Where are you Going My Pretty Maid

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Where Are You Going My Pretty Maid
Traditional folk song or nursery rhyme known in the United Kingdom. A longer and a shorter version exist, as does a very similar song.

Where are you going, my pretty maid?
I'm going a milking, sir, she said.
May I go with you, my pretty maid?
You're kindly welcome, sir, she said.
What is your father, my pretty maid?
My father's a farmer, sir, she said.
What is your fortune, my pretty maid?
My face is my fortune, sir, she said.
Then I won't marry you, my pretty maid.
Nobody asked you, sir, she said.

Longer version[edit]

This longer version appeared in A Baby's Opera by Walter Crane in 1877.[1]

1. "Where are you going to, my pretty maid?
Where are you going to, my pretty maid?"
"I'm going a-milking, Sir," she said,
"Sir," she said, "Sir," she said,
"I'm going a-milking, Sir," she said.

2. "Shall I go with you, my pretty maid?"
"Yes, if you please, kind Sir," she said,
"Sir," she said, "Sir," she said,
"Yes, if you please, kind Sir," she said.

3. "What is your fortune, my pretty maid?"
"My face is my fortune, Sir," she said,
"Sir," she said, "Sir," she said,
"My face is my fortune, Sir," she said.

4. "Then I can't marry you, my pretty maid."
"Nobody asked you, Sir," she said,
"Sir," she said, "Sir," she said,
"Nobody asked you, Sir," she said.

Dabbling in the Dew[edit]

A similar song is known as Dabbling in the Dew.

'O where are you going, my pretty maid,
With your red rosy cheeks and your coal black hair?'
'I'm going a-milking, sir,' she said;
'And it's dabbling in the dew makes the milkmaids fair.'
'May I go with you, my pretty maid,
With your red rosy cheeks?' etc.
'O you may go with me, sir,' she said;
'And it's dabbling,' etc.
'I, may I marry you, my pretty maid,
With your red rosy cheeks?' etc.
'Wait till you're wanted, sir,' she said;
'And it's dabbling,' etc.


References[edit]