Zoological Illustrations/VolIII-Pl161

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Zoological Illustrations
by William Swainson
Vol III. Pl. 161. Voluta punctata. Red-dotted Volute.
Zoological Illustrations Volume III Plate 161.jpg

VOLUTA punctata,

Red-dotted Volute.

Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Flare Centre - 22px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg

Generic Character.

Testa ovata. Spira aperturâ brevior, apice papillari. Basis truncata, emarginata. Columella plicata, plicis inferioribus majoribus.
Shell ovate. Spire shorter than the aperture, the tip papillary. Base truncated, emarginate. Pillar plaited, the inferior plaits generally largest.
Generic Types. Volutæ Olla, Imperialis, Pacifica, &c.

Specific Character.

V. testâ ovatâ, subfusiformi, tuberculatâ, pallidè rubellâ fasciis 2 maculatis, rubris, punctis minutis interstinctis; columellâ 4 plicatâ.
Shell ovate, subfusiform, tuberculated, flesh-coloured, with two bands of red spots interspersed with minute dots; pillar 4 plaited.
Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Flare Centre - 22px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg

In "Exotic Conchology," I have commenced, and intend to complete, a copious illustration of this noble family of shells; which (if the simile be admissible) may be termed the nobles of testaceous animals, with as much truth as Linnæus has called Palms the princes of the vegetable world. The Volutes, indeed, are imposing shells; both from their size, rarity, and their rich (but not gaudy) colouring; and it is not improbable that the value of a choice collection of the principal species, would be equal to their own weight in solid gold.

The species now under consideration is only known from an injured specimen in Mr. Dubois' cabinet; although much rubbed on one side, it presents on the other a true pattern of its original markings; the margin of the outer lip, and the tip of the spire, are both injured; yet, notwithstanding these defects, there are abundant characters remaining to evince its total dissimilarity from any other recorded species.

I have preferred subjoining only the essential generic characters of this genus, as most intelligible to students; particularly as its natural characters are fully detailed in the first part of "Exotic Conchology."