Child's Ballads/280

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A[edit]

SHIPERDRR-rrBOY, what is yer trade?
Or what way do ye wine yer bread?
Or what way do ye wine yer bread,
Fan the kipeng nout gies over?
'Spindels an forls it is my trade,
An bits o sticks to them who need,
Whilk is a gentell trade indeed;
Bony lassie, cane ye lea me?'
'I lea you as I supos
Rachell loved Jacob of old,
As Jason loied his flice of gould,
Sae dearly do I lea ye.
'Ye cast off yer clouty coat,
An ye pitt one my scarlett cloke,
An I will follou you just att the back,
Becass ye are a bonny laddie.'
He cust off his cloutty coat,
An he patt on her scarlet cloke,
An she folloued him just att the back,
Becaus he was a bonny laddie.
They gaed on, an forder on,
Till they came to yon borrous-toun;
She bought a loaf an they both satt doun,
Bat she ate no we her laddie.
They gaed on, an forder one,
Till they came to the nest borrous-toun;
I wat the lassie louked doun,
For the following of her laddie.
'O if I wer on the head of yon hill,
Ther I wad greet my fill,
For the follouing of my laddie.'
'O had yer toung, my dearest dear,
I ill ha ye back as I brought ye hear,
For I canna bear yer morning.'
'O had yer toung, my dearest dear,
I will gae throu the warld baith far an near,
Becaus ye'r a bonny ladie.'
They gad on, an forder on,
Till they came to his father's haa,
An he knoked ther fue loudly.
'O had ye hand, my dear[est] dear,
An dou not knoke sae loudly,
For fear they sud be angry.'
Four-an-tuenty gentelmen
They conved the beager ben,
An as mony gay lad s
Conved the beager's lassie.
His brother lead her throu the haa:
'I wis, brother, we had beagged a',
For sick a bonny lassie.'
That smae night she was bedded,
An the nist morning she was wedded;
She came to gued by grait misgiding,
By the follouing of her laddie.

B[edit]

'TWAS on a day in the month o June
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
When Phoebus shines sae clearly.
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
She says, My dear, what is your trade
When thiggin ye give over?
'Spinls and forls is my trade,
Wi bits o sticks I win my bread,
An O it is a winnin trade;
Bonnie lassie, can ye loo me?'
An O it is, etc.
'O I can love ye manyfold,
As Jacob loved Rachel of old,
And as Jessie loved the cups o gold;
My dear, can ye believe me?'
As Jessie, etc.
'It's ye'll tak aff the robes o red,
An ye'll pit on the beggin-weed,
An ye'll gang wi me an ye'll beg your bread,
An ye'll be the beggar's dawtie.'
When they cam to yon borough-toon,
They bocht a loaf an they baith sat doon,
They bocht a loaf an they baith sat doon,
An the lassie ate wi her laddie.
When they cam to yon grassy hill,
Where spotted flocks do feed their fill,
'I'll sit me doon an I'll greet a while,
For the followin o my laddie.'
'It's ye'll tak aff yer beggin-weed,
An ye'll pit on the goons o red,
An ye-ll gang ye back the road ye cam
For I canna bide yer greetin.'
'Betide me weel, betide me woe,
It's wi the beggar an I'll go,
An I'll follow him through frost an snow,
An I'll be the beggar's dawtie.'
When they cam to yonder ha,
He knockit loud an sair did ca;
She says, My dear, we'll be foun in fa
For knockin here sae loudly.
Four-an-twenty gentlemen
Cam a' to welcome the beggar in,
An as monie fair ladies gay
To welcome 's bonnie lassie.
When at he gied through the ha,
Tney a' did laugh, they were like to fa,
Sayin, Brither, I wish we had beggit a',
For sic a bonnie lassie.
'The streen ye was the beggar's bride,
An noo this nicht ye'll lie by my side,
Come weel, come woe, whateer betide,
An ye'll be aye my dawtie.'

C[edit]

DOWN in yonder garden gay,
Where many a ladie does repair,
Where many a ladie does repair,
Puing of flowers sae bonnie.
'O do you see yon shepherd's son,
Feeding his flocks in yonder loan,
Feeding his flocks in yonder loan?
Vow but he feeds them bonnie!'
'O laddie, laddie, what is your trade?
Or by what means do you win your bread?
Or by what means do you win your bread?
O laddie, tell unto me.'
'By making spindles is my trade,
Or whorles in the time o need,
And by which ways I do win my bread:
O lady, do you love me?'
'As Judas loved a piece of gold,
As Jacob loved Rachel of old,
As Jacob loved Rachel of old,
O laddie, I do love thee.'
'You must put off your robes of silk,
You must put on my cloutit claes,
And follow me hard at by back,
And ye'll be my beggar-lassie.'
She's put aff her robes of silk,
And sh's put on his cloutit claes,
And she's followed him hard at his back,
And she's been his beggar-lassie.
O when they cam to [the] borrowstoun,
Vow but the lassie lookit doun!
Vow but the lassie lookit doun!
Following her beggar-laddie.
O when they cam to Stirling toun,
He coft a loaf and they baith sat doun,
He coft a loaf and they baith sat doun,
And she's eaten wi her beggar-laddie.
'O do you see yon hie, hie hill,
Where the corn grows baith rank and tall?
If I was ther, I would greet my fill,
Where naebody wuld see me.'
When they came to his brother's hall,
Vow but he chappit loud and schill!
'Don't chap sea loud,' the lassie said,
'For we may be fund faut wi.'
r-and-twenty gentlemen,
And twice as many gay ladies,
And twice as many gay ladies,
Came to welcome in the lassie.
His brother led her thro the hall,
With laughter he was like to fall;
He said, I think we should beg it all,
For she is a bonnie lassie.
'You must put aff your cloutit claes,
You must put on your robes of silk,
You must put on your robes of silk,
For ye are a young knicht's ladye.'

D[edit]

'TWAS in the pleasant month of June,
When woods and valleys a' grow green,
And valiant ladies walk alane,
While Phoebus shines soe clearly.
And valiant ladies, etc.
Out-ower yon den I spied a swain,
Wi a shepherd's club into his han;
He was driving ewes out-ower yon knowes,
And said, Lassie, I could love you.
He was driving ewes, etc.
'Oh, I could love you manifold,
As Jacob lovd Rachel of old,
As Jesse lovd the fields of gold,
So dearly could I love you.
'In ha's and chambers ye'se be laid,
In silks and cambrics ye'se be clade,
An wi the finest ye'se be fed,
My dear, gin ye would believe me.'
'Your ha's and chambers ye'll soon sweep clean,
Wi your flattering tongue now let me alane;
You are designd to do me wrang,
Awa, young man, and leave me.
'But tell me now what is your trade,
When you've given over sheep and club?'
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
'By making besoms I win by bread,
And spindles and whorles in time o need;
Isn't that a gentle trade indeed?
Bonnie lassie, can you loe me?
'Will ye cast aff your mantle black
And put on you a clouty cloak,
And follow me close at the back,
The gaberlunyie-laddie?'
n she coost aff her mantle black,
And she put on a clouty cloak,
And she followd him close at the back,
Her gaberlunyie-laddie.
As they gaed through youn borough-town,
For shame the lassie lookit down,
But they bought a loaf and they both sat down,
And the lassie ate wi her laddie.
When they came to his father's gate,
Sae loudly as he rappd thereat;
'My dear,' said she, 'ye'll be found in faut
For rapping there sae loudly.'
Then four-and-twenty gentlemen
Convoyd the gentle beggar ben,
And aye as mony gay ladies
Convoyd the bonny lassie.
n they were come into the ha,
Wi laughter a' were like to fa:
'I wish, dear brother, we had begg d a',
For sic a bonnie lassie.'
Then as he stood amang them a',
He let his meal-pocks a' down fa,
And in red gowd he shone oer them a',
And she was a young knight's lady.
Yestreen she was the begger's bride,
As his wife she now stood by his side,
And for a' the lassie's ill misguide,
She's now the young knight's lady.

E[edit]

'TWAS in the merry month of June,
When woods and gardens were all in bloom,
When woods and gardens were all in bloom,
And Ph'qbus shining clearly.
Did you not see your shepherd-swain,
Feeding his flocks upon the plain,
Feeding his flocks all one by one,
And keeping them together?
Did you not see yon bonny green,
Where dukes and lords and my love hath been,
Where dukes and lords and my love hath been,
And Ph'qbus shining clearly?
'O shepherd, shepherd, tell me indeed
Which is the way you dou win your bread,
Which is the way you dou win your bread,
When feeding you give over?'
'By making spindles I win my bread,
By turning whorles in time of need,
By turning whorles in time of need,
Say, lassy, can you love me?'
'I could love you manifold,
As Jacob loved Rachel of old,
As Jacob loved Rachel of old,
So dearly could I love you.'
'You must cast off these robes of silk,
And put about my shepherd's cloak,
And you must walk down at my back,
Like a shepherd's bonny lassie.'
She has cast off her robes of silk,
And put about his shepherd's cloak,
And she has walkd down at his back,
Like a shepherd's bonny lassie.
O they walked up, and they walked down,
Till this fair maiden she's wearyed grown;
Says she, My dear, we'll go to some town,
And there tak up our lodgings.
O whan they cam to his father's gate,
Sae loudly, loudly as he did rap;
Says she, My dear, we'll be found in fault
For rapping here sae boldly.
But whan they cam to his father's hall,
O loud, loud laughter they laughed all,
Saying, Brother, I wish we had herded all,
Ye've got sic an a bonny lassie.
Now this young couple they were wed,
And all the way the flowers were spread,
For in disguise they were married;
She's now the young squire's lady.