Child's Ballads/17

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Contents

A[edit]

IN Scotland there was a babie born,
      Refrain:Lill lal, etc.
And his name it was called young Hind Horn.
      Refrain:With a fal lal, etc.

He sent a letter to our king
That he was in love with his daughter Jean.

He's gien to her a silver wand,
With seven living lavrocks sitting thereon.

She's gien to him a diamond ring,
With seven bright diamonds set therein.

"When this ring grows pale and wan,
You may know by it my love is gane."

One day as he looked his ring upon,
He saw the diamonds pale and wan.

He left the sea and came to land,
And the first that he met was an old beggar man.

"What news, what news?" said young Hind Horn;
"No news, no news," said the old beggar man.

"No news," said the beggar, "No news at a',
But there is a wedding in the king's ha.

"But there is a wedding in the king's ha,
That has halden these forty days and twa."

"Will ye lend me your begging coat?
And I'll lend you my scarlet cloak.

"Will you lend me your beggar's rung?
And I'll gie you my steed to ride upon.

"Will you lend me your wig o hair,
To cover mine, because it is fair?"

The auld beggar man was bound for the mill,
But young Hind Horn for the king's hall.

The auld beggar man was bound for to ride,
But young Hind Horn was bound for the bride.

When he came to the king's gate,
He sought a drink for Hind Horn's sake.

The bride came down with a glass of wine,
When he drank out the glass, and dropt in the ring.

"O got ye this by sea or land?
Or got ye it off a dead man's hand?"

"I got not it by sea, I got it by land,
And I got it, madam, out of your own hand."

"O I'll cast off my gowns of brown,
And beg wi you frae town to town.

"O I'll cast off my gowns of red,
And I'll beg wi you to win my bread."

"Ye needna cast off your gowns of brown,
For I'll make you lady o many a town.

"Ye needna cast off your gowns of red,
It's only a sham, the begging o my bread."

The bridegroom he had wedded the bride,
But young Hind Horn he took her to bed.

B[edit]

I NEVER saw my love before,
      Refrain:With a hey lillelu and a ho lo lan
Till I saw her thro an oger bore.
      Refrain:With a hey down and a hey diddle downie

She gave to me a gay gold ring,
With three shining diamonds set therein.

And I gave to her a silver wand,
With three singing lavrocks set thereon.

"What if these diamonds lose their hue,
Just when your love begins for to rew?"

He's left the land, and he's gone to sea,
And he's stayd there seven years and a day.

But when he looked this ring upon,
The shining diamonds were both pale and wan.

He's left the seas and he's come to the land,
And there he met with an auld beggar man.

"What news, what news, thou auld beggar man
For it is seven years sin I've seen lan."

"No news," said the old beggar man, "at all,
But there is a wedding in the king's hall."

"Wilt thou give to me thy begging coat?
And I'll give to thee my scarlet cloak.

"Wilt thou give to me thy begging staff?
And I'll give to thee my good gray steed."

The old beggar man was bound for to ride,
But Young Hynd Horn was bound for the bride.

When he came to the king's gate,
He asked a drink for Young Hynd Horn's sake.

The news unto the bonnie bride came
That at the yett there stands an auld man.

"There stands an auld man at the king's gate;
He asketh a drink for young Hyn Horn's sake."

"I'll go thro nine fires so hot,
But I'll give him a drink for Young Hyn Horn's sake."

She gave him a drink out of her own hand;
He drank out the drink and he dropt in the ring.

"Got thou't by sea, or got thou't by land?
Or got thou't out of any dead man's hand?"

"I got it not by sea, but I got it by land,
For I got it out of thine own hand."

"I'll cast off my gowns of brown,
And I'll follow thee from town to town.

"I'll cast off my gowns of red,
And along with thee I'll beg my bread."

"Thou need not cast off thy gowns of brown,
For I can make thee lady of many a town.

"Thou need not cast off thy gowns of red,
For I can maintain thee with both wine and bread."

The bridegroom thought he had the bonnie bride wed,
But Young Hyn Horn took the bride to bed.

C[edit]

YOUNG Hyn Horn's to the king's court gone,
      Refrain:Hoch hey and an ney O
He's fallen in love with his little daughter Jean.
      Refrain:Let my love alone, I pray you

He's bocht to her a little gown,
With seven broad flowers spread it along.

She's given to him a gay gold ring.
The posie upon it was richt plain.

"When you see it losing its comely hue,
So will I my love to you."

Then within a little wee,
Hyn Horn left land and went to sea.

When he lookt his ring upon,
He saw it growing pale and wan.

Then within a little [wee] again,
Hyn Horn left sea and came to the land.

As he was riding along the way,
There he met with a jovial beggar.

"What news, what news, old man?" he did say:
"This is the king's young dochter's wedding day."

"If this be true you tell to me,
You must niffer clothes with me.

"You'll gie me your cloutit coat,
I'll gie you my fine velvet coat.

"You'll gie me your cloutit pock,
I'll gie you my purse; it'll be no joke."

"Perhaps there['s] nothing in it, not one bawbee;"
"Yes, there's gold and silver both," said he.

"You'll gie me your bags of bread,
And I'll gie you my milk-white steed."

When they had niffered all, he said,
"You maun learn me how I'll beg."

"When you come before the gate,
You'll ask for a drink for the highman's sake."

When that he came before the gate,
He calld for a drink for the highman's sake.

The bride cam tripping down the stair,
To see whaten a bold beggar was there.

She gave him a drink with her own hand;
He loot the ring drop in the can.

"Got ye this by sea or land?
Or took ye't aff a dead man's hand?"

"I got na it by sea nor land,
But I got it aff your own hand."

The bridegroom cam tripping down the stair,
But there was neither bride nor beggar there.

Her ain bridegroom had her first wed,
But Young Hyn Horn had her first to bed.

D[edit]

NEAR Edinburgh was a young son born,
      Refrain:Hey lilelu an a how low lan
An his name it was called young Hyn Horn.
      Refrain:An it's hey down down deedle airo

Seven long years he served the king,
An it's a' for the sake of his daughter Jean.

The king an angry man was he;
He send young Hyn Horn to the sea.

  • * * * *


An on his finger she put a ring.
. . . . .

  • * * * *


"When your ring turns pale and wan,
Then I'm in love wi another man."

  • * * * *


Upon a day he lookd at his ring,
It was as pale as anything.

He's left the sea, an he's come to the lan,
An there he met an auld beggar man.

"What news, what news, my auld beggar man?
What news, what news, by sea or by lan?"

"Nae news, nae news," the auld beggar said,
"But the king's dochter Jean is going to be wed."

"Cast off, cast off thy auld beggar-weed,
An I'll gie thee my gude gray steed."

  • * * * *


When he cam to our guid king's yet,
He sought a glass o wine for young Hyn Horn's sake.

He drank out the wine, an he put in the ring,
An he bade them carry't to the king's dochter Jean.

  • * * * *


"O gat ye't by sea, or gat ye't by lan?
Or gat ye't aff a dead man's han?"

"I gat na't by sea, I gat na't by lan,
But I gat it out of your own han."

  • * * * *


take away my bridal gown,
For I'll follow him frae town to town."

"Ye need na leave your bridal gown,
For I'll make ye ladie o mony a town."

E[edit]

  • * * *

HYND HORN he has lookt on his ring,
      Refrain:Hey ninny ninny, how ninny nanny
And it was baith black and blue,
And she is either dead or she's married.
      Refrain:And the barck and the broom blooms bonnie

Hynd Horn he has shuped to land,
And the first he met was an auld beggar man.

"What news, what news, my silly auld man?
For it is seven years syne I have seen land.

"What news, what news, my auld beggar man?
What news, what news, by sea or by land?"

"There is a king's dochter in the east,
And she has been marryed these nine nights past.

"Intil the bride's bed she winna gang
Till she hears tell of her Hynd Horn."

"Cast aff, cast aff thy auld beggar weed,
And I will gie thee my gude gray steed."

F[edit]

IN Newport town this knight was born,
      Refrain:Hey lily loo, hey loo lan
And they've called him Young Hynd Horn.
      Refrain:Fal lal la, fal the dal the dady

Seven long years he served the king,
For the love of his daughter Jean.

He courted her through a wimble bore,
The way never woman was courted before.

He gave her through a silver wand,
With three singing laverocks there upon.

She gave him back a gay gold ring,
With three bright diamonds glittering.

"When this ring grows pale and blue,
Fair Jeanie's love is lost to you."

Young Hynd Horn is gone to sea,
And there seven long years staid he.

When he lookd his ring upon,
It grew pale and it grew wan.

Young Hynd Horn is come to land,
When he met an old beggar man.

"What news, what news doth thee betide?"
"No news, but Princess Jeanie's a bride."

"Will ye give me your old brown cap?
And I'll give you my gold-laced hat.

"Will ye give me your begging weed?
And I'll give you my good grey steed."

The beggar has got on to ride,
But Young Hynd Horn's bound for the bride.

  • * * * *

G[edit]

"HYNDE HORN's bound love, and Hynde Horn's free,
Whare was ye born, or in what countrie?"

"In gude greenwud whare I was born,
And all my friends left me forlorn.

"I gave my love a silver wand;
That was to rule oure all Scotland.

"My love gave me a gay gowd ring;
That was to rule abune a' thing."

"As lang as that ring keeps new in hue,
Ye may ken that your love loves you.

"But whan that ring turns pale and wan,
Ye may ken that your love loves anither man."

He hoisted up his sails, and away sailed he,
Till that he cam to a foreign countrie.

He looked at his ring; it was turnd pale and wan;
He said, "I wish I war at hame again."

He hoisted up his sails, and hame sailed he,
Until that he came to his ain countrie.

The first ane that he met wi
Was wi a puir auld beggar man.

"What news, what news, my silly old man?
What news hae ye got to tell to me?"

"Na news, na news," the puir man did say,
"But this is our queen's wedding day."

"Ye'll lend me your begging weed,
And I'll gie you my riding steed."

"My begging weed is na for thee,
Your riding steed is na for me."

But he has changed wi the beggar man,
. . . . .

"Which is the gate that ye used to gae?
And what are the words ye beg wi?"

"Whan ye come to yon high hill,
Ye'll draw your bent bow nigh until.

"Whan ye come to yonder town,
Ye'll let your bent bow low fall down.

"Ye'll seek meat for St Peter, ask for St Paul,
And seek for the sake of Hynde Horn all.

"But tak ye frae nane of them a',
Till ye get frae the bonnie bride hersel O."

Whan he cam to yon high hill,
He drew his bent bow nigh until.

And whan he cam to yonder town,
He lute his bent bow low fall down.

He saught meat for St Peter, he askd for St Paul,
And he sought for the sake of Hynde Horn all.

But he would tak frae nane o them a',
Till he got frae the bonnie bride hersel O.

The bride cam tripping doun the stair,
Wi the scales o red gowd on her hair.

Wi a glass of red wine in her hand,
To gie to the puir auld beggar man.

It's out he drank the glass o wine,
And into the glass he dropt the ring.

"Got ye't by sea, or got ye't by land,
Or got ye't aff a drownd man's hand?"

"I got na't by sea, I got na't by land,
Nor got I it off a drownd man's hand.

"But I got it at my wooing,
And I'll gie it at your wedding."

"I'll tak the scales o gowd frae my head,
I'll follow you, and beg my bread.

"I'll tak the scales of gowd frae my hair,
I'll follow you, for evermair."

She has tane the scales o gowd frae her head,
She has followed him to beg her bread.

She has tane the scales o gowd frae her hair,
And she has followed him for evermair.

But atween the kitchen and the ha,
There he lute his cloutie cloak fa.

And the red gowd shined oure him a',
And the bride frae the bridegroom was stown awa.

H[edit]

"HYND HORN fair, and Hynd Horn free,
O where were you born, in what countrie?"

"In gude greenwood, there I was born,
And all my forbears me beforn.

"O seven years I served the king,
And as for wages, I never gat nane;

"But ae sight o his ae daughter,
And that was thro an augre bore.

"My love gae me a siller wand,
'twas to rule ower a' Scotland.

"And she gae me a gay gowd ring,
The virtue o't was above a' thing."

"As lang's this ring it keeps the hue,
Ye'll know I am a lover true:

"But when the ring turns pale and wan,
Ye'll know I love another man."

He hoist up sails, and awa saild he,
And saild into a far countrie.

And when he lookd upon his ring,
He knew she loved another man.

He hoist up sails and home came he,
Home unto his ain countrie.

The first he met on his own land,
It chancd to be a beggar man.

"What news, what news, my gude auld man?
What news, what news, hae ye to me?"

"Nae news, nae news," said the auld man,
"The morn's our queen's wedding day."

"Will ye lend me your begging weed?
And I'll lend you my riding steed."

"My begging weed will ill suit thee,
And your riding steed will ill suit me."

But part be right, and part be wrang,
Frae the beggar man the cloak he wan.

"Auld man, come tell to me your leed;
What news ye gie when ye beg your bread."

"As ye walk up unto the hill,
Your pike staff ye lend ye till.

"But whan ye come near by the yett,
Straight to them ye will upstep.

"Take nane frae Peter, nor frae Paul,
Nane frae high or low o them all.

"And frae them all ye will take nane,
Until it comes frae the bride's ain hand."

He took nane frae Peter nor frae Paul,
Nane frae the high nor low o them all.

And frae them all he would take nane,
Until it came frae the bride's ain hand.

The bride came tripping down the stair,
The combs o red gowd in her hair.

A cup o red wine in her hand,
And that she gae to the beggar man.

Out o the cup he drank the wine,
And into the cup he dropt the ring.

"O got ye't by sea, or got ye't by land,
Or got ye't on a drownd man's hand?"

"I got it not by sea, nor got it by land,
Nor got I it on a drownd man's hand.

"But I got it at my wooing gay,
And I'll gie't you on your wedding day."

"I'll take the red gowd frae my head,
And follow you, and beg my bread.

"I'll take the red gowd frae my hair,
And follow you for evermair."

Atween the kitchen and the ha,
He loot his cloutie cloak down fa.

And wi red gowd shone ower them a',
And frae the bridegroom the bride he sta.

I[edit]

  • * * *

She gave him a gay gold ring,
      Refrain:Hey lillelu and how lo lan

But he gave her a far better thing.
      Refrain:With my hey down and a hey diddle downie

He gave her a silver wan,
With nine bright laverocks thereupon.

  • * * * *


Young Hynd Horn is come to the lan,
There he met a beggar man.

"What news, what news do ye betide?"
"Na news but Jeanie's the prince's bride."

"Wilt thou give me thy begging weed?
And I'll give thee my good grey steed.

"Wilt thou give me thy auld grey hair?
And I'll give ye mine that is thrice as fair."

The beggar he got on for to ride,
But young Hynd Horn is bound for the bride.

First the news came to the ha,
Then to the room mang the gentles a'.

"There stands a beggar at our gate,
Asking a drink for young Hynd Horn's sake."

"I'll ga through nine fires hot
To give him a drink for young Hynd Horn's sake."

She gave him the drink, and he dropt in the ring;
They lady turned baith pale an wan.

"Oh got ye it by sea, or got ye it by lan?
Or got ye it off some dead man's han?"

"I got it not by sea, nor I got it not by lan,
But I got it off thy milk-white han."

"I'll cast off my dress of red,
And I'll go with thee and beg my bread.

"I'll cast off my dress of brown,
And follow you from city to town.

"I'll cast off my dress of green,
For I am not ashamed with you to be seen."

"You need not cast off your dress of red,
For I can support thee on both wine and bread.

"You need not cast off your dress of brown,
For I can keep you a lady in any town.

"You need not cast off your dress of green,
For I can maintain you as gay as a queen."