Zoological Illustrations/VolII-Pl113

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Zoological Illustrations
by William Swainson
Vol II. Pl. 113. Mitra pertusa. Cardinal Mitre.
Zoological Illustrations Volume II Plate 113.jpg

MITRA pertusa. var.

Cardinal Mitrelarge spotted variety.

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Generic Character.—See Pl. 23.


Specific Character.

M. sect. 3. Testâ ovato-acutâ, albâ; striis transversis puncticulatis ornatâ, anfractu basali crasso, tesseris parvis plurimis spadiceis vittato, tesserisque majoribus bifasciato; labio exteriore denticulato.
M. Shell ovate-acute, white, with transverse punctured striæ; the basal whorl thick, with numerous bands consisting of small, and two of large tessellated spots; outer lip toothed.
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Much uncertainty exists respecting the shell which Linnæus intended for his Voluta pertusa, owing to the inaccuracy of the synonyms, which refer to species widely different from each other; the majority of authors have, however, considered it to be the shell figured by Born and Martini, under that name, and recently by myself in Exotic Conchology. As a species, it is principally distinguished by the rows of irregular brown spots which are always disposed in transverse bands, running into larger blotches adjoining the suture, and near the base of the body whorl, which is thick and obtuse; the lesser spots are mostly tessellated or quadrangular, but in size they vary considerably in different individuals, and even in the same shell; this has induced Lamarck to separate them into two species, but which, for reasons to be hereafter given, appears to me unnecessary.

The variety here figured is very rare, nor have I seen more than two examples; it differs only from the usual varieties in having the spots remarkably large. In a future plate this species will be further illustrated, and the correct synonyms of all the varieties then given. Inhabits various parts of the Asiatic ocean.