Child's Ballads/173

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search


A[edit]

WORDRR'rrS gane to the kitchen,
And word's gane to the ha,
That Marie Hamilton gangs wi bairn
To the hichest Stewart of a'.
He's courted her in the kitchen,
He's courted her in the ha,
He's courted her in the laigh cellar,
And that was warst of a'.
She's tyed it in her apron
And she's thrown it in the sea;
Says, Sink ye, swim ye, bonny wee babe!
You'l neer get mair o me.
Down them cam the auld queen,
Goud tassels tying her hair:
'O marie, where's the bonny wee babe
That I heard greet sae sair?'
'There never was a babe intill my room,
As little designs to be;
It was but a touch o my sair side,
Come oer my fair bodie.'
'O Marie, put on your robes o black,
Or else your robes o brown,
For ye maun gang wi me the night,
To see fair Edinbro town.'
'I winna put on my robes o black,
Nor yet my robes o brown;
But I'll put on my robes o white,
To shine through Edinbro town.'
When she gaed up the Cannogate,
She laughd loud laughters three;
But whan she cam down the Cannogate
The tear blinded her ee.
When she gaed up the Parliament stair,
The heel cam aff her shee;
And lang or she cam down again
She was condemnd to dee.
When she cam down the Cannogate,
The Cannogate sae free,
Many a ladie lookd oer her window,
Weeping for this ladie.
'Ye need nae weep for me,' she says,
'Ye need nae weep for me;
For had I not slain mine own sweet babe,
This death I wadna dee.
'Bring me a bottle of wine,' she says,
'The best that eer ye hae,
That I may drink to my weil-wishers,
And they may drink to me.
'Here's a health to the jolly sailors,
That sail upon the main;
Let them never let on to my father and mother
But what I'm coming hame.
'Here's a health to the jolly sailors,
That sail upon the sea;
Let them never let on to my father and mother
That I cam here to dee.
'Oh little did my mother think,
The day she cradled me,
What lands I was to travel through,
What death I was to dee.
'Oh little did my father think,
The day he held up me,
What lands I was to travel through,
What death I was to dee.
'Last night I washd the queen's feet,
And gently laid her down;
And a' the thanks I've gotten the nicht
To be hangd in Edinbro town!
'Last nicht there was four Maries,
The nicht there'l be but three;
There was Marie Seton, and Marie Beton,
And Marie Carmichael, and me.'

B[edit]

THERE were ladies, they lived in a bower,
And oh but they were fair!
The youngest o them is to the king's court,
To learn some unco lair.
She hadna been in the king's court
A twelve month and a day,
Till of her they could get na wark,
For wantonness and play.
Word is to the kitchen gane,
And word is to the ha,
And word is up to Madame the Queen,
And that is warst of a',
That Mary Hamilton has born a bairn,
To the hichest Stewart of a'.
'O rise, O rise, Mary Hamilton,
O rise, and tell to me
What thou did with thy sweet babe
We sair heard weep by thee.'
'Hold your tongue, madame,' she said,
'And let your folly be;
It was a shouir o sad sickness
Made me weep sae bitterlie.'
'O rise, O rise, Mary Hamilton,
O rise, and tell to me
What thou did with thy sweet babe
We sair heard weep by thee.'
'I put it in a piner-pig,
And set it on the sea;
I bade it sink, or it might swim,
It should neer come hame to me.'
'O rise,O rise, Mary Hamilton,
Arise, and go with me;
There is a wedding in Glasgow town
This day we'll go and see.'
She put not on her black clothing,
She put not on her brown,
But she put on the glistering gold,
To shine thro Edinburgh town.
As they came into Edinburgh town,
The city for to see,
The bailie's wife and the provost's wife
Said, Och an alace for thee!
Gie never alace for me,' she said,
'Gie never alace for me;
It's all for the sake of my poor babe,
This death that I maun die.'
As they gaed up the Tolbuith stair,
The stair it was sae hie,
The bailie's son and the provost's son
Said, Och an alace for thee!
'Gie never alace for me,' she said,
'Gie never alace for me!
It's all for the sake of my puir babe,
This death I maun die.
'But bring to me a cup,' she says,
'A cup bot and a can,
And I will drink to all my friends,
And they'll drink to me again.
re's to you all, travellers,
Who travels by land or sea;
Let na wit to my father nor mother
The death that I must die.
'Here's to you all, travellers,
That travels on dry land;
Let na wit to my father nor mother
But I am coming hame.
'Little did my mother think,
First time she cradled me,
What land I was to travel on,
Or what death I would die.
'Little did my mother think,
First time she tied my head,
What land I was to tread upon,
Or whare I would win my bread.
'Yestreen Queen Mary had four Maries,
This night she'll hae but three;
She had Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton,
And Mary Carmichael, and me.
'Yestreen I wush Queen Mary's feet,
And bore her till her bed;
This day she's given me my reward,
This gallows-tree to tread.
'Cast off, cast off my goun,' she said,
'But let my petticoat be,
And tye a napkin on my face,
For that gallows I downa see.'
By and cum the king himsell,
Lookd up with a pitiful ee:
'Come down, come down, Mary Hamilton,
This day thou wilt dine with me.'
'Hold your tongue, my sovereign leige,
And let your folly be;
An ye had a mind to save my life,
Ye should na shamed me here.'

C[edit]

THERE lived a lord into the west,
And he had dochters three,
And the youngest o them is to the king's court,
To learn some courtesie.
She was not in the king's court
A twelvemonth and a day,
Till she was neither able to sit nor gang,
Wi the gaining o some play.
She went to the garden,
To pull the leaf aff the tree,
To tak this bonnie babe frae her breast,
But alas it would na do!
She rowed it in her handkerchief,
And threw it in the sea:
'O sink ye, swim ye, wee wee babe!
Ye'll get nae mair o me.'
Word is to the kitchen gane,
And word is to the ha,
That Mary Myle she goes wi child
To the highest Steward of a'.
Down and came the queen hersell,
The queen hersell so free:
'O mary Myle, whare is the child
That I heard weep for thee?'
'O hold your tongue now, Queen,' she says,
'O hold your tongue so free!
For it was but a shower o the sharp sickness,
I was almost like to die.'
'O busk ye, busk ye, Mary Myle,
O busk, and go wi me;
O busk ye, busk ye, Mary Mile,
It's Edinburgh town to see.'
'I'll no put on my robes o black,
No nor yet my robes [o] brown;
But I'll put on my golden weed,
To shine thro Edinburgh town.'
When she went up the Cannongate-side,
The Cannongate-side so free,
Oh there she spied some ministers' lads,
Crying Och and alace for me!
'Dinna cry och and alace for me!
Dinna cry o[c]h and alace for me!
For it's all for the sake of my innocent babe
That I come here to die.'
When she went up the Tolbooth-stair,
The lap cam aff her shoe;
Before that she came down again,
She was condemned to die.
'O all you gallant sailors,
That sail upon the sea,
Let neither my father nor mother know
The death I am to die!
'O all you gallant sailors,
That sail upon the faem,
Let neither my father nor mother know
But I am coming hame!
'Little did my mother know,
The hour that she bore me,
What lands I was to travel in,
What death I was to die.
'Little did my father know,
When he held up my head,
What lands I was to travel in,
What was to be my deid.
'Yestreen I made Queen Mary's bed,
Kembed doun her yellow hair;
Is this the reward I am to get,
To tread this gallows-stair!'

D[edit]

THERE lives a knight into the north,
And he had daughters three;
The ane of them was a barber's wife,
The other a gay ladie.
And the youngest of them is to Scotland gane,
The queen's Mary to be,
And a' that they could say or do,
Forbidden she woudna be.
The prince's bed it was sae saft,
The spices they were sae fine,
That out of it she couldna lye
While she was scarse fifteen.
She's gane to the garden gay
To pu of the savin tree;
But for a' that she could say or do,
The babie it would not die.
She's rowed it in her handkerchief,
She threw it in the sea;
Says, Sink ye, swim ye, my bonnie babe!
For ye'll get nae mair of me.
Queen Mary came tripping down the stair,
Wi the gold strings in her hair:
'O whare's the little babie,' she says,
'That I heard greet sae sair?'
'O hold your tongue, Queen Mary, my dame,
Let all those words go free!
It was mysell wi a fit o the sair colic,
I was sick just like to die.'
'O hold your tongue, Mary Hamilton,
Let all those words go free!
O where is the little babie
That I heard weep by thee?'
'I rowed it in my handkerchief,
And threw it in the sea;
I bade it sink, I bade it swim,
It would get nae mair o me.'
'O wae be to thee, Marie Hamilton,
And an ill deid may you die!
For if ye had saved the babie's life
It might hae been an honour to thee.
'Busk ye, busk ye, Marie Hamilton,
O busk ye to be a bride!
For I am going to Edinburgh toun,
Your gay wedding to bide.
'You must not put on your robes of black,
Nor yet your robes of brown;
But you must put on your yellow gold stuffs,
To shine thro Edinburgh town.'
'I will not put on my robes of black,
Nor yet my robes of brown;
But I will put on my yellow gold stuffs,
To shine thro Edinburgh town,'
As she went up the Parliament Close,
A riding on her horse,
There she saw many a cobler's lady,
Sat greeting at the cross.
'O what means a' this greeting?
I'm sure its nae for me;
For I'm come this day to Edinburgh town
Weel wedded for to be.'
When she gaed up the Parliament stair,
She gied loud lauchters three;
But ere that she came down again,
She was condemned to die.
'O little did my mother think,
The day she prinned my gown,
That I was to come sae far frae hame
To be hangid in Edinburgh town.
'O what'll my poor father think,
As he comes thro the town,
To see the face of his Molly fair
Hanging on the gallows-pin!
'Here's a health to the marineres,
That plough the raging main!
Let neither my mother nor father know
But I'm coming hame again!
'Here's a health to the sailors,
That sail upon the sea!
Let neither my mother nor father ken
That I came here to die!
'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
This night she'll hae but three;
There was Mary Beaton, and Mary Seaton,
And Mary Carmichael, and me.'
'O hald your tongue, Mary Hamilton,
Let all those words go free!
This night eer ye be hanged
Ye shall gang hame wi me.'
'O hald your tongue, Queen Mary, my dame,
Let all those words go free!
For since I have come to Edinburgh toun,
It's hanged I shall be,
And it shall neer be said that in your court
I was condemned to die.'

E[edit]

'MY father was the Duke of York,
My mother a lady free,
Mysell a dainty damsell,
Queen Mary sent for me.
'Yestreen I washd Queen Mary's feet,
Kam'd down her yellow hair,
And lay a' night in the young man's bed,
And I'll rue t for evermair.
'The queen's kale was aye sae het,
Her spice was aye sae fell,
Till they gart me gang to the young man's bed,
And I'd a' the wyte mysell.
'I was not in the queen's service
A twelvemonth but barely ane,
Ere I grew as big wi bairn
As ae woman could gang.
'But it fell ance upon a day,
Was aye to be it lane,
I did take strong travilling
As ever yet was seen.'
Ben it came the queen hersell,
Was a' gowd to the hair;
'O where's the bairn, Lady Maisry,
That I heard greeting sair?'
it came the queen hersell,
Was a' gowd to the chin:
'O where's the bairn, Lady Maisry,
That I heard late yestreen.'
'There is no bairn here,' she says,
'Nor never thinks to be;
'Twas but a stoun of sair sickness
That ye heard seizing me.'
They sought it out, they sought it in,
They sought it but and ben,
But between the bolster and the bed
They got the baby slain.
'Come busk ye, busk ye, Lady Maisdry,
Come busk, an go with me;
For I will on to Edinburgh,
And try the verity.'
She woud not put on the black, the black,
Nor yet wad she the brown,
But the white silk and the red scarlet,
That shin'd frae town to town.
As she gaed down thro Edinburgh town
The burghers' wives made meen,
That sic a dainty damsel
Sud ever hae died for sin.
Make never meen for me,' she says,
RR'Mrrakenever meen for me;
Seek never grace frae a graceless face,
For that ye'll never see.'
As she gaed up the Tolbooth stair,
A light laugh she did gie;
But lang ere she came down again
She was condemned to die.
'A' you that are in merchants-ships,
And cross the roaring faem,
Hae nae word to my father and mother,
But that I'm coming hame.
'Hold your hands, ye justice o peace,
Hold them a little while!
For yonder comes my father and mother,
That's travelld mony a mile.
'Gie me some o your gowd, parents,
Some o your white monie,
To save me frae the head o yon hill,
Yon greenwood gallows-tree.'
'Ye'll get nane o our gowd, daughter,
Nor nane o our white monie;
For we hae travelld mony a mile,
This day to see you die.'
'Hold your hands, ye justice o peace,
Hold them a little while!
For yonder comes him Warenston,
The father of my chile.
'Give me some o your gowd, Warenston,
Some o your white monie,
To save me frae the head o yon hill,
Yon greenwood gallows-tree.'
'I bade you nurse my bairn well,
And nurse it carefullie,
And gowd shoud been your hire, Maisry,
And my body your fee.'
He's taen out a purse o gowd,
Another o white monie,
And he's tauld down ten thousand crowns,
Says, True love, gang wi me.

F[edit]

my father was the Duke of York,
My mother a lady free,
Mysel a dainty demosell,
Queen Mary sent for me.
The queen's meat, it was sae sweet,
Her colthing was sae rare,
It made me lang for Sweet Willie's bed,
An I'll rue it ever maer.
Mary Beaton, and Mary Seaton,
And Lady Livinston, three,
We'll never meet in Queen Mary's bower,
Now Maries tho ye be.
Queen Mary sat in her bower,
Sewing her silver seam;
She thought she heard a baby greet,
But an a lady meen.
She threw her needle frae her,
Her seam out of her hand,
An she is on to Lady Mary's bower,
As fast as she could gang.
'Open your door, Lady Mary,' she says,
'And lat me come in;
For I hear baby greet,
But an a lady meen.'
'There is na bab in my bower, madam,
Nor never thinks to be,
But the strong pains of gravel
This night has seized me.'
She pat her fit to the door,
But an her knee,
Baith of brass and iron bands
In flinders she gard flee.
She pat a hand to her bed-head,
An ither to her bed-feet,
An bonny was the bab
Was blabbering in its bleed.
'Wae worth ye, Lady Mary,
An ill dead sall ye die!
For an ye widna kept the bonny bab,
Ye might ha sen't to me.'
'Lay na the wate on me, madam,
Lay na the wate on me!
For my fas love bare the brand at his side
That gared my barrine die.'
'Get up, Lady Beaton, get up, Lady Seton,
And Lady Livinstone three,
An we will on to Edinburgh,
An try this gay lady.'
As she came to the Cannongate,
The burgers' wives they cryed
Hon ohon, ochree! . .
. . . .
'O had you still, ye burgers' wives,
An make na meen for me;
Seek never grace of a graceless face,
For they hae nane to gie.
'Ye merchants and ye mariners,
That trade upon the sea,
O dinna tell in my country
The dead I'm gaen to die!
'Ye merchants and ye mariners,
That sail upo the faeme,
O dinna tell in my country
But that I'm comin hame!
'Little did my father think,
Whan he brought me our the sea,
That he wad see me yellow locks
Hang on a gallow's tree.
'Little did my mither think
Whan she brought me fra hame,
That she maught see my yellow loks
Han[g] on a gallow-pin.
'O had your hand a while!
. . .
For yonder comes my father,
I'm sure he'l borrow me.
'O some of your goud, father,
An of your well won fee,
To save me [frae the high hill]
[And ] frae the gallow-tree!'
'Ye's get nane of my goud,
Nor of my well won fee,
For I would gie five hundred pown
To see ye hangit hie.'
'O had yer hand a while!
. . .
Yonder is my love Willie,
Sure he will borrow me.
'O some o your goud, my love Willie,
An some o yer well won fee,
To save me frae the high hill,
And fra the gallow-tree!'
'Ye's get a' my goud,
And a' my well won fee,
To save ye fra the headin-hill,
And frae the gallow-tree.'

G[edit]

O MARY HAMILTON to the kirk is gane,
Wi ribbons in her hair;
An the king thoct mair o Marie
Then onie that were there.
Mary Hamilton's to the preaching gane,
Wi ribbons on her breast;
An the king thocht mair o Marie
Than he thocht o the priest.
Syne word is thro the palace gane,
I heard it tauld yestreen,
The king loes Mary Hamilton
Mair than he loes his queen.
A sad tale thro the town is gaen,
A sad tale on the morrow;
Oh Mary Hamilton has born a babe,
An slain it in her sorrow!
And down then cam the auld queen,
Goud tassels tied her hair:
'What did ye wi the wee wee bairn
That I heard greet sae sair?'
'There neer was a bairn into my room,
An as little designs to be;
'Twas but a stitch o my sair side,
Cam owre my fair bodie.'
'Rise up now, Marie,' quo the queen,
'Rise up, an come wi me,
For we maun ride to Holyrood,
A gay wedding to see.'
The queen was drest in scarlet fine,
Her maidens all in green;
An every town that they cam thro
Took Marie for the queen.
But little wist Marie Hamilton,
As she rode oure the lea,
That she was gaun to Edinbro town
Her doom to hear and dree.
When she cam to the Netherbow Port,
She laughed loud laughters three;
But when she reached the gallows-tree,
The tears blinded her ee.
'Oh aften have I dressed my queen,
An put gowd in her hair;
The gallows-tree is my reward,
An shame maun be my share!
'Oh aften hae I dressed my queen,
An saft saft made her bed;
An now I've got for my reward
The gallows-tree to tread!
'There's a health to all gallant sailors,
That sail upon the sea!
Oh never let on to my father and mither
The death that I maun dee!
'An I charge ye, all ye mariners,
When ye sail owre the main,
Let neither my father nor mither know
But that I'm comin hame.
'Oh little did my mither ken,
That day she cradled me,
What lands I was to tread in,
Or what death I should dee.
'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The nicht she'll hae but three;
There's Marie Seaton, an Marie Beaton,
An Marie Carmichael, an me.'

H[edit]

'WHAN I was a babe, and a very little babe,
And stood at my mither's knee,
Nae witch nor warlock did unfauld
The death I was to dree.
'But my mither was a proud woman,
A proud woman and a bauld;
And she hired me to Queen Mary's bouer,
When scarce eleven years auld.
'O happy, happy is the maid,
That's born of beauty free!
It was my dimpling rosy cheeks
That's been the dule o me;
And wae be to that weirdless wicht,
And a' his witcherie!'
Word's gane up and word's gane doun,
An word's gane to the ha,
That Mary Hamilton was wi bairn,
An na body kend to wha.
But in and cam the queen hersel,
Wi gowd plait on her hair:
Says, Mary Hamilton, whare is the babe
That I heard greet sae sair?
'There is na babe within my bouer,
And I hope there neer will be;
But it's me wi a sair and sick colic,
And I'm just like to dee.'
But they looked up, they looked down,
Atween the bowsters and the wa,
It's there they got a bonnie lad-bairn,
But its life it was awa.
'Rise up, rise up, Mary Hamilton,
Rise up, and dress ye fine,
For you maun gang to Edinbruch,
And stand afore the nine.
'Ye'll no put on the dowie black,
Nor yet the dowie brown;
But ye'll put on the robes o red,
To sheen thro Edinbruch town.'
'I'll no put on the dowie black,
Nor yet the dowie brown;
But I'll put on the robes o red,
To sheen thro Edinbruch town.'
As they gaed thro Edinbruch town,
And down by the Nether-bow,
There war monie a lady fair
Siching and crying, Och how!
'O weep nae mair for me, ladies,
Weep nae mair for me!
Yestreen I killed my ain bairn,
The day I deserve to dee.
'What need ye hech and how, ladies?
What need ye how for me?
Ye never saw grace at a graceless face,
Queen Mary has nane to gie.'
'Gae forward, gae forward,' the queen she said,
'Gae forward, that ye may see;
For the very same words that ye hae said
Sall hang ye on the gallows-tree.'
As she gaed up the Tolbooth stairs,
She gied loud lauchters three;
But or ever she cam down again,
She was condemnd to dee.
'O tak example frae me, Maries,
O tak example frae me,
Nor gie your luve to courtly lords,
Nor heed their witchin' ee.
'But wae be to the Queen hersel,
She micht hae pardond me;
But sair she's striven for me to hang
Upon the gallows-tree.
'Yestreen the Queen had four Maries,
The nicht she'll hae but three;
There was Mary Beatoun, Mary Seaton,
And Mary Carmichael, and me.
'Aft hae I set pearls in her hair,
Aft hae I lac'd her gown,
And this is the reward I now get,
To be hangd in Edinbruch town!
'O a' ye mariners, far and near,
That sail ayont the faem,
O dinna let my father and mither ken
But what I am coming hame!
'O a' ye mariners, far and near,
That sail ayont the sea,
Let na my father and mither ken
The death I am to dee!
'Sae, weep na mair for me. ladies,
Weep na mair for me;
The mither that kills her ain bairn
Deserves weel for to dee.'

I[edit]

MARIE HAMILTON's to the kirk gane,
Wi ribbons in her hair;
The king thought mair o Marie Hamilton
Than ony that were there.
Marie Hamilton's to the kirk gane,
Wi ribbons on her breast;
The king thought mair o Marie Hamilton
Then he listend to the priest.
Marie Hamilton's to the kirk gane,
Wi gloves upon her hands;
The king thought mair o Marie Hamilton,
Than the queen and a' her lands.
She hadna been about the king's court
A month, but barely one,
 Till she was beloved by a' the king's court,
And the king the only man.
She hadna been about the king's court
A month, but barely three,
Till frae the king's court Marie Hamilton,
Marie Hamilton durstna be.
The king is to the Abbey gane,
To pu the Abbey-tree,
To scale the babe frae Marie's heart,
But the thing it wadna be.
O she has rowd it in her apron,
And set it on the sea:
'Gae sink ye, or swim ye, bonny babe!
Ye's get nae mair o me.'
Word is to the kitchen gane,
And word is to the ha,
And word is to the noble room,
Amang the ladyes a',
That Marie Hamilton's brought to bed,
And the bonny babe's mist and awa.
Scarcely had she lain down again,
And scarcely fa'en asleep,
When up then started our gude queen,
Just at her bed-feet,
Saying, Marie Hamilton, where's your babe?
For I am sure I heard it greet.
'O no, O no, my noble queen,
Think no such thing to be!
'Twas but a stitch into my side,
And sair it troubles me.'
'Get up, get up, Marie Hamilton,
Get up and follow me;
For I am going to Edinburgh town,
A rich wedding for to see.'
O slowly, slowly raise she up,
And slowly put she on,
And slowly rode she out the way,
Wi mony a weary groan.
The queen was clad in scarlet,
Her merry maids all in green,
And every town that they cam to,
They took Marie for the queen.
'Ride hooly, hooly, gentlemen,
Ride hooly now wi me!
For never, I am sure, a wearier burd
Rade in your cumpanie.'
But little wist Marie Hamilton,
When she rade on the brown,
That she was gaen to Edinburgh town,
And a' to be put down.
'Why weep ye so, ye burgess-wives,
Why look ye so on me?
O I am going to Edinburgh town
A rich wedding for to see!'
When she gaed up the Tolbooth stairs,
The corks frae her heels did flee;
And lang or eer she cam down again
She was condemnd to die.
When she cam to the Netherbow Port,
She laughed loud laughters three;
But when she cam to the gallows-foot,
The tears blinded her ee.
'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Marie Seaton, and Marie Beaton,
And Marie Carmichael, and me.
'O often have I dressed my queen,
And put gold upon her hair;
But now I've gotten for my reward
The gallows to be my share.
'Often have I dressd my queen,
And often made her bed;
But now I've gotten for my reward
The gallows-tree to tread.
'I charge ye all, ye mariners,
When ye sail ower the faem,
Let neither my father nor mother get wit
But that I'm coming hame!
'I charge ye all, ye mariners,
That sail upon the sea,
Let neither my father nor mother get wit
This dog's death I'm to die!
For if my father and mother got wit,
And my bold brethren three,
O mickle wad be the gude red blude
This day wad be spilt for me!
'O little did my mother ken,
That day she cradled me,
The lands I was to travel in,
Or the death I was to die!'

J[edit]

My mother was a proud, proud woman,
A proud, proud woman and a bold;
She sent me to Queen Marie's bour,
When scarcely eleven years old.
Queen Marie's bread it was sae sweet,
An her wine it was sae fine,
That I hae lien in a young man's arms,
An I rued it aye synsyne.
Queen Marie she cam doon the stair,
Wi the goud kamis in her hair:
'Oh whare oh whare is the wee wee babe
I heard greetin sae sair?'
'It's no a babe, a babie fair,
Nor ever intends to be;
But I mysel, wi a sair colic,
Was seek and like to dee.'
They socht the bed baith up an doon,
Frae the pillow to the straw,
An there they got the wee wee babe,
But its life was far awa.
'Come doon, come doon, Marie Hamilton,
Come doon and speak to me;
. . . .
. . . .
'You'll no put on your dowie black,
Nor yet your dowie broun;
But you'll put on your ried, ried silk,
To shine through Edinborough toun.'

  • * * * *

'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The nicht she'll hae but three;
There was Marie Bethune, an Marie Seaton,
An Marie Carmichael, an me.
'Ah, little did my mother ken,
The day she cradled me,
The lands that I sud travel in,
An the death that I suld dee.'
Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The nicht she has but three;
For the bonniest Marie amang them a'
Was hanged upon a tree.

K[edit]

QUEEN MARY had four serving-maids,
As braw as braw could be,
But ane o them has fa'n wi bairn,
And for it she maun die.
But whan the babie it was born,
A troubled woman was she;
She rowed it up in a handkerchief,
And flang it in the sea.
Out then spoke a bonnie wee burd,
And it spak sharp and keen:
'O what did ye do wi your wee babie,
Ye had in your arms yestreen?'
'O I tyed it up in a napkin,
And flang it in the sea;
I bade it sink, I bade it soom,
'Twad get nae mair o me.'
Out and spak King Henrie,
And an angry man was he:
'A' for the drowning o that wee babe
High hanged ye shall be.'

  • * * * *

'I'll no put on a goun o black,
Nor yet a goun o green,
But I'll put on a goun o gowd,
To glance in young men's een.
'O gin ye meet my father or mother,
Ye may tell them frae me,
'Twas for the sake o a wee wee bairn
That I came here to die.
'Yestreen four Maries made Queen Mary's bed,
This nicht there'll be but three,
A Mary Beaton, a Mary Seaton,
A Mary Carmichael, and me.
'O what will my three brithers say,
When they come hame frae see,
When they see three locks o my yellow hair
Hinging under a gallows-tree!'

L[edit]

DOUN and cam the queen hersell,
Wi the goud links in her hair:
'O what did ye do wi the braw lad bairn
That I heard greet sae sair?
'There was never a babe into my room,
Nor ever intends to be;
It was but a fit o the sair colic,
That was like to gar me die.'
Doun and cam the king himsell,
And an angry man was he:
'If ye had saved that braw child's life,
It might hae been an honour to thee.'
They socht the chamer up and doun,
And in below the bed,
And there they fand a braw lad-bairn
Lying lapperin in his blood.
She rowed it up in her apron green,
And threw it in the sea:
'Een sink or swim, you braw lad bairn!
Ye'll neer get mair o me.'

  • * * * *

When she gaed up the Cannogate,
She gied loud lauchters three;
But or she cam to the Cowgate Head
The tears did blind her ee.
'Come a' ye jovial sailors,
That sail upon the sea,
Tell neither my father nor mother
The death that I'm to die!
'Come a' ye jovial sailors,
That sail upon the main,
See that ye tell baith my father and mother
That I'm coming sailing hame!
'My father he's the Duke of York,
And my mother's a gay ladie,
And I mysell a pretty fair lady,
And the king fell in love with me.'

M[edit]

THEN down cam Queen Marie,
Wi gold links in her hair,
Saying, Marie Mild, where is the child,
That I heard greet sae sair?
'There was nae child wi me, madam,
There was nae child wi me;
It was but me in a sair cholic,
When I was like to die.'
'I'm not deceived,' Queen Marie said,
'No, no, indeed not I!
So Marie Mild, where is the child?
For sure I heard it cry.'
She turned down the blankets fine,
Likewise the Holland sheet,
And underneath, there strangled lay
A lovely baby sweet.
'O cruel mother,' said the queen,
'Some fiend possessed thee;
But I will hang thee for this deed,
My Marie tho thou be!'

  • * * * *

When she cam to the Netherbow Port
She laught loud laughters three;
But when she cam to the gallows-foot,
The saut tear blinded her ee.
'Yestreen the Queen had four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Marie Seton, and Marie Beaton,
And Marie Carmichael, and me.
'Ye mariners, ye mariners,
That sail upon the sea,
Let not my father or mother wit
The death that I maun die!
'I was my parents' only hope,
They neer had ane but me;
They little thought when I left hame,
They should nae mair me see!'

N[edit]

THE streen the queen had four Maries,
This nicht she'll hae but three;
There's Mary Heaton, an Mary Beaton,
An Mary Michel, an me,
An I mysel was Mary Mild,
An flower oer a' the three.
Mary's middle was aye sae neat,
An her clothing aye sae fine,
It caused her lie in a young man's airms,
An she's ruet it aye sin syne.
She done her doon yon garden green,
To pull the deceivin tree,
For to keep back that young man's bairn,
But forward it would be.
'Ye winna put on the dowie black,
Nor yet will ye the broon,
But ye'll put on the robes o red,
To shine through Edinburgh toon.'
She hasna pitten on the dowie black,
Nor yet has she the broon,
But she's pitten on the robes o red,
To shine thro Edinburgh toon.
When she came to the mariners' toon,
The mariners they were playin,
. . . .
. . . .
'Ye needna play for me, mariners,
Ye needna play for me;
Ye never saw grace in a graceless face,
For there's nane therein to be.
'Seven years an I made Queen Mary's bed,
Seven years an I combed her hair,
An a hansome reward noo she's gien to me,
Gien me the gallows-tows to wear!
'Oh little did my mither think,
The day she cradled me,
What road I'd hae to travel in,
Or what death I'd hae to dee!'

O[edit]

THERE lived a lord into the south,
And he had dochters three,
And the youngest o them went to the king's court,
To learn some courtesie.
She rowd it in a wee wee clout
. . .
. . . .
. . . .
She rowd it in a wee wee clout
And flang't into the faem,
Saying, sink ye soon, my bonny babe!
I'll go a maiden hame.
'O woe be to you, ye ill woman,
An ill death may ye die!
Gin ye had spared the sweet baby's life,
It might hae been an honour to thee.'
She wadna put on her gowns o black,
Nor yet wad she o brown,
But she wad put on her gowns o gowd,
To glance through Embro town.
'Come saddle not to me the black,' she says,
'Nor yet to me the brown,
But come saddle to me the milk-white steed,
That I may ride in renown.'

P[edit]

MY father's the duke of Argyll,
My mither's a lady gay,
And I mysel am a dainty dame,
And the king desired me.
schawd [me] up, he schawed me doun,
He schawd me to the ha;
He schawd me to the low cellars,
And that was waurst of a'.

Q[edit]

THE Duke of York was my father,
My mother a lady free,
Myself a dainty damosell,
Queen Marie sent for me.
The queen's meat it was sae sweet,
Her cleiding it was sae rare,
It gart me grien for sweet Willie,
And I'll rue it evermair.

R[edit]

LITTLE did my mother think,
That day she cradled me,
What land I was to travel in,
Or what death I should die!

S[edit]

There lived a lord into the South,
An he had daughters three;
The youngest o them's gaen to the king's court,
To learn some courtesie.
She had na been in the king's court
A twelvemonth an a day,
When word is thro the kitchen gaen,
An likewise thro the ha,
That Mary Moil was gane wi child
To the highest steward of a'.
She rowd it into a basket
An flang 't into the sea,
Saying, Sink ye soon, my bonny babe,
Ye'se neer get mair o me.
She rowd it into a basket
An flang 't into the faem,
Saying, Sink ye soon, my bonny babe,
I'se gang a maiden hame.
O whan the news cam to the king
An angry man was he;
He has taen the table wi his foot,
An in flinders gart it flie.
'O woe be to you, ye ill woman,
An ill death may ye die!
Gin ye had spared the sweet baby's life,
It might have been an honour to thee.
'O busk ye, busk ye, Mary Moil,
O busk, and gang wi me,
For agen the morn at ten o clock
A rare sight ye sall see.'
She wadna put on her gown o black,
Nor yet wad she o brown,
But she wad put on her gown o gowd,
To glance thro Embro town.
O whan she cam to the Netherbow Port
She gied loud laughters three,
But whan she cam to the gallows-foot
The tear blinded her ee.
Saying, O ye mariners, mariners,
That sail upon the sea,
Let not my father nor mother to wit
The death that I maun die.
'For little did father or mother wit,
The day they cradled me,
What foreign lands I should travel in,
Or what death I should die.
'Yestreen the Queen had four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Mary Seton, an Mary Beaton,
An Mary Carmichael, an me.'

T[edit]

There was a duke, and he dwelt in York,
And he had daughters three;
One of them was an hostler-wife,
And two were gay ladies.
O word's gane to Queen Mary's court,
As fast as it coud gee,
That Mary Hamilton's born a bairn,
And the baby they coud na see.
Then came the queen and a' her maids,
Swift tripping down the stair:
'Where is the baby, Mary,
That we heard weep sae sair?'
'O say not so, Queen Mary,
Nor bear ill tales o me,
For this is but a sore sickness
That oft times troubles me.'
They sought it up, they sought it down,
They sought it below the bed,
And there the[y] saw the bonny wee babe,
Lying wallowing in its bluid.
'Now busk ye, busk ye, Mary Hamilton,
Busk ye and gang wi me,
For I maun away to Edinbro town,
A rich wedding to see.'
Mary wad na put on the black velvet,
Nor yet wad put on the brown,
But she's put on the red velvet,
To shine thro Edinbro town.
When she came unto the town,
And near the Tolbooth stair,
There stood many a lady gay,
Weeping for Mary fair.
'O haud yeer tongue[s], ye ladys a',
And weep na mair for me!
O haud yeer tongues, ye ladys a',
For it's for my fault I dee.
'The king he took me on his knee
And he gae three drinks to me,
And a' to put the babie back,
But it wad na gang back for me.
'O ye mariners, ye mariners a',
That sail out-owr the sea,
Let neither my father nor mother get wit
What has become o me!
'Let neither my father nor mother ken,
Nor my bauld brethren three,
For muckle wad be the gude red bluid
That wad be shed for me.
'Aft hae I laced Queen Mary's back,
Aft hae I kaimed her hair,
And a' the reward she's gein to me 's
The gallows to be my heir.
'Yestreen the queen had four Marys,
The night she'l hae but three;
There was Mary Seatoun, and Mary Beatoun,
An Mary Carmichal, an me.'

U[edit]

'My father was the Duke of York,
My mother a gay ladye,
And I myself a daintie dame;
The queen she sent for me.
'But the queen's meat it was sae sweet,
And her clothing was sae rare,
It made me long for a young man's bed,
And I rued it evermair.'
But worid is up, and word is down,
Amang the ladyes a',
That Marie's born a babe sin yestreen,
That babe it is awa.
But the queen she gat wit of this,
She calld for a berry-brown gown,
And she's awa to Marie's bower,
The bower that Marie lay in.
'Open your door, my Marie,' she says,
'My bonny and fair Marie;
They say you have born a babe sin yestreen,
That babe I fain wad see.'
'It is not sae wi me, madam,
It is not sae wi me;
It is but a fit of my sair sickness,
That oft times troubles me.'
'Get up, get up, my Marie,' she says,
'My bonny and fair Marie,
And we'll away to Edinburgh town,
And try the verity.'
Slowly, slowly, gat she up,
And slowly pat she on,
And slowly went she to that milk-steed,
To ride to Edinburgh town.
But when they cam to Edinburgh,
And in by the Towbooth stair,
There was mony a virtuous ladye
Letting the tears fa there.
'Why weep ye sae for me, madams?
Why weep ye sae for me?
For sin ye brought me to this town
This death ye gar me die.'
When she cam to the Netherbow Port,
She gae loud laughters three;
But when she cam to the gallows-foot
The tear blinded her ee.
'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Marie Seton, and Marie Beatoun,
And Marie Carmichael, and me.
'My love he was a pottinger,
Mony drink he gae me,
And a' to put back that bonnie babe,
But alas! it wad na do.
'I pat that bonny babe in a box,
And set it on the sea;
O sink ye, swim ye, bonny babe!
Ye's neer get mair o me.
'O all ye jolly sailors,
That sail upon the sae,
Let neither my father nor mother ken
The death that I maun die.
'But if my father and mother kend
The death that I maun die,
O mony wad be the good red guineas
That wad be gien for me.'

V[edit]

'My father was the Duke of York,
My mother the gay ladie,
An I myself a maiden bright,
An the queen desired me.'
But there word gane to the kitchen,
There's word gane to the ha,
That Mary mild she gangs wi child
To the uppermost stewart of a'.
Than they sought but, and they sou[ght] ben,
They sought aneath the bed,
An there the fand the bonnie lad-bairn,
Lyin lappin in his blood.
'Gae buss ye, Marie Hamilton,
Gae buss ye, buss ye bra,
For ye maun away to Edin[brough] town,
The queen's birthday . . '.'
She wadna put on her black, bla[ck] silk,
Nor wad she put on the brown,
But she pat on the glisterin stufs,
To glister in Edinbrough town.
An whan she cam to the water-gate
Loud laughters gae she three,
But whan she cam to the Netherbow Port
The tear blinded Marie's ee
'Twas up than spak Queen Marie's nurse,
An a sorry woman was she:
'Whae sae clever o fit and ready o wit
Has telld sic news o thee!'
'Oft have I Queen Marie's head
Oft have I caimd her hair,
An a' the thanks I've gotten for that
Is the gallows to be my heir!
'Oft have I dressd Queen Marie's head,
An laid her in her bed,
An a' the thanks I've gotten for that
Is the green gallows-tree to tread!
'O spare, O spare, O judge,' she cried,
'O spair a day for me!'
'There is nae law in our land, ladie,
To let a murderer be.'
'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Marie Seaton, and Ma[rie] Bea[ton],
An Marie Carmichael, an me.
'O if my father now but kend
The death that I'm to die,
O muckle, muckle wad be the red gowd
That he wad gie for me.
'An if my brothers kend the death
That I am now to die,
O muckle, muckle wad be the red blood
That wad be shed for me.'

W[edit]

There lived a man in the North Countree
And he had doghters three;
The youngest o them's to Edinbourgh gaen,
Ane o the queen's Marys to be.
Queen Mary's bread it was sae white,
And her wine it ran sae clear,
It shewed her the way to the butler's bed,
And I wait she's bought dear.
For Mary's to the garden gaen,
To eat o the saven tree,
And a' 's to pit her young son back,
But back he wad na be.
So Mary's to her chamber gaen,
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Queen Mary she came down the stair,
And a' her maids afore her:
'Oh, Mary Miles, where is the child
That I have heard greet sae sore O?'
'There is no child with me, madam,
There is no child with me;
It was only a bit of a cholick I took,
And I thought I was gawen to dee.'
So they looked up, and they looked down,
And they looked beneath the bed-foot,
And there they saw a bonnie boy,
Lying weltering in his blood.
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
'Since that you have killed your own dear child,
The same death you shall dee.'
When Mary came afore the court,
A loud laugh laughed she;
But when she came to the [gallows-]fit
The tear blinded her ee.

  • * * * * * *

'O wha will comb Queen Mary's heed?
Or wha will brade her hair?
And wha will lace her middle sae jimp
Whan [I] am nae langer there?
'Yestreen the queen [had] four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Mary Seaten, and Mary Beaten,
And Mary Carmichal, and me.

  • * * * * * *

'I'll not put on my robes of black,
Nor yet my robes of brown,
But I'll put on a shining braw garb,
That will shine thro Edinbourgh town.'

  • * * * * * *

Oh, whan she came to the Cannongate,
The Cannongate sae hee,
There mony a lord and belted knight
Was grieved for her beautee.

  • * * * * * *

And whan she came to [the] Hee Town,
The Hee Town sae hee,

  • * * * * * *

X[edit]

There livd a lord in the West Country,
And he had daughters three;
The youngest o them's to the queen's court,
To learn some courtesy.
She hadna been at the queen's court
A year but and a day
Till she has fa'n as big wi child,
As big as she coud gae.
She's gane into the garden
To pu the sycamore tree,
And taen the bony bairn in her arms
And thrown it in the sea.
She rowd it in her apron
And threw it in the sea:
'Gae sink or soom, my bony sweet babe,
Ye'll never get mair o me.'
Then in an came Queen Mary,
Wi gowd rings on her hair:
'O Mary mild, where is the child
That I heard greet sae sair?'
'It wasna a babe, my royal liege,
Last night that troubled me,
But it was a fit o sair sickness,
And I was lyken to dee.'
'O hold yere tongue, Mary Hamilton,
Sae loud as I hear ye lee!
For I'll send you to Enbro town,
The verity to see.'
She wadna put on the ribbons o black,
Nor yet wad she the brown,
But she wad put on the ribbons o gowd,
To gae glittring through Enbro town.
As she rade up the Sands o Leith,
Riding on a white horse,
O little did she think that day
To die at Enbro Corss!
As she rade up the Cannongate,
She leugh loud laughters three,
And mony a lord and lady said,
'Alas for that lady!'
'Ye needna say Oh, ye needna cry Eh,
Alas for that lady!
Ye'll neer see grace in a graceless face,
As little ye'll see in me.'
When she came to the Netherbow Port,
She leugh loud laughters three,
But ere she came to the gallows-foot
The tear blinded her eie;
Saying, Tye a white napkin owr my face,
For that gibbet I downa see.
'O hold yere hand, Lord Justice!
O hold it a little while!
I think I see my ain true-love
Come wandring mony a mile.
'O have ye brought me ony o my gowd?
Or ony o my weel-won fee?
Or are ye come to see me hangd,
Upon this gallows-tree?'
'O I hae brought ye nane o yere gowd,
Nor nane o yere weel-won fee,
But I am come to see ye hangd,
And hangit ye shall be.'
'O all ye men and mariners,
That sail for wealth or fame,
Let never my father or mother get wit
But what I'm coming hame.
'O all ye men and mariners,
That sail upon the sea,
Let never my father or mother get wit
The death that I maun dee.
'Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
The night she'll hae but three;
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton,
And Mary Carmichael, and me.'

Y[edit]

'Yestreen the queen had four Marys,
The night she'll hae but three;
She had Mary Beaton, and Mary Seaton,
And Mary Carmichael, and me.
'My feather was the Duke of York,
My mother a gay lady,
And I mysell a bonnie young may,
And the king fell in love we me.
'The king's kisses they were so sweet,
And his wine it was so strong,
That I became a mother
Before fifteen years old.'
'O tell the truth now, Mary,
And sett this matter right;
What hae ye made o the babey
Was greeting yesternight?'
'O I will tell you, madam the queen,
I winna tell a lie;
I put it in a bottomless boat
And bad it sail the sea.'
'Ye lie, ye lie now, Mary,
Sae loud's I hear you lie!
You wasnae out o the palace,
So that coud never be.'
'Weel I will tell you, madam,
Though it should gar me weep;
I stabbd it we my little pen-knife,
And bad it take a sleep.'
When she came up the Netherbow,
She geed loud laughters three;
But when she came out o the Parliament Close
The tear blinded her ee.
'O little does my feather ken
The death I am to die,
Or muckel wad be the red, red gould
Wad be payed doun for me.
'O little does my mother think
The death that I am to die,
Or monie wad be the saut, saut tears
That she wad shed for me.
'O never lett my brothers ken
The death that I am to die,
For muckel wad be the red, red blood
That wad be shed for me.
'Aft hae I washd the king's bonnie face,
Kaimd doun his yellow hair,
And this is a' the reward he's geen me,
The gallows to be my share.'

Z[edit]

'Buss ye, bonny Marie Hamilton,
Buss and gae wi me,
For ye maun gae to Edinborough,
A great wedding to see.'
'Ride hooly, hooly, gentlemen,
Ride hooly now wi me,
For never, I'm sure, a wearier bride
Rode in your cumpany.'
Little wist Marie Hamilton,
When she rode on the brown,
That she was gawn to Edinborough,
And a' to be put down.
When she came to the Council stairs,
She ga loud laughters three;
But or that she came down again
She was condemmd to dee.
'O ye mariners, mariners, mariners,
When ye sail oer the faem,
Let never my father nor mother to wit
But I'm just coming hame.
'Let never my father nor mother to wit,
Nor my bauld brether[en] three,
Or meckle wad be the red, red gowd
This day be gien for me.
'Let never my father or mother to wit,
Nor my bauld brethren three,
Or meckle war the red, red blude
This day wad fa for me.'


[Aa]: Mary Hamilton

[Aa].1Oft hae I kaimd Queen Mary's head,
An oft hae I curld her hair,
An now I hae gotten for my reward
A gallows to be heir.'


[Bb]: Mary Hamilton

[Bb].1Yestreen the queen had four Maries,
But the nicht she'll hae but three;
There was Mary Beaton, and Mary Seaton,
And Mary Carmichell, and me.
[Bb.2]Oh little did my mither think,
At nicht when she cradled me,
That I wad sleep in a nameless grave
And hang on the gallows-tree.
Yestreen, etc.
[Bb.3]They'll tie a kerchief round my een,
And they'll na let me see t' dee,
And they'll spread my story thro a' the land,
Till it reaches my ain countrie.
[Bb.4]I wish I micht sleep in the auld kirkyard,
Beneath the hazel tree,
Where aft we played in the long simmer nichts,
My brithers and sisters and me.