American Jurist and Law Magazine/Volume 1

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THE

AMERICAN JURIST,

AND

LAW MAGAZINE.

VOL. I.

JANUARY AND APRIL, 1829.

"Hanc igitur video sapientissimorum fuisse sententiam, legem neque hominum ingeniis excogitatam, nec scitum aliquod esse populorum, sed aeternum quiddam, quod universum mundum regeret, imperandi prohibendique sapientia."—Cicero.

BOSTON,

FREEMAN & BOLLES, COURT STREET, CORNER OF BRATTLE STREET.

1829.

TO SUBSCRIBERS AND THE PUBLIC.

The editors of the American Jurist present their second number to the public, corresponding more nearly than the first to the plan on which it is proposed to conduct the work. It is intended, hereafter, to make the department of intelligence still more extensive than it is in the present number. The digest of recent decisions will be continued in the succeeding numbers. The object will be to give merely an index to those decisions which are of general interest throughout the country, omitting those which depend on local statutes and usages. Cases however depending on statutes of limitations or of frauds, or other statutes which are similar in many states, will be embraced in the digest. The analysis of legislation will be also continued and extended to all the states. The conductors of the work will by these means endeavor to make it exhibit a correct view of the course of cotemporary legislation and judicial decisions. It has been and will still continue to be their object to make the work national and general, introducing only those subjects which are likely to be interesting in every part of the United States. They will also endeavor to fill their volumes with subjects of lasting interest, and to make them of permanent utility, and with this view they will refrain from introducing to any considerable extent reports of cases which will appear in the volumes of reports, including only interesting and important cases that may come to their knowledge, which would not otherwise be published in a form convenient for reference. It is proposed particularly to make the work the vehicle of elaborate written opinions of eminent lawyers on important questions; and the conductors request a communication of such opinions.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1925. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).