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Executive Order 344-A

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The following is the description from the Department of War's General Order No. 130 of 1905, not the actual order text, which was in the form of an approval of a recommendation from the Acting Secretary of War.


The United States having acquired for fortification purposes, by conveyances from certain Indians, pursuant to agreement ratified by Congress on March 3, 1905 (33 Stat. L., 1078) (said conveyances being recorded in the auditor's office of Kitsap County, Washington, in Deed Book 43 at pages 764, 766, 768, and 769), the following-described lands, formerly constituting a portion of the Port Madison Indian Reservation on Agate Passage to Port Orchard, State of Washington, the same have, by order of the President, dated July 29, 1905, been declared a military reservation, viz:


Lots 4 and 5 of section 21, and lots 1 and 2 of section 28, township 26 north, range 2 east, Willamette meridian; bounded and described by metes and bounds as follows:


Beginning at a point on the westerly shore of Agate Passage, on line between sections twenty-eight (28) and twenty-nine (29), township twenty-six (26) north, range two (2) east of Willamette meridian; thence northerly on line between sections twenty-eight (28) and twenty-nine (29), in said township, two thousand three hundred and fifty-eight (2,358) feet, more or less, to the corner of sections twenty-eight (28), twenty-nine (29), twenty (20), and twenty-one (21), township twenty-six (26) north, range two (2) east; thence northerly on line between sections twenty (20) and twenty-one (21), in said township, one thousand three hundred and four and seventy-four one-hundredths (1.304.71) feet to the one-sixteenth (116) corner on line between sections twenty (20) and twenty-one (21); thence easterly through the center of the south half of section twenty-one (21), two thousand two hundred and thirty-one (2,231) feet, more or less, to the westerly shore of Agate Passage; thence southwesterly along the westerly shore line of Agate Passage to the place of beginning; containing seventy and fifty one-hundredths (70.51) acres, more or less.


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).