A Companion and Useful Guide to the Beauties of Scotland

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A COMPANION,

AND

USEFUL GUIDE

TO THE

BEAUTIES OF SCOTLAND,

TO

THE LAKES

OF

WESTMORELAND, CUMBERLAND, AND
LANCASHIRE;

AND TO THE CURIOSITIES IN

THE DISTRICT OF CRAVEN,

IN THE WEST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE.

TO WHICH IS ADDED, A MORE PARTICULAR

DESCRIPTION OF SCOTLAND,

ESPECIALLY THAT PART OF IT, CALLED

THE HIGHLANDS.


BY THE HON. MRS. MURRAY,

OF KENSINGTON.


LONDON:


PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR;
AND SOLD BY GEORGE NICOL, BOOKSELLER TO HIS
MAJESTY, PALL-MALL.
1799


ADVERTISEMENT

TO THE READER.




THIS Guide points out to the Traveller what is worth noticing in his Tour, with the distances from place to place; mentions the Inns on the road, whether good or bad; also what state the Roads are in; and informs him of those fit for a carriage, and those where it cannot go, with safety. In these respects, the present Work differs from any other Publication of the kind: for no writer of Tours has hitherto taken the trouble of ascertaining what may be seen, worthy of notice, in the course of a Traveller's journey: and it very often happens that he passes within a mile, or less, of very great Natural Beauties, without either knowing or having heard of them; and the country people seldom or ever name to strangers what they think nothing of; because, seeing them every day, they regard them not as objects of admiration.

TO THE:

MANAGERS OF THE LITERARY

REVIEWS.


 Gentlemen,
I am an Author, neither for fame (my subject being too common a one to gain it), nor for bread. I do not publish from the persuasion of friends, or to please myself I write because I think my Guide will be really useful to adventurers, who may follow my steps through Scotland, and to the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Lancashire; by informing them of those objects which are worthy of notice, and at the same time acquainting them where, and by what means they can get at them in the safest and most comfortable manner. A plan, I believe, never attended to (in the way I have done) by any of my predecessors in Tour writing. I have no wings to soar Parnassus' height;—no talents to tread the wild path of imagination;—but having (as the great Frederick termed it,[1]) a little of "ce gros bon sens qui court les rues;" I am able to relate, in my own fashion, what my eyes have seen. But you, Gentlemen, frighten me.—Should you discover faults, and faults in abundance I fear there are, be generous, as the mastiff is to the babbling lap-dog, who looks with calm dignity at the Lilliputian, passes on, and takes no notice: so that if your consciences will not permit you to give me a word of encouragement, I entreat you to be silent. On the contrary, should my child be thought in the least worthy of your approbation, I shall rejoice, and ever think myself, obliged to you.

I am, Gentlemen,

 with great respect,

your most obedient humble Servant,

S. MURRAY,

 Kensington,
March the 30th, 1799,

  1. The King of Prussia, talking to a Frenchman, said, "You Frenchmen—you possess imagination; the English, it is said, depth; and we dullness, with ce gros bon sens qui court les rues."


THE CONTENTS.




A Guide to the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmoreland, Lancashire; and to the Curiosities of the West Riding of Yorkshire; particularly the District called Craven, in Yorkshire. page 1


A Guide to the Beauties of Scotland. p. 37


A DESCRIPTION OF PART OF SCOTLAND, PARTICULARLY THAT PART OF IT CALLED THE HIGHLANDS.


From Langtown to Langholm, through Part of Eskdale.—A View of Netherby, Sir James Graham's—at Langholm, a Castle, the Duke of Buccleugh's.—Ewesdale—Mosspole—Part of Tiviotdale—Hawick—Selkirk—a fine Part of Tweedale, at Yair and Fairnalie—Bank House.—The first sight of Edinburgh, from the Middleton Road.—The President Dundas's.—Dalhousie Castle.—Leswade.—Melville Castle. p. 99

A Description of Edinburgh—Arthur's Seat—the fine Echo—Dediston Lake, and House—Crag Miller Castle—Dalkeith—Roslin Castle—Hauthorndean—Penny-wedding—The Views from Calton Hill, and Arthur's Seat. p. 113

From Edinburgh to Queensferry—Hopetoun House—Kinross, and Loch Leven—the Town of the Crook of Devon—the Rumbling Brig, and the Cauldron Lin—Dollar, and the Ruin of Castle Campbell.—From Dollar to Stirling.—A Description of Stirling, and the View from the Castle. p. 132

Blair Drummond—Doune—Ben Lomond—Ben Lidi—Callender.—The Trosacks, or Wonders around Loch Catheine—Brackland Brig, and the Falls of the Kelty.—The Pass of Lennie, and the Falls at it.—Ben Lidi—Loch Lubnaig—Loch Earn Head—Eden Ample—Loch Earn—Deneira, Mr Dundas's—Dalchonzie—Aberuhill—Comrie—Lawers House—Ochtertyre. p. 145

Crieff—Drummond Castle—Monzie—View in the Amulrie Road—Glen Almond—Brig of Buchanty—Logie Almond—Leadnock—and the Tomb of Bessy Bell and Mary Gray. p. 166

Perth.—The View approaching to Perth from the South—Field Preaching—Dupplin—Freeland—Invermay—Abernethy, the old Pictish Town.—Coal Pits—Scone—Stanley—Taymount—Lin of Campsie.—Stubhall—Mieklour House—Loch Clunie—Marlie—Ard Blair—Blair Gowrie—Keith of Blair Gowrie—Craig Hall—Black Jock of Atholl—Lady at Saint Kilda—Reeky Lin—the De'il in the Shape of a black Dog—Ayrly Castle. p. 177

Delvin—Murthly—Birnam Wood—Stenton—Dungarthill—Dunheld—the Rumbling Brig over the Brand.—The Road from Dunkeld to Blair of Atholl.—Fascalie—Pass of Killycrankie.—Lord Dundee's Tombstone—Lude—Blair of Atholl—Atholl Brose—Bruar Falls—Dalnacardoch Inn—Loch Garrie—Dalwhinie Inn.—Spey Bridge—Pitmain Inn—Aviemore Inn—Rothamurchus, and Cairngouram—Dulsie Brig—Calder—Fort George. p. 196

Castle Stewart—Culloden—Inverness—Dochfour.—Country of Aird—Lovat—Beauley—Glen Urquhart—Cumming's Family—Loch Ness. p. 222

The Road from Inverness to General's Hut—Fall of Fyres—Strath Errick—Fine View of Fort Augustus—Fort Augustus—Opening between Fort Augustus and Fort William—Loch Oich—Invergary—Loch Lochy—Letter Findlay Inn—Prince Charles Stuart, 1746—Low Bridge—High Bridge—Fort William—and Mary's Burgh, or Gordon's Burgh—Loch Eil—Ben Nivis—Bottle of Whisky. p. 237

Pass over Corryarraick—Garvimore Inn.—From Dalnacardoch into Rannoch—Rannoch, and Loch Rannoch—Loch Ericht—Poet Strowan—Who'll buy Jonny Cope's Salve—Rock Crystal Globe. p. 271

Cross Mount in Rannoch—Schiehallion Mountain—the lost Star—Water Fall in Cashaville—Ruins— Appneydow—Castle Menzies—Wade's Bridge, or Tay Bridge—Aberfeldie—Moness Falls, very fine—Weem Inn.—Taymouth—Loch Tay—Glen Lyon—Kenmore Town. p. 304

Killin—Fingall's Grave—Glen and Loch Dochart—Glen Fillan—Saint Fillan's Holy Well—Tyndrum Inn—Lead Mines—Inverounon—Loch Tollie—the Black Mount—King's House Inn—the Devil's Staircase—Glen Coe p. 324

Road from Tyndrum to Inveraray—Glen Lochy.—A fine View of Glen Orchy—Cruchan Ben—Dalmally Inn—Loch Awe—astonishing Cascade of Loch Etive—Beregonium—wild Country between Dalmally and Inveraray—Loch Fine—Inveraray. p. 351

Cairndow Inn—Ardinglass—Glen Kinglass—Pass over Rest-and-be-Thankful—Glen Croe—Loch Long—Aroquhar Inn—Loch Lomond—Ben Lomond—Luss—Dumbarton—Glasgow. p. 366

Bothwell Castle—Hamilton—Banks of the Clyde—Stone Biers Force, a grand Fall of the Clyde.—Lanerk—Lee Place—Lee Penny—Great Oak Tree at Lee—Carstairs House—Boniton—the Falls of Clyde, called Boniton Falls, and Corie Lin.—Dale's Cotton Works—Borronauld—Cartland Crags, the Hiding Place of Wallace—Douglas Mill Inn—Douglas Castle—Elvan Foot—Moffat—Annandale. p. 380


This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.