size:x-small;">to</span> produces: Helloto

Subscript[edit]

Hello<span style="vertical-align:sub;font-size:x-small;">to</span> produces: Helloto

Italics[edit]

(for use when there are line breaks such as in a poem, such that ''foo'' is ineffective or inefficient): <div style="font-style:italic">quas interdum consului, maxime de formis nominum, quamquam etiam in illis valde variantur.—In commentario critico, ne inutili onere laboraret, paucas scripturas vel scripturarum correctiones, quas prorsus nullius momenti esse mihi persuasum erat, quamquam diligenter enotatas habeo, consulto omisi.

In orthographia A sequor, si nihil aliud adnotatur. Libelli inscriptionem et capitum. numeros addidi</div>

produces:

quas interdum consului, maxime de formis nominum, quamquam etiam in illis valde variantur.—In commentario critico, ne inutili onere laboraret, paucas scripturas vel scripturarum correctiones, quas prorsus nullius momenti esse mihi persuasum erat, quamquam diligenter enotatas habeo, consulto omisi. In orthographia A sequor, si nihil aliud adnotatur. Libelli inscriptionem et capitum. numeros addidi.

Bold[edit]

(as for italics) <div style="font-weight:bold">Foo</div>

Foo

Dashes and hyphens and the like[edit]

While not technically html, this is a unicode reference list that I previously posted at User talk:LiniShu:
A "modern-day keyboard dash" is hyphen-minus and should not generally be used for a dash of any kind, it may be used as a hyphen or a minus sign, though in theory, the more precise characters are preferable and it has the wrong vertical placement for a proper minus sign:

  1. em dash
  2. en dash
  3. minus sign (looks very similar to an en dash but technically isn't)
  4. figure dash (although this may appear to be the same width as the en dash, its size depends on the width of digits, whereas an en dash should be ½ em wide. More importantly, they have a different purpose)
  5. - hyphen-minus (which is what you get on the keyboard normally when you shift the underscore)
  6. hyphen

There are also non-breaking hyphens (U+2011), horizontal bars (U+2015), etc.


References[edit]

</references>