Armistice Day/Programs for Armistice Day

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PROGRAMS FOR ARMISTICE DAY


ARMISTICE DAY

Arranged by National Americanism Commission, American Legion, Indianapolis, Indiana.

A.M.
10:45 Assembly.
10:55 Firing of guns and bombs.
11:00 Cease firing.
11:01 Invocation (Chaplain of The American Legion).
11:05 Music.
11:11 Reading ("In Flanders Fields," or other appropriate selection).
11:15 Advance of Allied Flags to Positions of Honor. (This advance will be accompanied by a medley of the national airs of the Allied Countries. As each flag is put in its place, the national air of its country will be played.)
11:25 Music.
11:30 Address, "Armistice Day—Its Significance."
11:55 The National Anthem.
Afternoon—Sport events.
Evening—Fireworks and dancing.


PROGRAMS FOR ARMISTICE DAY

ARRANGED BY SOMEPLE AND OTHERS

FROM "LEST WE FORGET"[1]

SUGGESTIVE PROGRAM NO. 1, FOR COMMUNITY EXERCISES

Patriotic March, by the Band or Orchestra.

Song—Kipling's "Lest We Forget" This may be sung to the tune "Magdalen" and will be found in many church hymnals.

Invocation

God of our fathers, known of old,
Lord of our far-flung battle line,
Beneath whose awful hand we hold
Dominion over palm and pine:
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget, lest we forget!

Lest we forget the courage, patience and patriotic self-sacrifice of those who fought at Château-Thierry, in the Argonne and the supreme sacrifice of those who lie in Flanders fields. We thank Thee for the splendid lessons of heroism that we have learned from those who died that this world might be free. They gave the last full measure of devotion. We cherish their memories in our hearts and opposite the name of each we place the gold star of service.

We thank Thee for the vigorous vital Americanism of those who have come back to us. They endured much that we might live free from the rule of a despot. Now they are just as courageously and patiently fighting the everyday battles of our complex American life. Bless them, we pray Thee. May they lead us on to nobler deeds, higher thoughts and greater achievements. May we take a lesson from their self-sacrificing heroism and may we help to make this great land of ours a free and happy home for those who are yet to come. May we all so live that those who have gone will not have died in vain and those who are with us will not have lived in vain and that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Amen.


Song—"America."

Address of Tribute—By a prominent citizen.

Response—By a member of the American Legion.

Vocal or Instrumental Solo.

Principal Address of the Occasion—By an eminent speaker.

Song—"Star-Spangled Banner."

Benediction.


SUGGESTIVE PROGRAM NO. 2, FOR COMMUNITY EXERCISES

Song—"Star-Spangled Banner."

Invocation.

Recitation—"In Flanders Fields."

Recitation—"Other Poppies."

Drill—"Song of the Colors."

Reading—"Censored."

Dialogue'—"Young Patriots."

Solo—"Keep the Home Fires Burning," "Dear Old Pal of Mine," or something else appropriate.

Play—"Uncle Sam's Best" or an address of tribute may be given instead.

Reading—"Lest We Forget" closes the program.


SUGGESTIVE PROGRAM NO. 3, FOR COMMUNITY EXERCISES

Patriotic March, by Band or Orchestra.

Song—"America"

Recitation—"My Country"

Recitation—"The Soldier's Toast."

Instrumental Selection—Violin or piano solo.

Musical Reading—"When the Band Plays 'Over There.'"

Recitation—"The Service Flag."

Recitation—"The Boys Who Are Not There."

Solo—"Lest We Forget." This may be sung to the tune "Magdalen," which will be found in most church hymnals.

Play—"When the Armistice Was Signed"; or, if preferred, the retelling of the story, "Yellow Butterflies," would be quite appropriate.

Closing Song—"America the Beautiful."


SUGGESTIVE PROGRAM NO. 4, FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL

Song—"Star-Spangled Banner," by the school.

Opening Address—By principal or teacher.

Recitation—"In Flanders Fields."

Recitation—"Other Poppies."

Solo—Either instrumental or vocal, to be selected. "Dear Old Pal of Mine" would be quite fitting.

Play—"For Liberty's Sake," or, "Uncle Sam's Best."

Closing Song—To be selected. "Keep the Home Fires Burning" or a similar song would be appropriate.


SUGGESTIVE PROGRAM NO. 5, FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL

Patriotic Song or March—To be selected.

Reading—"Lest We Forget"—By a teacher.

Song—"America," by the school.

Recitation—"My Country."

Recitation—"The Boys Who Are Not There."

Solo—Instrumental or vocal, to be selected.

Retelling of the Story—"Yellow Butterflies," or an address by a townsman.

Song—"America the Beautiful."


SUGGESTIVE PROGRAM NO. 6, FOR MIXED GRADES

Song—Any patriotic selection.

Recitation—"Wreaths in Verse."

Recitation—"My Country."

Solo—Instrumental or vocal selection.

Drill—Our Colors."

Dialogue—"The Bugler."

Song—"War Saving Stamps."

Dialogue—"Young Patriots."

Reading—"Lest We Forget."

Song—"America," or some other patriotic anthem.


PROGRAMS FOR ARMISTICE DAY

SUGGESTED BY MARY E. HAZELTINE

(Library School of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin)


I

Music—Marching Song, by Blank American Legion Band


Invocation Rev. J. C. Blank


Song—America By the School, led by the Band


"The Armistice," the text as signed on Nov. 11th, 1918 James Law, Chaplain of the Legion


Poem—"America's Welcome Home" by Van Dyke Jessie Arns


Address—"The First Armistice Day" Prof. J. H. Easton, Supt. of Schools


Song—"When There is Peace" Legion Glee Club


Poem—"The Unknown Soldier," by Angela Morgan James Rogers


Address—"Tribute to the Unknown Soldier"


Song—"Star-Spangled Banner" Audience, led by Band


Benediction Rev. J. C. Blank

II.

  1. Song—"America."
  2. Salute to the Flag.
  3. Reciting "Pledge of Allegiance" in unison.
  4. Reading—Wilson's War Message: "Why We Went to War."
  5. Recitation—"In Flanders Fields"—Lieut. Col. McCrea.
  6. Songs—"Over There" and "Smiles."
  7. Recitation—"The American's Creed"—Walter Tyler Page (with an account of how it came to be written).
  8. Story—"Pershing at Lafayette's Tomb" (Colonel C. E. Stanton's sentiment—"We are here, Lafayette.")
  9. Song—"America, the Beautiful."
  10. Talk—"Our Community's Record"—by some citizen.
  11. Recitation—"Old Glory"—James Whitcomb Riley.
  12. Songs—"The Marseillaise" and "There's a Long, Long Trail."


PROGRAM FOR THE CELEBRATION OF ARMISTICE DAY

(Suggested by The American Legion National Americanism Commission)

A.M.  
7:00— Sunrise gun (can be fired with anvils in case no cannon is available).
8:15— First call (bugle for parade formation).
8:30— Assembly (bugle for parade formation).
8:45— Starting gun or bomb for parade.
9:45— Arrival of parade elements at the assembly point.
9:50— Salute of one gun; band—"Star-Spangled Banner."
10:00— Invocation.
10:05— Music by band, soloist or chorus.
10:10— Responsive reading.
10:15— Address by post commander or designated person.
10:25— Music by soloist or chorus.
10:30— Roll call of World War dead of community, by post adjutant of The American Legion.
10:40— Address by Legion speaker of day (caution must be used not to permit this speaker to utilize more than twenty minutes if this schedule is used).
11:00— Salute of three guns; bugle call, "Taps," with echo if possible (in larger cities several calls may be used in various sections). Thirty seconds of silent prayer for World War dead. All business ceases.
11:10— Introduction of speaker of the day.
11:15— Address by speaker of the day.
11:55— "America" by audience.
NOON  
12:00— Pledge to flag.
  Adjournment.

During the noon hour a community dinner, picnic, barbecue, army mess, or other style of "feed" may be served, or posts may serve dinner in large hall.

P.M.
1:30— Afternoon program opened by firing of aëerial bomb.
1:40— Competitive drill by Boy Scout troops, R.O.T.C. units, fraternal drill teams or others.
2:25— Start of cross country race less than three miles.
2:45— Football game between high school, Legion or local independent teams.
3:25— Finish of cross-country race.
4:15— Band concert.
7:45— Block dancing.
Fireworks.
Amateur play.
Motion pictures.
Dinner for World War veterans.


List of Subjects for Essay Contests

How the War Stirred Inventive Genius.

The Proposed Universal Draft.

The International Alliance of War Veterans.

The Flag Code and What It Teaches.


List of Subjects for Addresses

Gold Star Heroes.

Service to the Nation.

Soldiers of War and Peace.

What the War Meant.

THE END

  1. Published by March Bros., Lebanon, Ohio.