Banks of the Ban/The Banks of the Ban

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Banks of the Ban  (1816) 
The Banks of the Ban

THE BANKS OF THE BAN.

On Esebeth harbour, that place call’d Hiltown,
"Where the rivers & fountains they did me surround;
I spied a fair female as you soon shall understand,
Was viewing small fishes on the banks of the Ban.

I stepped up to her, and to her did say,
Kind nature has fram’d you all hearts to betray,
But if you will go with me, love, here is my hand
That we will be married on the banks of the Ban.

It’s I can’t go with you, young man, she did say,
For you are a stranger and would me betray,
And I a chaste virgin might break the command.
Your absence is a cordial on the banks of the Ban.

O at length my persuasions they seem to take place,
I knew from the blushes was seen in her face;
Her feet they did slide oh the soft beds of sand;
She fell into my arms on the banks of the Ban.

But she being come to her senses again,
And then being gall’d with a sense of her shame;
She cried, you’ve undone me, my dear, out of hand,
Come let us be married on the banks of the Ban.

It's I cannot marry you, for I am a prentice bound
To a young weaver nigh Rufryland town;
But when my trade’s learned, love, here is my hand
That we will be married on the banks of the Ban.

It’s since you will not marry me, pray tell me your name;
Or where is your dwelling or from whence you came:
My name’s William Engiam on the Elegenstan,
My dwelling is near to the bank of the Ban.

Come all you young maidens wherever you be,
That wishes to ponder my sad destiny;
When you go a roving by two or by one
Take care of the angler who roves on the Ban.

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This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.