Homer's Iliads in English

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HOMER'S ILIADS. TRANSLATED OUT OF GREEK by THOMAS HOBBES OF MALMESBURY.
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LIB. I.
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The discontent and secession of Achilles.
O goddess sing what woe the discontent
Of Thetis’ son brought to the Greeks; what souls
Of heroes down to Erebus it sent,
Leaving their bodies unto dogs and fowls;
Hobbes1839: 5Whilst the two princes of the army strove,
King Agamemnon and Achilles stout.
That so it should be was the will of Jove,
But who was he that made them first fall out?
Apollo; who incensed by the wrong
Hobbes1839: 10To his priest Chryses by Atrides done,
Sent a great pestilence the Greeks among;
Apace they died, and remedy was none.
For Chryses came unto the Argive fleet,
With treasure great his daughter to redeem;
Hobbes1839: 15And having in his hands the ensigns meet,
That did the priestly dignity beseem,
A golden sceptre and a crown of bays,
Unto the princes all made his request;
But to the two Atrides chiefly prays,
Hobbes1839: 20Who of the Argive army were the best.
O sons of Atreus, may the Gods grant you
A safe return from Troy with victory;
And you on me compassion may shew,
Receive these gifts and set my daughter free;
Hobbes1839: 25And have respect to Jove’s and Leto’s son.
To this the princes all gave their consent,
Except King Agamemnon. He alone,
And with sharp language from the fleet him sent;
Old man, said he, let me not see you here
Hobbes1839: 30Now staying, or returning back again,
For fear the golden sceptre which you bear,
And chaplet hanging on it, prove but vain.
Your daughter shall to Argos go far hence,
And make my bed, and labour at the loom,
Hobbes1839: 35And take heed you no farther me incense,
Lest you return not safely to your home.
[2]
Frighted with this, away the old man went;
And often as he walked on the sand,
His prayers to Apollo up he sent.
Hobbes1839: 40Hear me, Apollo, with thy bow in hand,
That honour’d art in Tenedos and Chryse,
And unto whom Cylla great honour bears,
If thou accepted hast my sacrifice,
Pay th’ Argives with thy arrows for my tears.
Hobbes1839: 45His prayer was granted by the deity;
Who with his silver bow and arrows keen,
Descended from Olympus silently
In likeness of the sable night unseen.
His bow and quiver both behind him hang,
Hobbes1839: 50The arrows chink as often as he jogs,
And as he shot the bow was heard to twang,
And first his arrows flew at mules and dogs.
But when the plague into the army came,
Perpetual was the fire of funerals;
Hobbes1839: 55And so nine days continued the same.
Achilles on the tenth for counsel calls;
And Juno ’twas that put it in his head,
Who for the Argive army was afraid:
The lords to counsel being gathered,
Hobbes1839: 60Up stood Achilles, and thus to them said,
We must, I think, Atrides, run from hence,
Since war and plague consume us both at once,
Let’s think on how to stay the pestilence,
Or else at Troy resolve to leave our bones.
Hobbes1839: 65Let’s with some priest or prophet here advise,
That knows the pleasure of the gods above,
Or some that at expounding dreams are wise,
For also dreams descend on men from Jove:
That we may from him know Apollo’s mind,
Hobbes1839: 70If we for sacrifice be in arrear,
Or if he will for lambs and goats be kind,
And to destroy us from henceforth forbear.
Achilles then sat down, and Chalchas rose,
That was of great renown for augury,
Hobbes1839: 75And any thing was able to disclose,
That had been, is, or should hereafter be;
And guided had the Greeks to Ilium;
Achilles, said he, since you me command
To tell you why this plague is on us come,
Hobbes1839: 80Swear you will save me both with word and hand.
Of all the Greeks it will offend the best;
Who though his anger for awhile he smother,
Will not, I fear, long time contented rest,
But will revenged be some time or other.
Hobbes1839: 85Chalchas, replied Achilles, do not fear,
But what the god has told you bring to light:
[3]
By Phœbus, not a man shall hurt you here,
As long as I enjoy my life and sight;
Though Agamemnon be the man you dread,
Hobbes1839: 90Who is of all the army most obeyed.
The prophet by these words encouraged,
Said what before to say he was afraid.
’Tis not neglect of vow or sacrifice
That doth the God Apollo thus displease;
Hobbes1839: 95But that we do his priest so much despise,
As not his child for ransom to release.
And more, till she be to her father sent,
And with a hecatomb, and ransomless,
The anger of the god will not relent,
Hobbes1839: 100Nor will the sickness ’mongst the people cease.
This said, he sat. The king look’d furiously,
And anger flaming stood upon his eyes,
While many black thoughts on his heart did lie;
And to the prophet Chalchas thus replies:
Hobbes1839: 105Unlucky prophet, that didst never yet
Good fortune prophecy to me, but ill,
And ever with a mind against me set
Inventest prophecies to cross my will;
And now again you fain would have it thought,
Hobbes1839: 110Because I would not let Chryseis go,
The gifts refusing which her father brought,
Therefore this plague was sent amongst us now.
With Clytemnestra she may well contend,
For person, or for beauty, or for art;
Hobbes1839: 115Yet so, to send her home I do intend,
For of our loss I bear the greatest part.
But you must then some prize for me provide;
Shall no man unrewarded go but I?
This said, Achilles to the king replied,
Hobbes1839: 120Atrides, that on booty have your eye,
You know divided is, or sold the prey
Which never can resumed be again.
But send her home. When we shall have sack’d Troy,
Your loss shall be repaid with triple gain.
Hobbes1839: 125No, said Atrides, that I never meant;
D’ye think ’tis fit that you your shares retain?
And only mine unto the God be sent,
That unrewarded none but I remain?
I thought it reason th’ Argives should collect
Hobbes1839: 130Amongst themselves the value (how they list)
And give it me before they did expect
This prize of mine should be by me dismist.
If they’ll do that, ’tis well. If not, I’ll go
To your, or Ajax, or Ulysses’ tent,
Hobbes1839: 135And take his prize, and right myself will so,
Wherewith I think he will not be content.
[4]
But since there’s time enough to speak of this,
Let’s ready make a ship with able rowers,
And th’ hecatomb, to go with fair Chryseis,
Hobbes1839: 140And, to direct, one of the counsellors;
Ajax, Idomeneus, Ulysses, or
Yourself may go, Achilles, if you please,
And do the business you are pleading for,
And, if you can, th’ offended God appease.
Hobbes1839: 145O impudence! Achilles then replied,
What other of th’ Achæans willingly,
Will, when you only for yourself provide,
Go where you bid, or fight with th’ enemy?
Against the Trojans I no quarrel have.
Hobbes1839: 150In Pthia plund’ring they were never seen,
Nor ever thence my kine or horses drave,
Nor could; the sea and great hills are between.
Only for yours and Menelaus’ sake,
To honour gain for you we came to Troy,
Hobbes1839: 155Whereof no notice, dogs-head, now you take,
But threaten me my prize to take away;
Which by my labour I have dearly bought,
And by th’ Achæans given me has been.
And when the city Troy we shall have got,
Hobbes1839: 160Your share will great, mine little be therein.
For though my part be greatest in the pain,
Yet when unto division we come,
You will expect the greatest part o’ th’ gain,
And that with little I go weary home.
Hobbes1839: 165Then farewell Troy. To sea I’ll go again,
And back to Pthia. Then it will be seen
When you without me shall at Troy remain,
What honour and what riches you shall win.
Go when you will, said Agamemnon, fly,
Hobbes1839: 170I’ll not entreat you for my sake to stay.
When you are gone more honour’d shall be I,
Nor Jove, I hope, will with you go away.
In you I shall but lose an enemy
That only loves to quarrel and to fight.
Hobbes1839: 175The Gods have given you strength I not deny.
Go ’mongst your myrmidons and use your might.
I care not for you, nor your anger fear,
For after I have sent away Chryseis,
And satisfi’d the God, I’ll not forbear
Hobbes1839: 180To fetch away from you the fair Briseis,
And that by force. For I would have you see
How much to mine inferior is your might,
And others fear t’ oppose themselves to me.
This swell’d Achilles’ choler to the height,
Hobbes1839: 185And made him study what to do were best,
To draw his sword and Agamemnon kill,
[5]
Or take some time his anger to digest.
His sword was drawn, yet doubtful was his will.
But Juno, that of both of them took care,
Hobbes1839: 190Sent Pallas down, who coming stood behind
Achilles, and laid hold upon his hair.
Whereat Achilles wond’ring in his mind,
Turn’d back, and by the terror of her eyes
Knew her; but by none else perceiv’d was she.
Hobbes1839: 195Come you, said he, to see the injuries
That are by Agamemnon done to me?
So great, O Goddess Pallas, is his pride,
As I believe it cost him will his life.
I hither came, Athena then reply’d,
Hobbes1839: 200To put an end to this unlucky strife.
From heaven I hither was by Juno sent,
That loves you both, and of you both takes care,
Drawing of swords and bloodshed to prevent.
But as for evil words you need not spare.
Hobbes1839: 205For the wrong done you he shall trebly pay
Another time. Hold then. Your sword forbear.
I must then, said Achilles, you obey,
Tho’ wrong’d. Who hears not Gods, the Gods not hear.
This said, his mighty sword again he sheath’d,
Hobbes1839: 210And Pallas up unto Olympus flew.
Achilles still nothing but choler breath’d,
And Agamemnon thus revil’d anew.
Dog’s-face, and drunkard, coward that thou art,
That hat’st to lead the people out to fight;
Hobbes1839: 215Nor yet to lie in ambush hast the heart,
And painfully watch in the field all night.
But thou to take from other men their due,
Safe lying in the camp, more pleasure hast.
But fools they are that ruled are by you,
Hobbes1839: 220Or else this injury had been your last.
But this I’ll say, and with an oath make good.
(Now by this sceptre, which hath left behind
The stock whereon it once grew in the wood,
And never more shall have nor leaf nor rind,
Hobbes1839: 225And by Achæan princes now is borne
By whom Jove’s laws to th’ people carried be.)
You hear now what a great oath I have sworn:
If ere the Acheans shall have need of me,
And Agamemnon cannot them relieve,
Hobbes1839: 230When Hector fills the field with bodies slain,
And Agamemnon only for them grieve,
They my assistance wish for shall in vain.
This said, Achilles threw the sceptre down
That stuck all over was with nails of gold;
Hobbes1839: 325And Nestor rose, of Pyle that wore the crown,
Wise and sweet orator and captain old.
[6]
His words like honey dropped from his tongue.
Two ages he in battle honour gain’d.
For all that while he youthful was and strong,
Hobbes1839: 240And with the third age now in Pyle he reign’d.
What grief t’ Achæa coming is, said he,
O Gods, what joy to Priam and his seed,
How glad will all the Trojans be to see
You two, that all the rest in pow’r exceed,
Hobbes1839: 245With your own hands shed one another’s blood!
I elder am, do then as I advise.
For I conversed have with men as good,
That yet my counsel never did despise.
Perithous and Dryas were great men,
Hobbes1839: 250And Polyphemus and Exadius,
Such as for strength I ne’er shall see again;
And so were Cæneus, and Theseus,
The strongest of mankind were these, and slew
The strongest of wild beasts that haunt the wood.
Hobbes1839: 255These strong men I convers’d withal and knew;
And with them also I did what I could.
With these no other could contend in fight.
Yet they from Pyle thought fit to call me forth
Far off; nor ever did my counsel slight.
Hobbes1839: 260Think not therefore my counsel nothing worth.
Atrides take not from him, though you can,
The damsel which the Greeks have given him.
Forbear the king, Pelides. For the man
Whom Jove hath crown’d is made of Jove a limb.
Hobbes1839: 265Though you be strong, and on a Goddess got,
Atrides is before you in command.
Atrides, be but you to peace once brought,
T’ appease Achilles I will take in hand,
Who is (while we are lying here) our wall.
Hobbes1839: 270To this Atrides answered again,
I nothing can deny of this at all.
But he amongst us thinks he ought to reign,
And give the law to all as he thinks fit.
But I am certain that shall never be.
Hobbes1839: 275He well can fight; the Gods have granted it,
But they ne’er taught him words of infamy.
Then interrupting him, Achilles said,
I were a wretch and nothing worth indeed,
If I whatever you command obey’d.
Hobbes1839: 280I will no more to what you say take heed.
But this I tell you, if you take away
The damsel which is mine by your own gift,
I do not mean for that to make a fray
Amongst the Greeks, or once my hand to lift.
Hobbes1839: 285Fetch her yourself, Atrides, but take heed
Against my will you nothing else take there.
[7]
Try; that th’ Achæans may see how you speed,
And how your black blood shall run down my spear.
Thus in disorder the assembly ends.
Hobbes1839: 290Achilles to his own ships took his way,
Patroclus with him and his other friends.
And Agamemnon then without delay
Launched a bark, and in go row’rs twice ten.
Aboard the maid and th’ hecatomb they lay.
Hobbes1839: 295Ulysses went commander of the men.
And swiftly then the ship cuts out her way.
And then Atrides th’ army purifi’d,
And threw into the sea the purgament.
Then sacrific’d o’ th’ sands by the sea side
Hobbes1839: 300A hecatomb. To heaven up went the scent,
And busy were the people. But the king
Still on his quarrel with Achilles thought,
And how Briseis from his tent to bring.
For what he threaten’d he had not forgot.
Hobbes1839: 305But sent Talthybius and Eurybates
T’ Achilles’ tent to fetch Briseis thence.
(Two public servants of the king were these,
Ordained to carry his commandments.)
If he refuse, said he, to let her go,
Hobbes1839: 310I’ll thither go myself with greater force
And take her thence, whether he will or no.
Which, angry as he is, will vex him worse.
The messengers, though not well pleased, went
Unto the fleet o’ th’ Myrmidons, and there
Hobbes1839: 315They found Achilles sitting by his tent.
Well pleas’d he was not. And they silent were,
And stood still, struck with fear and reverence.
Achilles seeing that, spake first, and said,
Come near. To me you have done no offence.
Hobbes1839: 320Go you, Patroclus, and lead forth the maid,
And give her to these men, that they may be
To Gods and men, and to th’ unbridled man,
My witnesses, when they have need of me
To save th’ Achæans, which he never can.
Hobbes1839: 325For what can he devise of any worth?
Or how can he the Greeks in battle save?
This said, Patroclus led Briseis forth,
And to Atrides’ messengers her gave.
She with them went, though much against her heart.
Hobbes1839: 330Achilles from his friends went off and pray’d.
And sitting with his face to the sea apart
Weeping, unto his mother Thetis said,
Mother, though Jove have given me so small
A time of life, I could contented be,
Hobbes1839: 335Had I not been dishonoured withal,
And forc’d to bear such open injury.
[8]
Thetis in the inmost closets of the deep,
Sat with the old God Nereus, and heard.
And not enduring long to hear him weep,
Hobbes1839: 340Above the sea like to a mist appear’d,
And by him sat, and strok’d his head, and said,
Why weep you, child? What is’t that grieves you so?
Tell me, speak out. Of what are you afraid?
Come, whatsoever ’tis let me it know.
Hobbes1839: 345Mother, said he, ’tis not to you unknown,
When we took Thebe, and had brought away
The captives and the riches of the town,
Chryseis fell t’ Atrides for his prey.
And how her father Chryses came to th’ fleet
Hobbes1839: 350With ransom great his daughter to redeem,
And having in his hands the ensigns meet
Which did his priestly dignity beseem,
A golden sceptre and a crown of bays,
Unto the princes all made his request.
Hobbes1839: 355But to the two Atrides chiefly prays,
Who of the Argive army were the best.
O sons of Atreus, may the Gods grant you
A safe return from Troy with victory;
And you on me compassion may shew,
Hobbes1839: 360Receive these gifts, and set my daughter free;
And have respect to Jove’s and Leto’s son.
To this the princes all gave their consent,
Except King Agamemnon. He alone,
And with sharp language from the fleet him sent.
Hobbes1839: 365Away the old man goes, and as he went,
Against the Greeks he to Apollo pray’d;
Who heard him, and the plague amongst them sent,
Which daily multitudes of them destroy’d.
Of which the prophet, being ask’d the cause,
Hobbes1839: 370Said, ’twas for th’ injury to Chryses done.
I mov’d to send her back. Then angry was
Atrides, though beside Atrides, none.
And though he too has sent her now away,
Yet what he threaten’d he has brought to pass.
Hobbes1839: 375His officers from me have forc’d my prey,
And Agamemnon now Briseis has.
And now, if ever, let me have your aid,
If you have holpen Jove with word or deed;
(For in my father’s house you oft have said,
Hobbes1839: 380That heretofore you stood him in great stead,
When other Gods to bind him had decreed,
Juno and Neptune, Pallas and the rest,
You to him came and from his bonds him freed.
For up you fetch’d Briareus, the best
Hobbes1839: 385Of Titans all, whom men Ægæon call,
The gods Briareus, with a hundred hands,
[9]
And set him next to Jove. No God at all
Then durst to Jupiter approach with bonds);
Put Jove in mind of this, and him intreat
Hobbes1839: 390The Trojan hands to fortify in fight,
And to repel the Greeks with slaughter great,
That in their goodly king they may delight,
And Agamemnon count what he hath won
By doing such dishonour to the best
Hobbes1839: 395Of th’ Argives, and that has such service done.
Ay me, said Thetis, would you could here rest
Unhurt, ungriev’d. For I have born you to
Short life. And not far from you is your fate.
And grievous ’tis to be dishonour’d too.
Hobbes1839: 400But I to Jove will all you say relate
When I go to Olympus. Till then stay,
And angry though you are, from war forbear.
To blackmoor-land the Gods went yesterday,
And twelve days hence again they will be there.
Hobbes1839: 405This said, the Goddess went away, and left
Her son Achilles with his anger striving,
For that he had been of his prize bereft.
And then Ulysses at the port arriving
Of Chryse, first his sails he furl’d, and stow’d
Hobbes1839: 410Them on the deck together with the mast;
And with their oars their ship ashore they row’d,
And out their anchors threw; and ty’d her fast.
And on the beach the men descending laid
The victims in good order on the sand.
Hobbes1839: 415When this was done, they disembark’d the maid.
And then Ulysses took her by the hand,
And brought her to the altar, where the priest
Her father stood, and to him spake, and said,
O Chryses, see, Atrides hath dismiss’d
Hobbes1839: 420Your daughter, and this hecatomb hath paid.
By Agamemnon we are hither sent
The same to offer, and t’ Apollo pray,
That he accept it will, and be content
The sickness from the Greeks to take away.
Hobbes1839: 425This said, he put Chryseis to his hand,
And he with great contentment her receiv’d.
Then all with salt and barley ready stand,
And Chryses pray’d with hands to heaven upheav’d.
Hear me, Apollo, with the silver bow,
Hobbes1839: 430That dost in Tenedos and Cylla reign,
And heardst my pray’r against the Greeks; hear now,
And from them send the pestilence again.
When Chryses had thus to Apollo pray’d,
Then pray’d they all; and salt and barley threw
Hobbes1839: 435Upon the victims; which they kill’d and flay’d.
But from the altar first they them withdrew.
[10]
And then the thighs cut off they alit in twain,
And round about they cover them with fat,
And one part on the other laid again.
Hobbes1839: 440The priest himself came when they had done that,
And burnt them on a fire of cloven wood;
And as they burning were pour’d on black wine.
Young men with spits five-branched by them stood.
When burnt the thighs were for the pow’r divine,
Hobbes1839: 445And entrails eaten, the rest cut in joints
Before the fire they roasted skilfully,
Pierced through with the spits that had five points;
And took it up when roasted thoroughly.
When ended was their work, began the feast;
Hobbes1839: 450Where nothing wanting was of what was good.
And having thirst and hunger dispossest,
And filled with sweet wine the temp’rers stood.
Then round the cups were borne; and all day long
Sitting they celebrated Phœbus’ might,
Hobbes1839: 455And magnifi’d his goodness in sweet song,
And he in his own praises took delight.
But when the sun had borne away his light,
Upon the sands they laid them down to sleep.
And when again Aurora came in sight,
Hobbes1839: 460Again they launch their ship into the deep.
A good fore-wind Apollo with them sent.
Then with her breast the ship the water tore
(Which by her down on both sides roaring went)
And soon arrived at the Trojan shore.
Hobbes1839: 465And there they drew her up again to land,
And ev’ry man went which way he thought best.
Achilles yet not able to command
The anger that still boiled in his breast,
No longer would the Greeks at council meet,
Hobbes1839: 470Nor with them any more to battle come;
But sullen sat before his tent and fleet,
Wishing to see the Argives beaten home.
Twelve times the sun had risen now and set,
The Gods t’ Olympus all returned were;
Hobbes1839: 475Thetis her son’s complaints did not forget,
But up she carried them to Jupiter.
Upon the highest top alone sat he
Of the great many-headed hill, and laid
One hand on’s breast, th’ other on his knee.
Hobbes1839: 480And in that posture thus unto him said,
O father Jove, if for you I have done
Service at any time by word or deed,
Repay it now I pray you to my son,
Whom Agamemnon hath dishonoured.
Hobbes1839: 485Short time the Fates have given him to life.
Atrides taken from him hath his prey.
[11]
Now victory unto the Trojans give
Till Agamemnon for his fault shall pay.
Thus prayed she. But Jove made no reply.
Hobbes1839: 490Nor took she off her hands; but pray’d anew;
O Jove, my prayer grant me, or deny,
That I may know what power I have in you.
Then Jove much grieved, spake to her, and said,
’Twixt me and Juno ’twill a quarrel make.
Hobbes1839: 495For she before the Gods will me upbraid,
When she shall know the Trojans’ part I take.
But go, lest she observe what you do here.
I’ll give a nod to all that you have spoken,
That you may safely trust to and not fear.
Hobbes1839: 500A nod from me is an unfailing token.
This said, with his black brows he to her nodded,
Wherewith displayed were his locks divine;
Olympus shook at stirring of his Godhead;
And Thetis from it jump’d into the brine,
Hobbes1839: 505And Jupiter unto his house went down.
The Gods arose and waited on him thither:
But unto Juno it was not unknown
That he and Thetis had conferr’d together,
Who presently to Jove her husband went,
Hobbes1839: 510And angry him rebuk’d with language keen.
You that still in my absence tricks invent,
What God hath with you now in counsel been?
Though unto me you hate to tell your mind.
Juno, said Jove, you must not hope to hear
Hobbes1839: 515All whatsoe’er it be, I have design’d.
But what I mean shall come unto the ear
Of all the Gods, you first of all shall know.
But what from all together I shall hide
Ask me no more, I will not tell you, though
Hobbes1839: 520My wife you be. Juno then thus repli’d.
Harsh Chronides, what words of yours are these!
To ask you questions I’ll henceforth forbear,
And quietly let you do what you please.
But one thing I must tell you that I fear.
Hobbes1839: 525Thetis, I fear, has gotten your consent,
For her son’s sake the Argives to oppress.
Suspect you can, said Jove, but not prevent,
Which doth but give me cause to love you less.
Though it be true, ’twas I would have it so.
Hobbes1839: 530Therefore sit still and do as I would have you.
Lest when my mighty hands about you go,
Nor all the other Gods in heav’n shall save you.
Then Juno silent sat with grief and fear;
And all the Gods i’ th’ house of Jove did grieve.
Hobbes1839: 535But Vulcan, the renoun’d artificer,
Stood up his mother Juno to relieve.
[12]
O what will this come to at last, said he,
If you for mortals thus shall be at odds!
The tumult than the cheer will greater be.
Hobbes1839: 540What pleasure can this be unto the Gods?
And though my mother wiser be than I,
Yet thus much I’ll not doubt her to advise,
That with my father’s will she would comply,
That no such quarrel may hereafter rise.
Hobbes1839: 545For by the roots he can the world pluck up.
Therefore I pray you mother speak him fair;
He’ll soon be pleas’d. Then filled he a cup
Of nectar sweet, and bore it to her chair;
And to her said, mother, I pray you hold,
Hobbes1839: 550And do no more my father’s choler move.
If you be beaten I shall but behold,
And grieve I am not strong enough for Jove.
I would have helpt you once, when by the foot
He threw me down to Lemnos from the sky.
Hobbes1839: 555All the day long I was a falling to’t,
Where more than half dead taken up was I.
And there by th’ Sincians I was taken up.
When Vulcan had his history told out,
His mother on him smil’d, and took the cup,
Hobbes1839: 560And to the Gods he nectar bore about.
And then the Gods laught all at once outright
To see the lame and sooty Vulcan skink.
And all the day from morning unto night
Ambrosia they eat, and nectar drink.
Hobbes1839: 565Apollo played, and alternately
The Muses to him sung. When night was come,
Then gently Sleep solicited each eye,
And to his house each God departed home.
And Jupiter went up unto the bed
Hobbes1839: 570Where he at other times was wont to lie
When sleep came on him, and laid down his head
To take repose; and Juno lay him by.
[13]

LIB. II.
[edit]


The dream of Agamemnon. The tempting of the army, and the catalogue of ships and commanders.
The Gods, and princes of the Argive host
Slept all night long. Jove only waking lay,
And many projects in his mind he tost,
To grace Achilles, and the Greeks annoy.
Hobbes1839: 5At last a Dream he call’d. False Dream, said he,
Go, hie to Agamemnon’s tent, and say,
Distinctly as you bidden are by me.
Bid him bring up his army now to Troy;
For now the time is come he shall it take.
Hobbes1839: 10The Gods no more thereon deliberate,
But all consented have for Juno’s sake,
No longer to delay the Trojan fate.
Then with his errand went the Dream away,
And quickly was at Agamemnon’s tent.
Hobbes1839: 15And finding him as fast asleep he lay,
Up presently unto his head he went.
And in the shape of Nestor to him spake.
Sleep you, said he, Atrides? ’Tis not fit
For him from whom the people counsel take,
Hobbes1839: 20That sleep all night upon his eyes should sit.
But Jove looks to you. Listen then to me.
For ’tis from Jove that I am to you come.
He bids you lead the army presently
Up every man to the walls of Ilium.
Hobbes1839: 25For now the time is come you shall it take.
The Gods no more thereon deliberate.
But all consented have for Juno’s sake,
No longer to delay the Trojan fate.
And therefore when you wake forget it not.
Hobbes1839: 30This said, the Dream departed. And the king
Believ’d it as an oracle, and thought
To take Troy now as sure as anything;
Vain man, presuming from a dream Jove’s will,
Who meant to th’ Greeks and Trojans yet much woe,
Hobbes1839: 35And with their carcasses the field to fill
Before the Greeks should back to Argos go.
The king awak’d, and sat upon his bed,
Puts on his coat and a great cloak upon,
Handsome and new; his dream still in his head;
[14]
The dream of Agamemnon, &c.
Hobbes1839: 40And then his silver-studded sword puts on.
And then he took his sceptre in his hand
Which formerly his ancestors had borne,
And went to th’ ships whereof he had command.
And to the Gods with light then came the morn.
Hobbes1839: 45Then Agamemnon bids to counsel call.
The cryers call’d, the Greeks together went.
But first he had with the old captains all
Consulted what to do at Nestor’s tent;
And said he dream’d that one like Nestor spake
Hobbes1839: 50To him and said, Atrides ’tis not fit
For one of whom the people counsel take
That sleep upon his eyes all night should sit.
But Jove secures you. Listen then to me,
For ’tis from him that I unto you come.
Hobbes1839: 55He bids you lead the army presently
Up every man to the walls of Ilium.
For now the time is come you shall it take,
The Gods thereon no more deliberate,
But all consented have for Juno’s sake,
Hobbes1839: 60No longer to delay the Trojan fate.
And therefore when you wake forget it not.
This said, the dream went off again, and I
How to th’ assault the army may be brought
As far as we can safely fain would try.
Hobbes1839: 65I’ll first give them advice to go away,
As if there were no hope to gain the town.
But you must then be sure to make them stay.
This said, King Agamemnon sat him down,
And Nestor rose. Captains of th’ host, said he,
Hobbes1839: 70This dream, had it been told b’another man,
Feigned and foolish would have seem’d to me.
But since the king is th’ author (if we can)
Let us persuade the people to take arms.
And having said, began to lead away.
Hobbes1839: 75And now the people coming there in swarms.
For as the bees in a fair summer’s day
Come out in clusters from the hollow rock,
And light upon the flow’rs that honey yield;
So to th’ assembly did the people flock,
Hobbes1839: 80And bristling stood with expectation fill’d.
When they sat down, it made the ground to sigh.
The lords nine criers then amongst them sent
To make them silent, or to drown their cry,
And from the press their chairs to defend.
Hobbes1839: 85With much ado at last they silent were.
Then Agamemnon took into his hand
His sceptre (which was made by Mulciber
For Jove to carry when he did command.
Jove gave it afterward to Mercury;
[15]
The tempting of the army.
Hobbes1839: 90And Mercury to Pelops gave the same.
From Pelops it went down successively
To Atreus, and to Thyestes came.
From him it came to Agamemnon’s hand,
Who many islands and all Argos sway’d.)
Hobbes1839: 95And leaning now upon it with his hand,
Unto the princes of the army said.
Servants of Mars, commanders of the Greeks,
O what great trouble Jove involves me in!
Disgracefully to send me home he seeks,
Hobbes1839: 100Although he told me I the town should win,
And now (when I have lost so many men)
It seems to play with men he takes delight.
What towns has he destroy’d, and will again
Destroy still more, to exercise his might?
Hobbes1839: 105For both to us and our posterity
’Twill be a great disgrace to go to Troy
With so great multitudes, and baffled be,
And nothing done again to come away.
If we and they should on a truce agree,
Hobbes1839: 110And one by one they muster up their men;
And we should count how many tens we be,
And make one Trojan fill out wine for ten,
Many a ten would want a man to skink,
So much in number we the town exceed.
Hobbes1839: 115But when upon their many aids I think,
I wonder less that we no better speed.
Nine years are gone; our cordage spoiled with rain:
Our ships are rotted, and our wives at home,
And children dear expect us back again.
Hobbes1839: 120Nor know we of the war what will become.
Come, then, and all agree on what I say,
Let’s put to sea, and back t’ Achæa fly.
We shall not win the town although we stay.
This said, the army with applauses high
Hobbes1839: 125Consented all (save those that had been by
In council of the princes of Achæa)
And moved were like to the billows high
That rolled are by some great wind at sea.
Or as, when in a field of well-grown wheat
Hobbes1839: 130The ears incline by a sharp wind opprest;
So bow’d the heads in this assembly great
When their consent they to the king exprest.
Then going to the ships cry’d Ha la la!
Great dust they raised, and encouraged
Hobbes1839: 135Each other to the sea his ship to draw,
And cleans’d the way to th’ water from each bed;
And straight unpropt their ships; and to the sky
Went up the noise. Then Juno sent away
Pallas. Pallas, quoth she, the Greeks will fly,
[16]
Hobbes1839: 140And Helen leave behind, for whom at Troy
So many of the Greeks their lives have lost,
And stay’d so long in vain before the town.
And then will Priam and the Trojans boast,
Unless you quickly to the ships go down.
Hobbes1839: 145Go quickly then, try if you can prevail,
With hopeful words to stay them yet ashore,
And take away their sudden list to sail,
And let the ships lie as they did before.
This said, the Goddess leapt down to the ground,
Hobbes1839: 150From high Olympus, and stood on the sand
Where lay the Greeks. Ulysses there she found
Angry to see the people go from land.
Ulysses, said she, do you mean to fly,
And here leave Helen after so much cost
Hobbes1839: 155Of time and blood, and show your vanity;
And leave the Trojans of their rape to boast?
Speak to each one, try if you can prevail
With hopeful words to stay them on the shore,
And take away this sudden list to sail,
Hobbes1839: 160And let the ships lie where they lay before.
Ulysses then ran t’ Agamemnon’s tent,
And took his staff (the mark of chief command)
And laying by his cloak to th’ ships he went,
Amongst th’ Achæans with that staff in’s hand.
Hobbes1839: 165And when he met with any prince or peer,
He gently said, fear does not you become.
You should not only you yourself stay here,
But also others keep from flying home.
Atrides now did but the Argives try,
Hobbes1839: 170And those he sees most forward to be gone
Shall find perhaps least favour in his eye.
For of the secret council you were none.
Deep-rooted is the anger of a king,
To whom high Jove committed has the law,
Hobbes1839: 175And justice left to his distributing.
But when a common man he bawling saw,
He bang’d him with his staff, and roughly spake.
Be silent, and hear what your betters say.
For who of you doth any notice take
Hobbes1839: 180In council or in martial array?
Let one be king (we cannot all be kings)
To whom Jove gave the sceptre and the laws
To rule for him. Thus he the people brings
Off from their purpose, and to council draws.
Hobbes1839: 185Then to th’ assembly back again they pass’d,
With noise like that the sea makes when it breaks
Against the shore, and quiet were at last.
Thersites only standeth up and speaks.
One that to little purpose could say much.
[17]
Hobbes1839: 190And what he thought would make men laugh would say.
And for an ugly fellow none was such
’Mongst all the Argives that besieged Troy.
Lame of one leg he was; and look’d asquint;
His shoulders at his breast together came;
Hobbes1839: 195His head went tapering up into a point,
With straggling and short hair upon the same.
Ulysses and Achilles most him hated,
For these two princes he us’d most to chide;
And Agamemnon now aloud he rated,
Hobbes1839: 200And thereby anger’d all the Greeks beside.
What is’t, Atrides, said he, stays you here?
Your tent is full of brass; women you have
The best of all that by us taken were,
For always unto you the choice we gave.
Hobbes1839: 205Or look you for more gold that yet may come
For ransom of some prisoner whom I
Or other Greeks shall take at Ilium,
Or for some young maid to keep privately?
But kings ought not their private ease to buy
Hobbes1839: 210With public danger and a common woe.
Come, women of Achaia, let us fly,
And let him spend his gettings on the foe.
For then how much we help him he will know,
That has a better than himself disgrac’d.
Hobbes1839: 215But that Achilles is to anger slow,
That injury of his had been his last.
This said, Ulysses straightway to him went,
And with sour look, and bitter language said,
Prater, that to thyself seems eloquent,
Hobbes1839: 220How darest thou alone the king t’ upbraid?
A greater coward than thou art there’s none
’Mongst all the Greeks that came with us to Troy.
Else ’gainst the king thy tongue would not so run.
Thou seek’st but an excuse to run away.
Hobbes1839: 225Because we know not how we shall come off
As yet from Troy, must you the king upbraid,
And at the princes of the army scoff,
As if they too much honour to him paid?
But I will tell you one thing, and will do’t.
Hobbes1839: 230If here again I find you fooling thus,
Then from my shoulders let my head be cut,
Or let me lose my son Telemachus,
If I not strip you naked to the skin,
And send you soundly beaten to the ships
Hobbes1839: 235With many stripes and ugly to be seen.
This said, he basted him both back and hips.
Thersites shrugg’d, and wept, sat down, and had
His shoulders black and blue, dy’d by the staff;
Look’d scurvily. The people that were sad
[18]
Hobbes1839: 240But just before, now could not choose but laugh.
And, oh, said one t’ another standing near,
Ulysses many handsome things has done,
When we in council or in battle were,
A better deed than this is he did none,
Hobbes1839: 245That has so silenced this railing knave,
And of his peevish humour stay’d the flood,
As he no more will dare the king to brave.
And then to speak Ulysses ready stood.
Where Pallas like a crier did appear,
Hobbes1839: 250And standing by him silence did command,
That also they that sat far off might hear.
Then spake he, with the sceptre in his hand.
The people, O Atrides, go about
To put you on an act will be your shame,
Hobbes1839: 255Forgetting what they promis’d setting out,
Not to return till Troy they overcame.
But now like widow-women they complain,
Or little children longing to go home.
To be from home a month, it is a pain
Hobbes1839: 260To them that to their loving wives would come.
To sea they’d go though certain to be tost
By many a sturdy wind upon the same.
But they have now lain here nine years almost;
I cannot therefore say they are to blame.
Hobbes1839: 265But certainly after so long a stay
’Tis very shameful empty back to go.
Let us at least abide till know we may
Whether what Chalchas said be true or no.
For this we all know and are witnesses
Hobbes1839: 270(Excepting only those that since are dead)
When we from Aulis went to pass the seas,
And by contrary winds were hindered,
That there we to the gods did sacrifice
Upon an altar close unto a spring,
Hobbes1839: 275That of a plane-tree at the root did rise;
And how we saw there a prodigious thing.
A mighty serpent with a back blood-red
From out the spring glided up to the tree,
The boughs whereof were ev’ry way far spread.
Hobbes1839: 280On th’ utmost chanc’d a sparrow’s nest to be.
Young ones were in it eight, with th’ old one nine;
The old one near the nest stay’d fluttering,
And grievously the while did cry and whine.
At last the serpent catcht her by the wing.
Hobbes1839: 285And when the serpent had devour’d all nine,
He presently was turn’d into a stone;
That we might see from Jove it was a sign
Of what should afterward at Troy be done.
We were amaz’d so strange a thing to see,
[19]
Hobbes1839: 290Till Chalchas rose and did the same explain.
This is a certain sign from Jove, said he,
That he intends to do the like again.
For as the snake devour’d nine birds in all;
So nine years long we shall make war at Troy,
Hobbes1839: 295And after nine years Ilium shall fall.
But in the tenth year we shall come away.
This then said Chalchas; and all hitherto
Is come to pass. Therefore Achæans stay,
Since nothing here remaineth now to do,
Hobbes1839: 300But overcoming the old town of Troy.
This said, the people made a mighty noise,
Which bounding from the ships was twice as great,
Sounding of nothing but Ulysses’ praise.
And up then rose old Nestor from his seat.
Hobbes1839: 305Fie, fie, said he, why sit we talking here?
Where are your promises, and whither gone
Our oaths and vows? To what end did we swear?
Where be the hands that we rely’d upon?
What good will’t do to sit upon the shore,
Hobbes1839: 310How long soever be our time to stay?
Hold fast, Atrides, as you did before
The power you have; and lead us up to Troy.
A man or two you safely may neglect,
Though they dissent and secret counsel take.
Hobbes1839: 315For they’ll be able nothing to effect,
Before to Argos our retreat we make,
And know if Jove have spoken true or no.
For when we went aboard to go for Troy,
Jove light’ned to the right hand, which all know
Hobbes1839: 320A sign of granting is for what we pray.
Let none of you long therefore to be gone,
Till of some Trojan’s wife he hath his will,
And ta’en a not unfit revenge upon
The Trojans that have Helen us’d as ill.
Hobbes1839: 325But he that for all this is fiercely bent
On going home, and thinks that counsel best,
And lays hand on his ship, let him be sent
Down into Erebus before the rest.
But you, O king, think well, and take advice
Hobbes1839: 330First into tribes the army to divide,
And tribes again into fraternities,
That tribe may tribe and fellow fellow aid.
The leaders and the soldiers then you’ll know
Which of them merits praise, and which is naught.
Hobbes1839: 335And if the town you do not overthrow,
Whether on us or Jove to lay the fault.
To this Atrides answer made and said,
O Nestor, father, you exceed all men
In giving counsel. Would the Gods me aid
[20]
Hobbes1839: 340With counsellors such as you are but ten,
The town of Priam we should quickly win.
Nor had we now so long about it staid,
If Jupiter had not engag’d me in
A quarrel with Achilles for a maid.
Hobbes1839: 245But if we come but once more to agree,
The evil day from Troy will not be far.
Now take your food, that we may ready be,
And able to endure the toil of war.
Let ev’ry man now sharpen well his spear,
Hobbes1839: 350His buckler mend, and give his horses meat,
And look well to his chariot everywhere,
That we may fight all day without retreat,
For we shall fight I doubt not all day long,
And never cease as long as we can see.
Hobbes1839: 355Of many a shield sweaty will be the thong,
And spear upon the hand lie heavily;
And many horses at the chariot sweat.
But he that willingly to avoid the fight
Shall stay behind, or to the ships retreat,
Hobbes1839: 360His body shall be food for dog and kite.
This said, the people pleas’d with what was spoken,
Approv’d the same with shouts, as loud as when
Betwixt great waves and rocks the sea is broken.
Then from the assembly they return again.
Hobbes1839: 365And at their ships they sacrifice and pray
Each one to th’ God in whom he trusted most,
That he might by his favour come away
Alive, with whole limbs from the Trojan host.
But Agamemnon sacrific’d a steer
Hobbes1839: 370To Jove, of five years old, and to the feast
Call’d such as in the army princes were,
Or held to be for chivalry the best,
Nestor, Idomeneus, two Ajaces,
And the son of Tydeus Diomed,
Hobbes1839: 375The sixth Ulysses Laertiades,
And Menelaus thither came unbid.
For well he knew his brother would be sad.
About the victim then th’ assembly stands,
And in their hands they salt and barley had.
Hobbes1839: 380Then pray’d Atrides holding up his hands;
Great, glorious Jove, that dwellest in the sky,
O let not Phœbus carry hence the day
Till Priam’s palace proud in ashes lie,
And Hector sprawling in the dust of Troy,
Hobbes1839: 385And many Trojans with him. So pray’d he.
And Jove was with his sacrifice content.
But unto all his pray’r did not agree,
Intending still his labour to augment.
Whan all had pray’d, they salt and barley threw
[21]
Hobbes1839: 390Upon the victim which they kill’d and flay’d.
But from the altar they it first withdrew.
The thighs they slit, and fat upon them laid.
And burnt them in a fire of cloven wood;
The entrails o’er the fire they broiled eat,
Hobbes1839: 395The rest they roast on spits that by them stood;
And when they roasted were, fell to their meat.
When the desire of meat and drink was gone,
Nestor stood up, and to Atrides said,
Let us no longer leave the work undone,
Hobbes1839: 400Which Jupiter himself has on us laid.
Let’s call the Greeks together out of hand,
That we may make them ready for the war.
Atrides then to th’ criers gave command
T’ assemble them. They soon assembled are.
Hobbes1839: 405And then the princes went into the field,
And them in tribes and in fraternities
Distinguished. And Pallas with her shield,
(An undecaying shield and of great price,
Rais’d at the brim with orbs of beaten gold
Hobbes1839: 410An hundred, worth an hundred cows at least.)
With this the Goddess went, to make them bold,
Courage inspiring into ev’ry breast.
And now their hearts are all on fire to fight,
And vanish’d is the thought of their returning.
Hobbes1839: 415And such as of a mountain is the sight
Upon whose top a large thick wood stands burning;
Such, as they marching were, the splendour was,
And seemed to reach up unto the sky,
Reflected from so many arms of brass
Hobbes1839: 420Bright and new polished unto the eye.
As when of many sorts the long-neck’d fowls
Unto the large and flow’ry plain repair,
Through which Cayster’s water gently rolls,
In multitudes high flying in the air,
Hobbes1839: 425Then here and there fly priding in their wing,
And by and by at once light on the ground,
And with great clamour make the air to ring,
And th’ earth whereon they settle to resound;
So when th’ Acheans went up from the fleet,
Hobbes1839: 430And on their march were to the town of Troy,
The earth resounded loud with hoofs and feet.
But at Scamander’s flow’ry bank they stay,
In number like the flowers of the field,
Or leaves in spring, or multitude of flies
Hobbes1839: 435In some great dairy ’bout the vessels fill’d,
Delighted with the milk, dance, fall and rise.
The leaders then amongst them went, and brought
Them quickly into tribes and companies,
As ev’ry goat-herd quickly knows his goat
[22]
Hobbes1839: 440Whether it be another man’s or his.
And Agamemnon there amongst the rest
Was eminent. Like Jove in hea and face;
Belted like Mars; like Neptune’s was his breast.
Such beauty Jove upon the man did place.
The catalogue of ships and commanders.
Hobbes1839: 445Now, Muses, ye that in Olympus dwell,
(For Goddesses you are, and present were,
And all that pass’d at Troy can truly tell,
And we can nothing know but what we hear.)
Who of the Greeks at Troy commanded men?
Hobbes1839: 450The common soldiers you need not name,
For I should never say them o’er again,
Although I had as many tongues as Fame.
Boetia, wherein contained be
Eteonus, and Schœnus, and Scolus,
Hobbes1839: 455Aulis, Thespeia, Græa, Hyrie,
Harma, Eilesius, and Mycalessus,
Erythræ, Elion, Ocaliæ.
Hylæ, Eutresis, Thisbe, Peleon,
Platæa, Aliareus, and Copæ,
Hobbes1839: 460Coronia, Glisse, Thebe, Medeon,
Onchestus Neptune’s town, Nissa divine,
And Midias, and utmost Anthedon,
And Arne that great plenty has of wine.
The which in all made fifty ships. And those
Hobbes1839: 465Commanded were by Archesilaus,
And Prothoenor and Peneleos,
And Leitus, and with them Clonius.
The seamen in each one to six score rose.
Aspledon and Orchomenus besides
Hobbes1839: 470Did set forth twenty good black ships to sea.
Ascalaphus and Ialmenus were guides,
Begot by Mars upon Astyoche.
The towns of Phocis, Crissa, Panopea,
And Cyparissus, Python, and Daulis,
Hobbes1839: 475And on the brook of Cephisus Lilæa,
And Anemoria, and Hyampolis,
And other towns o’ th’ bank of Cephisus,
Made ready forty good ships for the seas,
Ruled by Schedius and Epistraphus
Hobbes1839: 480The sons of Iphitus Naubolides.
The Locrians the lesser Ajax led,
Of King Oileus the valiant son.
(For he was lower more than by the head
Than t’ other Ajax, son of Telamon)
Hobbes1839: 485A linen armour he wore on his breast.
But understood as well to use a spear,
Or better, than could any of the rest
That in the army of th’ Achæans were.
There went with him from Cynus and Opus,
[23]
Hobbes1839: 490From Bessa, Scarphe, Thronius, Aygiæ,
Tarphe, Calliarus, Boagrius,
Forty good ships well fitted for the sea.
Th’ Eubœans were by Elephenor led,
That dwell in Chalcis and Eretriæ,
Hobbes1839: 495Cerinthus, Dion (that holds high her head),
Carystus, Styra, and in Istiæa.
And by the name Abantes they all go,
Good men, and that in battle use the spear,
And love to pierce the armour of a foe.
Hobbes1839: 500And these on forty ships embarked were.
From Athens (who Erectheus’ people were,
Aurora’s son, by Pallas nourished
In her own temple, in which ev’ry year
Many good bulls and lambs are offered),
Hobbes1839: 505Under Menesteus fifty ships did pass,
Who for the ord’ring of a battle well
Of horse or foot the best of all men was,
Save Nestor, who in age did him excel.
From Salamis came to the Trojan shore,
Hobbes1839: 510And by the greater Ajax govern’d were,
The son of Telamon, twelve good ships more,
And lay at anchor to th’ Athenians near.
Argos, Tyrinthe, Trœzen, Asine,
And Epidaurus, and Hermione,
Hobbes1839: 515Mases and Ægina, and Eione,
Amongst them all put four score ships to sea.
Of which there were three captains, Diomed,
Euryalus, and Sthenelus. But they
By Diomed were chiefly governed.
Hobbes1839: 520For him they all commanded were t’ obey.
And from Mycenæ, Corinth, Cleonæ,
And Orthe, and Hyperesiæ,
From Sicyon, and Aræthuree,
And Gonoessa, and from Helice,
Hobbes1839: 525Pellenæ, Ægium, and all that shore,
An hundred ships were laid upon the sea;
And with King Agamemnon passed o’er,
And his peculiar command were these.
Amongst them he puts on his armour then,
Hobbes1839: 530Proud that he was of all the heroes best.
For of his own he thither brought most men,
And chief commander was of all the rest.
From Sparta, Pharæ, Messa, Brysiæ,
From about Otylus, with those from Laus,
Hobbes1839: 535Helos, Amyclæ, and from Aygiæ,
Went thirty good black ships with Menelaus.
Which from his brother’s forces stood apart,
And he amongst them heart’ning them to fight,
And breathing courage into every heart.
[24]
Hobbes1839: 540For to the Trojans he bare greatest spite.
Pylus, Arene, Cyparisseis,
Amphigenia, Æpy, and Thryus,
(Whereat a ford i’ th’ stream Alpheus is)
Elos, and Pteleus, and Dorius.
Hobbes1839: 545(Here ’twas the Muses met with Toamyris
The Thracian fiddler, which their art did slight,
And said their skill was not so good as his,
And they depriv’d him both of art and sight.)
The number of the ships those towns set forth,
Hobbes1839: 550In all amounted to four score and ten;
And led were by a captain of great worth.
’Twas Nestor the command had of these men.
From Phene, Ripe, and Orchomenus,
And from Enispe, and from Stratiæ,
Hobbes1839: 555Tege, Mantinea, Stymphalus,
And those that dwelled in Parrhasia,
(Arcadians all, and in sharp war well skill’d)
Came sixty ships by Agapenor led,
And ev’ry ship sufficiently fill’d.
Hobbes1839: 560But then the ships Atrides furnished.
The men of Helis, and Buprasium,
And all the ground enclos’d by Hyrmine,
Myrsinus, Olene, Alisium,
Amongst them all put forty ships to sea,
Hobbes1839: 565Led by Amphimachus and Thalpius,
Diores, and Polyxenus, the son
Of martial Agasthenes, and then
Ten good ships were commanded by each one.
Dulichium, and th’ isles Echinades,
Hobbes1839: 570Sent forty ships. Messes commander went
The son of Phyleus, who for his ease
Liv’d from his father there in discontent.
Ulysses also brought out twelve good ships
From Ithaca, Neritus, Ceph’lonia,
Hobbes1839: 575From Same, and from Zant, and Ægylips,
And from Epirus, and Croæylia.
Th’ Ætolians with Thoas Andræmon’s son
Sent from Pylene, and from Chalcis, and
From Olenus, Pleuron, and Calydon
Hobbes1839: 580Sent forty ships, whereof the sole command
In Thoas was. For Œneus was dead,
And Meleager; all the royal race.
Andræmon’s son their men to Troy to lead
By suffrage of the cities chosen was.
Hobbes1839: 585From Crossus, Gortys (in the isle of Crete)
Lictus, Miletus, Phæstus, Rycius,
Lycastus, and some others went a fleet
Of eighty ships with King Idomenus.
And valiant as Mars Meriones.
[25]
Hobbes1839: 590And nine good ships went with Tlepolemus
(That was the son of mighty Hercules)
From Lindus, Camirus, Ialissus.
For Hercules Tlepolemus begat
On Astyochia whom in war he won,
Hobbes1839: 595And for her many cities had laid flat.
But after Hercules was dead and gone,
Tlepolemus, now grown a man and bold,
Licymnius (his father’s uncle) slew
By th’ mother’s side, a branch of Mars, but old.
Hobbes1839: 600Then cuts down trees, and rigs a navy new,
And many men together gathered,
And wandered till to Rhodes he came at last,
And there dwelt in three tribes distributed.
Fear of his kindred made him go in haste.
Hobbes1839: 605And mightily in little time they throve,
And ev’ry day in wealth and power grew,
And favour’d were continually by Jove.
For daily he unto them riches threw.
From Syme went with Nireus ships three,
Hobbes1839: 610Nireus that was the fairest man of all
(Achilles always must excepted be)
But weak was Nireus, and his number small.
From Casus, Carpathus, and Nisyrus,
Calydnæ Islands, and the Isle of Cous
Hobbes1839: 615Went thirty ships. Two sons of Thessalus
The son of Hercules commanded those.
And the Pelasgic Argives sent to sea
From Trechis, and from Hellas, and Halus,
From Pthia, and the port of Alope,
Hobbes1839: 620Commanded by the son of Peleus,
Fifty good ships of Myrmidons, which some
Achæans, others Hellens used to call.
But these would not to any battle come.
For sullen sat ashore their general,
Hobbes1839: 625Because Briseis they had forc’d away,
Which when he won Lyrnessus, was his prize,
And did Epistrophus and Mynes slay.
There sat he then, but shall again arise.
From Inon, Phylace, and Pyrasus,
Hobbes1839: 630From Pteleus, and Antron on the sea
Went forty ships, with Protesilaus,
Which he commanded while alive was he.
But he was dead. For as he leapt to land
From out his ship, he was the first man slain
Hobbes1839: 635Of all th’ Achæans by a Trojan hand,
And left his wife to tear her hair in vain,
His house at Phylace half finished.
His soldiers chose Podarces in his place,
His younger brother, who at Troy them led.
[26]
Hobbes1839: 640A captain good; but th’ elder better was.
And they that dwelt about Boebeis Lake,
Iaolcus, Boebe, Pheræ, Glaphyræ,
Put all together, ships eleven make.
Under Eumelus these were put to sea.
Hobbes1839: 645From rugged Olizon and Melibœa,
The towns Methone and Thomacia sent
Seven ships of fifty oars apiece to sea,
And Philoctetes their commander went.
But him the Achæans left in Lemnos isle,
Hobbes1839: 650In cruel torment bitten by a snake.
And of his ships medon took charge the while.
But better care of him the Greeks will take.
From Tricca then, and from Methone steep,
And from Oechalia (seat of Euritus),
Hobbes1839: 655Thirty good ships to Troy went o’er the sea,
By Machaon led and Podalirius,
Two skilful sons of Æsculapius.
From chalky Titanus Hyperia, and
Astirius, and from Ormenius,
Hobbes1839: 660Eurypilus did forty ships command.
And from the towns Argissa and Gyrtone,
From Oloosson, Orthe on the Hill,
With those that sent were from the town Elone,
So many went as forty ships did fill.
Hobbes1839: 665And had two leaders. Polypœtes one,
Son of Perithous the son of Jove,
And gotten by him was the day whereon
He and the Lapiths ’gainst the Centaurs strove,
And drave them from the mountain Pelion.
Hobbes1839: 670The other leader was Leontius,
Whose father was Capaneus, who the son
Was of the valiant Lapith Cœneus.
The Ænians and Perrhibœans bold
Did two-and-twenty good black ships set out,
Hobbes1839: 675From hollow Cyphus, and Dodona cold,
And other habitations about
The pleasant river Titaretius,
That into Peneus runs, but doth not mix,
But glides like oil at top of Peneus,
Hobbes1839: 680For Titaretius is a branch of Styx.
These Gonneus led. Then the Magnesians sent
From towns upon the banks of Peneus,
And sides of Pelion mountain eminent,
Forty good ships under swift Prothous.
Hobbes1839: 685These were the leaders of the Achæan forces.
O Goddess, tell me now who was the best
In battle of the leaders, and whose horses
In swiftness and in force excell’d the rest.
Eumelus, his two horses did surpass
[27]
Hobbes1839: 690(Though they were females) all the rest for speed;
Their colour, age, and stature equal was,
Sprung in Pieria from Apollo’s breed,
That terror drew about as swift as wind.
’Mongst Greeks the greater Ajax had no peer.
Hobbes1839: 695For now Achilles had the war declin’d,
Whom none in prowess equall’d or came near,
Nor other horses could with his compare.
But at his ships he discontented stay’d,
And full of spite which he th’ Atrides bare,
Hobbes1839: 700Whilst on the beach idle his soldiers play’d
At who could furthest throw a dart or stone.
The horses loosely wander’d here and there
Amongst the people, and had riders none,
Or upon lote and cinquefoil feeding were.
Hobbes1839: 705But the Achæans to Scamander march’d
Swiftly as when a fire runs o’er a plain
Which Phœbus had with a long summer parch’d,
And going made the ground to groan again,
As when Jove angry lasheth Arimy,
Hobbes1839: 710Which men say of Typhæus is the bed,
The earth therewith is made to groan and sigh,
So groan’d the ground when they to Troy were led.
Then Jove unto the Trojans Iris sent,
Who old and young were then at Priam’s gate
Hobbes1839: 715Assembled with the king in parliament.
Over their heads stood Iris as they sate.
Her voice was like to that of Priam’s son
Polytes, that was watching at the tomb
Of old Æsuites, there to wait upon
Hobbes1839: 720The coming of the Greeks to Ilium.
Old man, said she, you love to hear men preach
As in a time of peace. But now ’tis war.
The Greeks no more lie idle on the beach,
But at your gates, and numberless they are,
Hobbes1839: 725As sands by the sea-side, or leaves in spring.
And to the city now they bring the war.
Hector, to you this counsel now I bring.
Within the city many people are
To aid you come of divers languages.
Hobbes1839: 730Let them that hither led them lead them here,
Arm, and command them each one as he please.
When she had done, dismiss’d the people were.
Hector to open all the gates commands,
And with great clamour horse and foot come out.
Hobbes1839: 735Before the city a high pillar stands,
To which the field lies open round about;
And Battiea called was by men;
Which ’mongst the Gods another name did bear,
Myrinna’s sepulchre. And there again
[28]
Hobbes1839: 740The Trojans and their succours muster’d were.
The Trojans were by Hector led. The best
In battle, and in number most were these,
With spear in hand, and brass on back and breast.
The Dardans were commanded by Æneas,
Hobbes1839: 745(Anchises’ son; but Venus was his mother;
Amongst the hills of Ida got he was.)
And joint commanders with him were two other
Brave men, Archilochus and Acamas.
And of Zeleia the inhabitants,
Hobbes1839: 750Which of Mount Ida lieth at the foot,
And on the river of Æsopus stands,
Under command of Pandarus were put,
Son of Lycaon, and that well knew how
To make an arrow in the air fly true.
Hobbes1839: 755Phœbus himself had given him a bow,
And how to use the same none better knew.
Th’ Adrasteians and the men of Apæsus,
Of Pityeia and Tereia hill
Were by Adrastus led and Amphius,
Hobbes1839: 760Two sons of Merops, that had mighty skill
In prophecy, and both of them forbad
Themselves to venture in the war at Troy.
But Fate a greater power with them had,
And made them go, but brought them not away.
Hobbes1839: 765The people of Percosia, and they
That dwell upon the banks of Practius,
Arisbe, Sestus, Abydus, obey
The orders of their leader Asius
The son of Hyrtacus, whose chariot
Hobbes1839: 770By horses great and black as any coal,
And on it he to Ilium was brought;
And of Selleis race each one a foal.
Larissa was Pelasgic by descent.
Under Pylæus and Hyppothous,
Hobbes1839: 775Two stout Pelasgic leaders these were sent,
Who both the grandsons were of Teutomus.
The Thracians on this side Hellespont,
Were led by Pirus and by Achamas.
O’ th’ Cycon who do these oppose in front
Hobbes1839: 780Trœzenus’ son Euphemus leader was.
From Amydon that standeth on the side
Of Axius, the fairest stream that flows,
The Pœons came. Pyrechmus them did guide,
And arm’d they were with arrows and with bows.
Hobbes1839: 785The Enneti in Paphlagonia,
From whence proceedeth of wild mules the race,
Parthenius’ brook and the town Coronia,
Cytorus, Sesamus, and the high place
Of th’ Erithius, and of Ægyalus
[29]
Hobbes1839: 790The charge was given to Pylomenus,
And of the Halizons t’ Epistrophus,
But not alone; join’d with him was Dius
Of Alybe, where is a silver mine.
The leaders of the Mysians were Chronis,
Hobbes1839: 795And Enomus. Both of them could divine
By flight of birds, though they foresaw not this
That in Scamander stream they both should die,
Slain by Achilles who there massacred
Many a Trojan, many a good ally,
Hobbes1839: 800Which to the sea the river carried.
The Phrygians from Ascania, far off,
Were led by Phorcys and Ascanius;
And battle lov’d. But the commanders of
The Mæones, Mesthles and Antiphus,
Hobbes1839: 805The two sons were of old Pylomenes,
Both of them born upon Gygæna lake,
(At th’ foot of Tmolus dwell the Mæones.)
Amphimachus and Nastes charge did take
Of those of Caria, people of rude tongue;
Hobbes1839: 810And of Miletus, and the hill Phtheiron,
And of the towns that seated are among
The windings of Mæander, and upon
Mount Mycale. And Nastes carried gold
Unto the battle, like a child or sot;
Hobbes1839: 815Wherewith his life he did not buy but sold.
For slain he was; his gold Achilles got,
And left him lying at the river dead.
The succours by the Lycians sent to Troy,
By Glaucus were and King Sarpedon led.
Far off they dwelt, and a long march had they.

LIB. III.

The duel of Menelaus and Paris, for the ending of the war.
When both the armies were prepar’d for fight,
The Trojans marched on with noise and cry.
As in the air of cackling fowl a flight,
Or like the cranes when from the north they fly,
Hobbes1839: 5The army of Pygmæan men to charge,
And shun the winter, with a mighty cry
Fly through the air over the ocean large;
So swiftly march’d the Greeks, but silently
Resolved one another to assist.
[30]
Hobbes1839: 10And such a dust between both hosts did rise,
As when upon the mountains lies a mist,
Which to a stone’s cast limiteth the eyes.
(Which good for thieves is, but for shepherds not)
So great a dust the middle space possest.
Hobbes1839: 15When they were near to one another got,
Came Alexander forth before the rest.
A leopard’s skin he wore upon his shoulders,
Two spears in hand, his sword girt at his side,
Bow at his back, and brave to the beholders;
Hobbes1839: 20And any of Achæan host defied.
And glad was Menelaus to see this.
As when a lion finds a lusty prey,
A wild goat or a stag well pleased is,
And hungry seizes him without delay,
Hobbes1839: 25Although by hunters and by hounds pursu’d;
So glad was Menelaus him to see.
And soon as he his person had well view’d,
Arm’d from his char’ot to the ground leap’d he.
Assured, as he thought, revenge to take.
Hobbes1839: 30But soon as Alexander once saw that,
He fled into the throng, as from a snake
Seen unawares, trembling and pale thereat.
Then Hector him with words of great disgrace
Reprov’d and said, Fine man and lover keen,
Hobbes1839: 35Cajoler, that confidest in thy face,
I would to God thou born hadst never been,
Or never hadst been married. For that
A great deal better had been of the twain,
Than to be scorn’d of men, and pointed at
Hobbes1839: 40For one that durst not his own word maintain.
O how the Greeks are laughing now to see
That so absurdly they themselves mistook,
Supposing you some mighty man to be
That art worth nothing, judging by your look.
Hobbes1839: 45Was’t you to Lacedemon pass’d the deep,
And fetch’d fair Helen thence, the bane of Troy,
And now, when it concerns you her to keep,
You dare not in her husband’s presence stay?
For you would quickly know what kind of man
Hobbes1839: 50You have bereav’d unjustly of his wife.
Neither your cittern, nor your beauty can,
Nor other gifts of Venus save your life.
Were not the Trojans fearful more than needs,
You had a coat of stones by this time had,
Hobbes1839: 55A fit reward for all your evil deeds.
This answer then to Hector, Paris made.
Hector, since your reproof is just, said he,
And your hard language (as when help’d by art
A shipwright’s axe strikes deep into a tree)
[31]
Hobbes1839: 60Like rigid steel has cut me to the heart;
If with Atrides you would have me fight,
Object not Venus’ favours (’tis unfit
The gifts of the immortal Gods to slight),
But make the Greeks and Trojans both to sit.
Hobbes1839: 65And in the midst set me and Menelaus,
And which of us shall have the victory,
Helen be his, and all the wealth she has,
And ’twixt the Greeks and Trojans amity.
Let this be sworn to, that we may remain
Hobbes1839: 70At Troy in quiet, and the Greeks repass
To Argos and Achæa back again.
At this brave proffer Hector joyful was;
And stepping forth, the Trojan ranks kept in
With both his hands o’ th’ middle of his spear.
Hobbes1839: 75And to shoot at him the Greeks begin,
And many took up stones and hurling were.
But Agamemnon with a voice as high
As high as he could raise it, to the Greeks cried, hold.
Throw no more stones, let no more arrows fly;
Hobbes1839: 80Hector to us has somewhat to unfold.
This said, they held their hands, and silent were,
And Hector both to Greeks and Trojans spake.
May you be pleased on both sides to hear
The motion I from Alexander make.
Hobbes1839: 85Let arms, said he, on both sides be laid by,
And in the midst set him and Menelaus,
And which of them shall have the victory,
Be Helen his, with all the wealth she has.
And let the rest an oath on both sides take
Hobbes1839: 90The pacts agreed on not to violate.
When this was said, then Menelaus spake,
And both the armies with great silence sate.
Hear me too then, said Menelaus, who
By Alexander have been most offended.
Hobbes1839: 95If you’ll do that which I advise you to,
The quarrel he began will soon be ended.
Which of us two shall fall in single fight,
Let him die only, and the rest agree.
Bring forth two lambs, one black, another white,
Hobbes1839: 100To t’ Earth and Sun a sacrifice to be.
Another we will sacrifice to Jove.
And let the old King Priam present be,
(His proud sons think themselves all oaths above)
That what is sworn he may performed see.
Hobbes1839: 105No hold is to be taken of an oath
Which young men make, whose likings change like wind.
But old men can foresee what’s good for both.
’Tis good for both that makes a contract bind.
These words did to both armies sweetly sound;
[32]
Hobbes1839: 110They thought the worst was past; and up they tied
Their horses; and their spears stuck in the ground,
With spaces left between them, but not wide.
Then Hector to the king two heralds sent,
To fetch the lambs, and Priam to implore
Hobbes1839: 115To take the oath. From Agamemnon went
Talthybius to the fleet to fetch two more.
Meanwhile to the fair Helen Iris came,
So like t’ Antenor’s wife Laodice,
King Priam’s daughter, that she seem’d the same.
Hobbes1839: 120Quickly she found her; for at work was she
Upon a double splendid web, wherein
Many a cruel battle she had wrought
The Trojans and th’ incensed Greeks between,
That for her own sake only had been fought.
Hobbes1839: 125Come nymph, said Iris, see one battle more
Between the gallant men of Greece and Troy.
They fight not altogether as before,
But silent sit, and from their arms away.
Shields are their cushions, planted are their spears;
Hobbes1839: 130Paris and Menelaus only fight.
Save these two no man any armour wears;
And you his wife are, that has greatest might.
Thus Iris said, and her inspir’d anew
With love to Menelaus as before.
Hobbes1839: 135Then o’er her head a milk-white scarf she threw,
And out went weeping at the chamber door,
But not alone; two maidens follow’d her,
Fair Æthre Pittheus’ child, and Clymene.
And quickly at the Scæan gate they were,
Hobbes1839: 140Where Priam sate; and in his company
Were the old lords, Lampus and Clytius,
And Icetaon, and Ucalegon,
Antenor, Thymetes, and Panthous,
Whence both the armies they might look upon.
Hobbes1839: 145Old men they were, but had brave captains been,
And now for consultation prized were.
As soon as Helen came into their sight,
They whisper’d one another in the ear,
I cannot blame the man that for her strives,
Hobbes1839: 150Like an immortal God she is. Yet so,
Rather than we should hazard all our lives,
I should advise the king to let her go.
Thus said they one t’ another. But the king
Call’d her and said, daughter, sit down by me,
Hobbes1839: 155(Not you, but the immortal powers bring
Upon the Trojans this calamity.)
And tell me who that great Achæan is.
I see some higher by the head than he,
But comelier man I never saw than this,
[33]
Hobbes1839: 160Nor liker to a king in majesty.
O king, then answered Helen, to whom I
Of all men owe most reverence and fear,
Would I had rather chosen there to die,
Than to your son’s ill counsel given ear,
Hobbes1839: 165Leaving my house, my child, and brothers two,
And all my sweet companions for his sake.
But since I cannot what is done undo,
Unto your question I’ll now answer make.
The man you point to Agamemnon is,
Hobbes1839: 170A good king, and a valiant man in fight,
And brother to the husband is of this
Unworthy woman, me, that did him slight.
And Priam then the man admiring said,
Happy Atrides, great is thy command,
Hobbes1839: 175Whose soldiers though now very much decay’d,
In such great multitude before us stand.
At a great fight I was in Phrygia,
And brought to Otreus and Mygdon aid
Against the Amazons. I never saw
Hobbes1839: 180Till then, so many for a fight array’d,
As were the Amazons, upon the banks
Of Sangareus, and yet they fewer were,
Than are contained in the bristled ranks
Of th’ armed Greeks that stand before us here.
Hobbes1839: 185Again Ulysses coming in his sight,
Tell me, said he, sweet daughter, who is this?
He wants the head of Agamemnon’s height,
But at the breast and shoulders broader is.
His arms lie still upon the ground; but he
Hobbes1839: 190In no one certain place himself can keep,
But through the ranks and files runs busily,
Just as a ram runs in a fold of sheep.
To this Jove’s daughter, Helen, thus replies.
Ulysses ’tis, the old Laertes’ son,
Hobbes1839: 195Of Ithaca; to counsel and devise,
In all the army like him there is none.
O Helen, said Antenor, you say right;
On your affair he once came into Troy
With Menelaus. I did them both invite
Hobbes1839: 200To sup with me; and in my house they lay.
I them compar’d. When at their audience
They both stood up, Atrides taller seem’d;
Sitting Ulysses won most reverence,
And was amongst the people most esteem’d.
Hobbes1839: 205And when they were orations to make,
Atrides’ words went easily and close,
For little he, but to the purpose spake,
Though th’ younger man. But when Ulysses rose,
Upon the ground a while he fix’d his eyes,
[34]
Hobbes1839: 210Nor ever mov’d the sceptre in his hand;
You would have thought him sullen or unwise,
That did not yet his bus’ness understand.
But when his voice was raised to the height,
And like a snow upon a winter’s day
Hobbes1839: 215His gentle words fell from him, no man might
With him compare; so much his words did weigh.
Then Priam seeing Ajax, ask’d again,
What Greek is that, that taller by the head
And shoulders is than all the other men?
Hobbes1839: 220And Helen to the king thus answered,
Great Ajax; who of th’ Argives is the sconce:
And he o’ th’ other side Idomeneus,
Who was the guest of Menelaus once,
And lodg’d at Lacedemon in his house.
Hobbes1839: 225And now I see the rest, and could them name.
But Castor I and Pollux cannot see.
Two princes are they, and well known by Fame,
And by one mother brothers are to me.
Did they not pass the sea? Yes sure they did
Hobbes1839: 230Come with the rest; but are asham’d of me.
And in the Argive fleet lie somewhere hid,
And will not in my shame partakers be.
Thus Helen said, because she could not tell
Whether her brothers were alive or dead.
Hobbes1839: 235But dead they were; and, where they both did dwell,
In Lacedemon they were buried.
The heralds now the two lambs had brought in,
That for their sacrifice appointed were,
And full of noble wine a great goat skin.
Hobbes1839: 240Idæus with the golden cups stood near,
And pray’d the king to go down to the plain.
There stay for you the Greeks and Trojans both;
A peace agreed on is; but all in vain
Unless you also go and take the oath.
Hobbes1839: 245For Paris must with Menelaus fight,
And he must Helen and her wealth enjoy
Upon whose side the victory shall light;
The Greeks return; and peace remain at Troy.
These words to th’ old man’s heart came cold as ice.
Hobbes1839: 250But straight he bade his coach made ready be.
The servants made it ready in a trice,
And up into ’t Antenor went and he;
And pass’d the Scæan gate into the plain.
And when they came near to Scamander’s banks,
Hobbes1839: 255From out the coach alighted they again,
And stood between the adverse armies’ ranks.
Then Agamemnon and Ulysses came,
And to the contract for the Greeks did swear.
And Priam and Antenor swore the same.
[35]
Hobbes1839: 260The heralds mix the wine with water clear;
And poured water on the princes’ hands.
Atrides at his sword a knife did wear,
And as he near unto the victims stands,
Cuts with it from their foreheads locks of hair,
Hobbes1839: 265Which by the heralds were distributed,
Till ev’ry leader part had of the hair.
The ceremonies being finished,
Atrides to the Gods then made this prayer.
O mighty Jove, the monarch of the Gods,
Hobbes1839: 270O glorious Sun, with thy all-seeing eye,
O Streams, O Earth, O you that hold the rod
Beneath the earth, scourges of perjury,
Hear me, and be you witnesses of this.
If Menelaus be by Paris slain,
Hobbes1839: 275Let Helen and the wealth she has be his,
And to Achæ we return again.
If slain by Menelaus Paris be,
Let Helen with her wealth to Greece be sent
With some amends made for the injury,
Hobbes1839: 280To be of th’ wrong done an acknowledgment.
If such amends the Trojans will not make,
I will pursue the war, and here abide,
Till I the town of Ilium shall take,
Or till the Gods the quarrel shall decide.
Hobbes1839: 285This said, the victims with his knife he slew.
And sprawling there upon the place they lay.
Then into golden cups the wine they drew,
And pour’d it on the lambs. Then prayed they
Both Greeks and Trojans; Jove, and pow’rs divine,
Hobbes1839: 290Who first to break this peace shall go about,
As poured on the victims is this wine,
So they, and their sons’ brains be poured out.
Thus prayed they. But Jove that pray’r did slight.
Then Priam said, To Troy return will I.
Hobbes1839: 295It cannot please me to behold the fight.
For none but Gods know which of them shall die.
And then into the char’ot went again
He and Antenor, and drave t’ Ilium,
And with them carried their victims slain.
Hobbes1839: 300Then in Ulysses and great Hector come,
And having measur’d out the lists, wherein
They were to fight, then the two lots they drew
For who to throw his spear should first begin.
And then the Greeks and Trojans pray’d anew.
Hobbes1839: 305O glorious Jove, whom all the Gods obey,
Let him that of the war the author was
Be slain, and all the rest firm peace enjoy.
Then mighty Hector shook the skull of brass.
The lot that was the first drawn out, was that
[36]
Hobbes1839: 310Which gave to Paris the right to begin.
Then down upon the ground the people sate
In order as their armour plac’d had been.
And Paris arm’d himself, and first puts on
His leg-pieces of brass, and closely ties,
Hobbes1839: 315That silver’d over were at th’ ancle-bone.
And then his breast-plate to his breast applies.
Lycaon’s breast-plate ’twas, but ev’ry whit
As just upon him sat, as it had done
Upon Lycaon when he used it.
Hobbes1839: 320And next to this his good sword he puts on.
And then his broad shield and his helmet good.
And last of all a spear takes in his hand.
And in like armour Menelaus stood.
Then come they forth, and in the lists they stand.
Hobbes1839: 325And one did on another fiercely look.
(The people stupid sat ’twixt hope and fear.)
And when they come were nigh, their spears they shook.
But Paris was the first to throw his spear,
And threw, and smote the shield of Menelaus,
Hobbes1839: 330But through the mettle tough it passed not,
But turn’d, and bended at the point it was.
Then Menelaus was to throw by lot.
But first he prayed. Grant me, O Jove, said he,
That this my spear may Alexander slay,
Hobbes1839: 335Who was the first that did the injury;
That they who shall be born hereafter may
Not dare to violate the sacred laws
Of hospitality. Having thus said,
He threw his spear, which Paris’ shield did pass,
Hobbes1839: 340And through his breast-plate quite, and there it stay’d;
But tore his coat. And there he had been dead,
But that his belly somewhat he drew back.
Then with his sword Atrides smote his head
Which arm’d was, and the sword in pieces broke.
Hobbes1839: 345Then Menelaus grieved at the heart,
Looking to heaven did on Jove complain.
O Jove, that of the Gods most cruel art,
Broken my sword, my spear is thrown in vain.
Then suddenly laid hold on Paris’ crest,
Hobbes1839: 350And to the Greeks to drag him did begin,
And Paris then was mightily distrest,
Choakt by the latchet underneath his chin.
And to the Greeks had dragg’d been by the head,
If Venus to his aid had not come in,
Hobbes1839: 355Who broke the string and him delivered.
Atrides’ conquest else had famous been.
Then to the Greeks the empty cask he threw.
But Venus snatcht him from him in a mist.
And whither she convey’d him none there knew.
[37]
Hobbes1839: 360A God she is, and can do what she list.
When Paris to his chamber was convey’d,
His chamber which of perfumes sweetly smelt,
Then puts she on the form of an old maid
That Helen serv’d when she at Sparta dwelt.
Hobbes1839: 365And in that shape went to call Helen home,
That stood with other ladies of the town
Upon a tow’r. When she was to her come,
She gently with her finger stirr’d her gown.
Helen, said she, Paris has for you sent,
Hobbes1839: 370And on his glorious bed doth for you stay,
Not as a man that came from fight, but went
To dance, or from it were new come away.
Helen at this was mov’d, and mark’d her eyes,
And of her lovely neck did notice take,
Hobbes1839: 375And knew ’twas Venus though in this disguise;
And troubled as she was, thus to her spake.
Venus, why seek you to deceive me still,
Since Menelaus has the victory?
Though I have wrong’d him, he receive me will,
Hobbes1839: 380And you come hither now to hinder me.
Whither d’ye mean to send me further yet;
To Phrygia or to Mœonia,
That there I may another husband get?
You shall not me to Alexander draw.
Hobbes1839: 385Go to him you, and Heaven for ever quit;
Grieve with him; have a care the man to save,
And by his side continually to sit,
Till he his bride have made you, or his slave.
I will not to him go (for ’twere a shame)
Hobbes1839: 390Nor any longer meddle with his bed,
Nor longer bear the scorns, nor mocks, nor blame
Which from the wives of Troy I suffered.
Then Venus vext, Hussie, said she, no more
Provoke my anger. If I angry be,
Hobbes1839: 395And hate you as I loved you before,
The armies both will to your death agree.
This said, the beauteous Helen frighted was,
And with the Goddess went, who led the way,
And by the Trojan wives did quiet pass
Hobbes1839: 400Unto the house where Alexander lay.
I’th’ rooms below at work her women were,
But up went Helen with the Goddess fair.
And when to Alexander they were near,
The Goddess unto Helen fetcht a chair.
Hobbes1839: 405Then sat she down, and look’d at him again.
You come from battle. I would you had there
And by my former husband’s hand, been slain.
You bragg’d you were his better at a spear.
Go challenge him again, and fight anew.
[38]
Hobbes1839: 410But do not though, for fear you should be kill’d
But rather when you see him, him eschew,
Lest he should leave you dead upon the field.
To Helen Alexander then replied.
Forbear; though he have now the victory
Hobbes1839: 415By Pallas’ help; there are Gods on our side,
And they another time may favour me.
Let’s go to bed, and in sweet love agree.
Your beauty never did me so much move,
At Lacedemon, nor in Cranae;
Hobbes1839: 420Where the first blessing I had of your love.
This said, to bed they went, first he, then she.
Atrides then sought Paris in the throng
O’th’ Trojans and their aids; but could not see
Nor hear of him the company among.
Hobbes1839: 425They would not have conceal’d him though they might;
But had to Menelaus him betray’d.
So hateful to the Trojans was his sight.
Then stood King Agamemnon up and said,
Hear me ye Trojans and your aids. ’Tis plain
Hobbes1839: 430That Menelaus has the victory.
Let Helen therefore rendered be again,
And pay your fine. ’Tis right, the Greeks all cry.
===LIB. III.===
The duel of Menelaus and Paris, for the ending of the war.
When both the armies were prepar’d for fight,
The Trojans marched on with noise and cry.
As in the air of cackling fowl a flight,
Or like the cranes when from the north they fly,
Hobbes1839: 5The army of Pygmæan men to charge,
And shun the winter, with a mighty cry
Fly through the air over the ocean large;
So swiftly march’d the Greeks, but silently
Resolved one another to assist.
[30]
Hobbes1839: 10And such a dust between both hosts did rise,
As when upon the mountains lies a mist,
Which to a stone’s cast limiteth the eyes.
(Which good for thieves is, but for shepherds not)
So great a dust the middle space possest.
Hobbes1839: 15When they were near to one another got,
Came Alexander forth before the rest.
A leopard’s skin he wore upon his shoulders,
Two spears in hand, his sword girt at his side,
Bow at his back, and brave to the beholders;
Hobbes1839: 20And any of Achæan host defied.
And glad was Menelaus to see this.
As when a lion finds a lusty prey,
A wild goat or a stag well pleased is,
And hungry seizes him without delay,
Hobbes1839: 25Although by hunters and by hounds pursu’d;
So glad was Menelaus him to see.
And soon as he his person had well view’d,
Arm’d from his char’ot to the ground leap’d he.
Assured, as he thought, revenge to take.
Hobbes1839: 30But soon as Alexander once saw that,
He fled into the throng, as from a snake
Seen unawares, trembling and pale thereat.
Then Hector him with words of great disgrace
Reprov’d and said, Fine man and lover keen,
Hobbes1839: 35Cajoler, that confidest in thy face,
I would to God thou born hadst never been,
Or never hadst been married. For that
A great deal better had been of the twain,
Than to be scorn’d of men, and pointed at
Hobbes1839: 40For one that durst not his own word maintain.
O how the Greeks are laughing now to see
That so absurdly they themselves mistook,
Supposing you some mighty man to be
That art worth nothing, judging by your look.
Hobbes1839: 45Was’t you to Lacedemon pass’d the deep,
And fetch’d fair Helen thence, the bane of Troy,
And now, when it concerns you her to keep,
You dare not in her husband’s presence stay?
For you would quickly know what kind of man
Hobbes1839: 50You have bereav’d unjustly of his wife.
Neither your cittern, nor your beauty can,
Nor other gifts of Venus save your life.
Were not the Trojans fearful more than needs,
You had a coat of stones by this time had,
Hobbes1839: 55A fit reward for all your evil deeds.
This answer then to Hector, Paris made.
Hector, since your reproof is just, said he,
And your hard language (as when help’d by art
A shipwright’s axe strikes deep into a tree)
[31]
Hobbes1839: 60Like rigid steel has cut me to the heart;
If with Atrides you would have me fight,
Object not Venus’ favours (’tis unfit
The gifts of the immortal Gods to slight),
But make the Greeks and Trojans both to sit.
Hobbes1839: 65And in the midst set me and Menelaus,
And which of us shall have the victory,
Helen be his, and all the wealth she has,
And ’twixt the Greeks and Trojans amity.
Let this be sworn to, that we may remain
Hobbes1839: 70At Troy in quiet, and the Greeks repass
To Argos and Achæa back again.
At this brave proffer Hector joyful was;
And stepping forth, the Trojan ranks kept in
With both his hands o’ th’ middle of his spear.
Hobbes1839: 75And to shoot at him the Greeks begin,
And many took up stones and hurling were.
But Agamemnon with a voice as high
As high as he could raise it, to the Greeks cried, hold.
Throw no more stones, let no more arrows fly;
Hobbes1839: 80Hector to us has somewhat to unfold.
This said, they held their hands, and silent were,
And Hector both to Greeks and Trojans spake.
May you be pleased on both sides to hear
The motion I from Alexander make.
Hobbes1839: 85Let arms, said he, on both sides be laid by,
And in the midst set him and Menelaus,
And which of them shall have the victory,
Be Helen his, with all the wealth she has.
And let the rest an oath on both sides take
Hobbes1839: 90The pacts agreed on not to violate.
When this was said, then Menelaus spake,
And both the armies with great silence sate.
Hear me too then, said Menelaus, who
By Alexander have been most offended.
Hobbes1839: 95If you’ll do that which I advise you to,
The quarrel he began will soon be ended.
Which of us two shall fall in single fight,
Let him die only, and the rest agree.
Bring forth two lambs, one black, another white,
Hobbes1839: 100To t’ Earth and Sun a sacrifice to be.
Another we will sacrifice to Jove.
And let the old King Priam present be,
(His proud sons think themselves all oaths above)
That what is sworn he may performed see.
Hobbes1839: 105No hold is to be taken of an oath
Which young men make, whose likings change like wind.
But old men can foresee what’s good for both.
’Tis good for both that makes a contract bind.
These words did to both armies sweetly sound;
[32]
Hobbes1839: 110They thought the worst was past; and up they tied
Their horses; and their spears stuck in the ground,
With spaces left between them, but not wide.
Then Hector to the king two heralds sent,
To fetch the lambs, and Priam to implore
Hobbes1839: 115To take the oath. From Agamemnon went
Talthybius to the fleet to fetch two more.
Meanwhile to the fair Helen Iris came,
So like t’ Antenor’s wife Laodice,
King Priam’s daughter, that she seem’d the same.
Hobbes1839: 120Quickly she found her; for at work was she
Upon a double splendid web, wherein
Many a cruel battle she had wrought
The Trojans and th’ incensed Greeks between,
That for her own sake only had been fought.
Hobbes1839: 125Come nymph, said Iris, see one battle more
Between the gallant men of Greece and Troy.
They fight not altogether as before,
But silent sit, and from their arms away.
Shields are their cushions, planted are their spears;
Hobbes1839: 130Paris and Menelaus only fight.
Save these two no man any armour wears;
And you his wife are, that has greatest might.
Thus Iris said, and her inspir’d anew
With love to Menelaus as before.
Hobbes1839: 135Then o’er her head a milk-white scarf she threw,
And out went weeping at the chamber door,
But not alone; two maidens follow’d her,
Fair Æthre Pittheus’ child, and Clymene.
And quickly at the Scæan gate they were,
Hobbes1839: 140Where Priam sate; and in his company
Were the old lords, Lampus and Clytius,
And Icetaon, and Ucalegon,
Antenor, Thymetes, and Panthous,
Whence both the armies they might look upon.
Hobbes1839: 145Old men they were, but had brave captains been,
And now for consultation prized were.
As soon as Helen came into their sight,
They whisper’d one another in the ear,
I cannot blame the man that for her strives,
Hobbes1839: 150Like an immortal God she is. Yet so,
Rather than we should hazard all our lives,
I should advise the king to let her go.
Thus said they one t’ another. But the king
Call’d her and said, daughter, sit down by me,
Hobbes1839: 155(Not you, but the immortal powers bring
Upon the Trojans this calamity.)
And tell me who that great Achæan is.
I see some higher by the head than he,
But comelier man I never saw than this,
[33]
Hobbes1839: 160Nor liker to a king in majesty.
O king, then answered Helen, to whom I
Of all men owe most reverence and fear,
Would I had rather chosen there to die,
Than to your son’s ill counsel given ear,
Hobbes1839: 165Leaving my house, my child, and brothers two,
And all my sweet companions for his sake.
But since I cannot what is done undo,
Unto your question I’ll now answer make.
The man you point to Agamemnon is,
Hobbes1839: 170A good king, and a valiant man in fight,
And brother to the husband is of this
Unworthy woman, me, that did him slight.
And Priam then the man admiring said,
Happy Atrides, great is thy command,
Hobbes1839: 175Whose soldiers though now very much decay’d,
In such great multitude before us stand.
At a great fight I was in Phrygia,
And brought to Otreus and Mygdon aid
Against the Amazons. I never saw
Hobbes1839: 180Till then, so many for a fight array’d,
As were the Amazons, upon the banks
Of Sangareus, and yet they fewer were,
Than are contained in the bristled ranks
Of th’ armed Greeks that stand before us here.
Hobbes1839: 185Again Ulysses coming in his sight,
Tell me, said he, sweet daughter, who is this?
He wants the head of Agamemnon’s height,
But at the breast and shoulders broader is.
His arms lie still upon the ground; but he
Hobbes1839: 190In no one certain place himself can keep,
But through the ranks and files runs busily,
Just as a ram runs in a fold of sheep.
To this Jove’s daughter, Helen, thus replies.
Ulysses ’tis, the old Laertes’ son,
Hobbes1839: 195Of Ithaca; to counsel and devise,
In all the army like him there is none.
O Helen, said Antenor, you say right;
On your affair he once came into Troy
With Menelaus. I did them both invite
Hobbes1839: 200To sup with me; and in my house they lay.
I them compar’d. When at their audience
They both stood up, Atrides taller seem’d;
Sitting Ulysses won most reverence,
And was amongst the people most esteem’d.
Hobbes1839: 205And when they were orations to make,
Atrides’ words went easily and close,
For little he, but to the purpose spake,
Though th’ younger man. But when Ulysses rose,
Upon the ground a while he fix’d his eyes,
[34]
Hobbes1839: 210Nor ever mov’d the sceptre in his hand;
You would have thought him sullen or unwise,
That did not yet his bus’ness understand.
But when his voice was raised to the height,
And like a snow upon a winter’s day
Hobbes1839: 215His gentle words fell from him, no man might
With him compare; so much his words did weigh.
Then Priam seeing Ajax, ask’d again,
What Greek is that, that taller by the head
And shoulders is than all the other men?
Hobbes1839: 220And Helen to the king thus answered,
Great Ajax; who of th’ Argives is the sconce:
And he o’ th’ other side Idomeneus,
Who was the guest of Menelaus once,
And lodg’d at Lacedemon in his house.
Hobbes1839: 225And now I see the rest, and could them name.
But Castor I and Pollux cannot see.
Two princes are they, and well known by Fame,
And by one mother brothers are to me.
Did they not pass the sea? Yes sure they did
Hobbes1839: 230Come with the rest; but are asham’d of me.
And in the Argive fleet lie somewhere hid,
And will not in my shame partakers be.
Thus Helen said, because she could not tell
Whether her brothers were alive or dead.
Hobbes1839: 235But dead they were; and, where they both did dwell,
In Lacedemon they were buried.
The heralds now the two lambs had brought in,
That for their sacrifice appointed were,
And full of noble wine a great goat skin.
Hobbes1839: 240Idæus with the golden cups stood near,
And pray’d the king to go down to the plain.
There stay for you the Greeks and Trojans both;
A peace agreed on is; but all in vain
Unless you also go and take the oath.
Hobbes1839: 245For Paris must with Menelaus fight,
And he must Helen and her wealth enjoy
Upon whose side the victory shall light;
The Greeks return; and peace remain at Troy.
These words to th’ old man’s heart came cold as ice.
Hobbes1839: 250But straight he bade his coach made ready be.
The servants made it ready in a trice,
And up into ’t Antenor went and he;
And pass’d the Scæan gate into the plain.
And when they came near to Scamander’s banks,
Hobbes1839: 255From out the coach alighted they again,
And stood between the adverse armies’ ranks.
Then Agamemnon and Ulysses came,
And to the contract for the Greeks did swear.
And Priam and Antenor swore the same.
[35]
Hobbes1839: 260The heralds mix the wine with water clear;
And poured water on the princes’ hands.
Atrides at his sword a knife did wear,
And as he near unto the victims stands,
Cuts with it from their foreheads locks of hair,
Hobbes1839: 265Which by the heralds were distributed,
Till ev’ry leader part had of the hair.
The ceremonies being finished,
Atrides to the Gods then made this prayer.
O mighty Jove, the monarch of the Gods,
Hobbes1839: 270O glorious Sun, with thy all-seeing eye,
O Streams, O Earth, O you that hold the rod
Beneath the earth, scourges of perjury,
Hear me, and be you witnesses of this.
If Menelaus be by Paris slain,
Hobbes1839: 275Let Helen and the wealth she has be his,
And to Achæ we return again.
If slain by Menelaus Paris be,
Let Helen with her wealth to Greece be sent
With some amends made for the injury,
Hobbes1839: 280To be of th’ wrong done an acknowledgment.
If such amends the Trojans will not make,
I will pursue the war, and here abide,
Till I the town of Ilium shall take,
Or till the Gods the quarrel shall decide.
Hobbes1839: 285This said, the victims with his knife he slew.
And sprawling there upon the place they lay.
Then into golden cups the wine they drew,
And pour’d it on the lambs. Then prayed they
Both Greeks and Trojans; Jove, and pow’rs divine,
Hobbes1839: 290Who first to break this peace shall go about,
As poured on the victims is this wine,
So they, and their sons’ brains be poured out.
Thus prayed they. But Jove that pray’r did slight.
Then Priam said, To Troy return will I.
Hobbes1839: 295It cannot please me to behold the fight.
For none but Gods know which of them shall die.
And then into the char’ot went again
He and Antenor, and drave t’ Ilium,
And with them carried their victims slain.
Hobbes1839: 300Then in Ulysses and great Hector come,
And having measur’d out the lists, wherein
They were to fight, then the two lots they drew
For who to throw his spear should first begin.
And then the Greeks and Trojans pray’d anew.
Hobbes1839: 305O glorious Jove, whom all the Gods obey,
Let him that of the war the author was
Be slain, and all the rest firm peace enjoy.
Then mighty Hector shook the skull of brass.
The lot that was the first drawn out, was that
[36]
Hobbes1839: 310Which gave to Paris the right to begin.
Then down upon the ground the people sate
In order as their armour plac’d had been.
And Paris arm’d himself, and first puts on
His leg-pieces of brass, and closely ties,
Hobbes1839: 315That silver’d over were at th’ ancle-bone.
And then his breast-plate to his breast applies.
Lycaon’s breast-plate ’twas, but ev’ry whit
As just upon him sat, as it had done
Upon Lycaon when he used it.
Hobbes1839: 320And next to this his good sword he puts on.
And then his broad shield and his helmet good.
And last of all a spear takes in his hand.
And in like armour Menelaus stood.
Then come they forth, and in the lists they stand.
Hobbes1839: 325And one did on another fiercely look.
(The people stupid sat ’twixt hope and fear.)
And when they come were nigh, their spears they shook.
But Paris was the first to throw his spear,
And threw, and smote the shield of Menelaus,
Hobbes1839: 330But through the mettle tough it passed not,
But turn’d, and bended at the point it was.
Then Menelaus was to throw by lot.
But first he prayed. Grant me, O Jove, said he,
That this my spear may Alexander slay,
Hobbes1839: 335Who was the first that did the injury;
That they who shall be born hereafter may
Not dare to violate the sacred laws
Of hospitality. Having thus said,
He threw his spear, which Paris’ shield did pass,
Hobbes1839: 340And through his breast-plate quite, and there it stay’d;
But tore his coat. And there he had been dead,
But that his belly somewhat he drew back.
Then with his sword Atrides smote his head
Which arm’d was, and the sword in pieces broke.
Hobbes1839: 345Then Menelaus grieved at the heart,
Looking to heaven did on Jove complain.
O Jove, that of the Gods most cruel art,
Broken my sword, my spear is thrown in vain.
Then suddenly laid hold on Paris’ crest,
Hobbes1839: 350And to the Greeks to drag him did begin,
And Paris then was mightily distrest,
Choakt by the latchet underneath his chin.
And to the Greeks had dragg’d been by the head,
If Venus to his aid had not come in,
Hobbes1839: 355Who broke the string and him delivered.
Atrides’ conquest else had famous been.
Then to the Greeks the empty cask he threw.
But Venus snatcht him from him in a mist.
And whither she convey’d him none there knew.
[37]
Hobbes1839: 360A God she is, and can do what she list.
When Paris to his chamber was convey’d,
His chamber which of perfumes sweetly smelt,
Then puts she on the form of an old maid
That Helen serv’d when she at Sparta dwelt.
Hobbes1839: 365And in that shape went to call Helen home,
That stood with other ladies of the town
Upon a tow’r. When she was to her come,
She gently with her finger stirr’d her gown.
Helen, said she, Paris has for you sent,
Hobbes1839: 370And on his glorious bed doth for you stay,
Not as a man that came from fight, but went
To dance, or from it were new come away.
Helen at this was mov’d, and mark’d her eyes,
And of her lovely neck did notice take,
Hobbes1839: 375And knew ’twas Venus though in this disguise;
And troubled as she was, thus to her spake.
Venus, why seek you to deceive me still,
Since Menelaus has the victory?
Though I have wrong’d him, he receive me will,
Hobbes1839: 380And you come hither now to hinder me.
Whither d’ye mean to send me further yet;
To Phrygia or to Mœonia,
That there I may another husband get?
You shall not me to Alexander draw.
Hobbes1839: 385Go to him you, and Heaven for ever quit;
Grieve with him; have a care the man to save,
And by his side continually to sit,
Till he his bride have made you, or his slave.
I will not to him go (for ’twere a shame)
Hobbes1839: 390Nor any longer meddle with his bed,
Nor longer bear the scorns, nor mocks, nor blame
Which from the wives of Troy I suffered.
Then Venus vext, Hussie, said she, no more
Provoke my anger. If I angry be,
Hobbes1839: 395And hate you as I loved you before,
The armies both will to your death agree.
This said, the beauteous Helen frighted was,
And with the Goddess went, who led the way,
And by the Trojan wives did quiet pass
Hobbes1839: 400Unto the house where Alexander lay.
I’th’ rooms below at work her women were,
But up went Helen with the Goddess fair.
And when to Alexander they were near,
The Goddess unto Helen fetcht a chair.
Hobbes1839: 405Then sat she down, and look’d at him again.
You come from battle. I would you had there
And by my former husband’s hand, been slain.
You bragg’d you were his better at a spear.
Go challenge him again, and fight anew.
[38]
Hobbes1839: 410But do not though, for fear you should be kill’d
But rather when you see him, him eschew,
Lest he should leave you dead upon the field.
To Helen Alexander then replied.
Forbear; though he have now the victory
Hobbes1839: 415By Pallas’ help; there are Gods on our side,
And they another time may favour me.
Let’s go to bed, and in sweet love agree.
Your beauty never did me so much move,
At Lacedemon, nor in Cranae;
Hobbes1839: 420Where the first blessing I had of your love.
This said, to bed they went, first he, then she.
Atrides then sought Paris in the throng
O’th’ Trojans and their aids; but could not see
Nor hear of him the company among.
Hobbes1839: 425They would not have conceal’d him though they might;
But had to Menelaus him betray’d.
So hateful to the Trojans was his sight.
Then stood King Agamemnon up and said,
Hear me ye Trojans and your aids. ’Tis plain
Hobbes1839: 430That Menelaus has the victory.
Let Helen therefore rendered be again,
And pay your fine. ’Tis right, the Greeks all cry.

LIB. IV.

The articles broken by the Trojans.
Mean while the Gods at counsel drinking sat.
Hebe the nectar carried up and down.
And Jove amongst them present was thereat,
And sitting had his eyes upon Troy town.
Hobbes1839: 5Then Jupiter puts out a word, to see
What Juno would unto the same reply.
Two Goddesses assistants are (said he)
To Menelaus, but sit idly by,
Pallas and Juno; but on th’other side
Hobbes1839: 10Venus gives Paris aid, and really
Has helpt him when he thought he should have died;
Though Menelaus have the victory.
But let us now think which the best will be,
To suffer war to make an end of Troy,
Hobbes1839: 15Or let Troy stand and make them to agree,
And Helen with Atrides go her way.
Juno and Pallas that together sat,
Grumble and plot; Pallas her spite kept in.
But such of Juno was the choler, that
[39]
Hobbes1839: 20Had she not spoke, her heart had broken been.
Harsh Jove, said she, what do you mean by this?
Shall I with so much sweat, and labour spent,
And horses tir’d, now of my purpose miss?
Do. But the other Gods will not consent.
Hobbes1839: 25Devil, said Jove, what hurt is done to you
By Priam and his sons, that you should so
Fiercely the ruin of the town pursue?
I think if you int’ Ilium should go,
And eat up Priam and his children all,
Hobbes1839: 30And every Trojan in the town beside,
Man, woman, child alive within the wall,
Your anger will at last be satisfied.
Do as you please. It shall breed no contention
’Twixt you and me. But then remember this,
Hobbes1839: 35When I to raze a city have intention
That yours, and greatly in your favour is,
To let me do’t without plea or request;
Since to give you your will I lose my own.
For Ilium I love above the rest,
Hobbes1839: 40Though under Heaven be many a goodly town.
For I by Priam and his people still
Have honour’d been, my altars richly serv’d
With wine and sacrifices to my will,
Which is the honour to the Gods reserv’d.
Hobbes1839: 45To this the Goddess Juno then replied,
Three cities I prefer before the rest,
Argos, and Sparta, and Mycena wide.
Destroy you may which of them you think best,
If you see cause; I’ll not stand in your way.
Hobbes1839: 50Or if I do, what mends can I have so?
For since your power does mine so much outweigh,
It will be done whether I will or no.
But you ought not t’undo what I have done,
For I a Goddess am, and have the same
Hobbes1839: 55Parents, of whom you boast to be the son.
And further of your wife I bear the name,
Whom mortals and immortals all obey.
Then let us not in such things disagree.
But I to you, and you to me give way.
Hobbes1839: 60For of our two minds all the Gods will be.
Let Pallas to the army straight be sent
To make the Trojans first the peace to break.
And Jupiter to do so was content,
And did (as he was bid) to Pallas speak.
Hobbes1839: 65Pallas, said he, down to the armies go,
Let not this peace be by the Trojans kept.
When Pallas heard her father Jove say so,
Glad of the errand, from the sky she leapt,
Just like a falling star, which Saturn sends
[40]
Hobbes1839: 70To armies or unto seafaring men;
Which change of fortune, commonly portends.
The Goddess through the air descending then,
Splendid and sparkling on the ground did light.
The armies that were in the field array’d,
Hobbes1839: 75Both Greeks and Trojans wond’red at the sight;
And one unto another next him said,
This bloody war will sure return again,
Or else the peace be surer made than ’tis;
But which o’ th’ two Jove has not yet made plain,
Hobbes1839: 80Who both of peace and war disposer is.
Pallas the form took of Laodocus,
Antenor’s son, and went into the throng
O’ th’ Trojans to inquire for Pandarus.
At last she found him his own troops among,
Hobbes1839: 85That were of Lycaonia the bands,
And from Zeleia led by Pandarus
To Ilium. There Pallas by him stands
Like to Antenor’s son; and to him thus:
Lycaon’s son, says she, dare you let fly
Hobbes1839: 90A shaft at Menelaus? For I know
The Trojans all would thank you, specially
Paris, the son of Priam, and bestow
Great presents on you if you should him kill.
Shoot at him then, and to Apollo pray,
Hobbes1839: 95The God of archers, that he help you will.
And vow a hecatomb of lambs to pay,
When to Zeleia safely you come home.
For there your people to Apollo vow.
When this was said, the vain man overcome,
Hobbes1839: 100From off his shoulders taketh down his bow,
(Which did a lusty goat’s head once adorn,
Which with a shaft he killed had among
The rocks, and taken from his head the horn,
Which was no less than sixteen handfuls long.
Hobbes1839: 105And to a fletcher gave it to be wrought,
Shaven, and polish’d, and gilt at the hand.)
This bow he bent; and lest the foe should know’t,
He crouched down, and laid it on the sand.
But lest the Greeks should rush on him, before
Hobbes1839: 110He ready were to shoot, they that stood near,
Before him with their bucklers stood good store.
And being now delivered of that fear,
From out the quiver takes an arrow keen,
And new, well wing’d to carry mischief true,
Hobbes1839: 115Which shot before that time had never been.
But yet his vow before his arrow flew.
Phœbus, said he, if I Atrides slay;
As soon as I shall to Zeleia come,
I vow unto your deity to pay
[41]
Hobbes1839: 120Of my first-yeaned lambs an hecatomb.
Then to his breast he drew the leather string,
And to the bow return’d the arrow head.
Out leapt the shaft, and as it went did sing
Amongst the throng, as pleas’d man’s blood to shed.
Hobbes1839: 125And, Menelaus, now the Gods you blest,
And chiefly Pallas, that before you stood,
And turn’d the deadly arrow from your breast,
About as much as a kind mother could
From her child’s face divert a busy fly;
Hobbes1839: 130And made it on the golden buckle fall,
Where of his breast-plate double was the ply,
And though it pass’d through buckle, plate, and all,
And girdle which his coat unto him bound,
The shaft into his body penetrated,
Hobbes1839: 135And made, though not a great one, yet a wound,
The force it went with being much abated;
Yet out the blood ran. As when ivory
Is stain’d with crimson, to adorn the cheeks
Of the proud steeds, and please the driver’s eye,
Hobbes1839: 140Many a cavalier to have it seeks.
The dame that stain’d it then holds up the prize,
And keeps it by her as a precious thing;
So lovely seems the colour to her eyes,
As to be sold to none but to a king.
Hobbes1839: 145So look’d his body when the streams of blood
His iv’ry legs and insteps did defile.
But Agamemnon stiff with horror stood;
And so did Menelaus for a while.
But when he saw the arrow barbs appear
Hobbes1839: 150Above the nerve, his courage came again.
But Agamemnon, not yet out of fear,
Did of the Trojans’ perjury complain.
Brother, said he, and took him by the hand,
Dear brother, ’tis the oath that has you slain,
Hobbes1839: 155Making you thus before the Trojans stand.
But sure I am the oath cannot be vain,
Confirmed with so great solemnity.
They shall, though late, pay for it with their lives;
(For Jove ne’er fails to punish perjury)
Hobbes1839: 160Both they themselves, their children, and their wives.
For I well know the fatal day will come
To Priam, and to Priam’s people all.
Jove will his black shield shake o’er Ilium,
And for this ugly action make it fall.
Hobbes1839: 165This, Menelaus, is a thing to come.
But what if of your wound you chance to die?
The Argives straight will think of going home.
How by the Greeks then scorned shall be I!
How proud will Priam and the Trojans be,
[42]
Hobbes1839: 170When Argive Helen shall be left behind,
And your bones rotting in the ground they see,
Without effecting what they had design’d?
Some trampling on your grave perhaps will say,
Would Agamemnon thus would always vent
Hobbes1839: 175His choler, as he now has done at Troy,
Now gone with empty ships back to repent,
Leaving his brother Menelaus here.
Then should I wish the earth would swallow me.
But Menelaus, to displace that fear,
Hobbes1839: 180Fright not the army, brother, thus said he.
Not mortal is the wound. ’Twixt me and death
My armour and the clasps stood, all of brass;
Besides a good tough girdle underneath.
Pray God ’t be true, said he to Menelaus,
Hobbes1839: 185But we must send for a chirurgeon,
To mitigate with lenitives the pain.
Talthybius, said he, call Machaon,
And having found him quickly come again.
Tell him he must to Menelaus come,
Hobbes1839: 190Who by a foe is with an arrow shot,
Trojan or Lycian, I know not whom,
That with great grief to us has honour got.
This said, the herald went and look’d about
Amongst the troops of Tricca which he led.
Hobbes1839: 195Nor was it long before he found him out
With many targetiers environed.
You must, said he, to Menelaus come,
Who by some foe is with an arrow shot,
Trojan or Lycian, I know not whom,
Hobbes1839: 200That, with great grief to us, has honour got.
’Tis Agamemnon calls you. Then they pass
Together through the host, and hastened
Till they were come where Menelaus was
With many other lords encompassed.
Hobbes1839: 205There Machaon the arrow first pulls out.
(The barbs were broken as they came away)
Then took he off his armour and his coat.
Then sucked he the wound the blood to stay;
And laid on unguents to allay the pain.
Hobbes1839: 210Meanwhile the Trojans arm’d were coming in.
And then the Greeks were forc’d to arm again.
And Agamemnon’s virtue now was seen.
He did not at their coming sleep nor start,
But speedily prepared for the fight,
Hobbes1839: 215And of a chief commander did the part,
His own commanders first to disaffright.
His horses and his chariot he sent off.
T’ Eurymeaon, the son of Ptolemy,
The son of Pirus he gave charge thereof,
[43]
The first battle.
Hobbes1839: 220And bad him with it always to be nigh,
To use when labour tired had his knees.
Through the great army then on foot he went,
And where them hasting to the fight he sees,
He gives them in few words encouragement.
Hobbes1839: 225On, Argives, and be sure Jove never fights
Against good men for such perfidious knaves,
But leave them will for food to dogs and kites,
And to their foes their wives and children slaves.
But where he saw the soldiers negligent,
Hobbes1839: 230His admonition was then severe.
Fie, Argives, what d’ you fear? To what intent
Stand you thus staring like a herd of deer?
Just like so many deer that had been chased
O’er some great plain looking about they stay,
Hobbes1839: 235So stand you here like frighted deer amazed,
Till to our ships come down the troops of Troy,
To try if Jove will help you there or no.
Thus he commanding went the host throughout.
And when the martial Cretans he came to,
Hobbes1839: 240Where armed stood Idomeneus stout.
(Meriones the rear led, he the van)
And Agamemnon look’d on them with joy;
And to Idomeneus thus began.
Of all the Greeks that me assist at Troy
Hobbes1839: 245I value you the most, both in the war
And otherwise. And when at feast we drink,
Other men’s cups by measure stinted are,
But yours, as mine, stands always full to th’ brink.
The King of Crete replied, I shall, said he,
Hobbes1839: 250Continue still your good confederate,
As heretofore I promis’d you to be.
But go, and th’ other leaders animate,
That we may with the Trojans quickly fight.
Then woe be to them, sure they are to die
Hobbes1839: 255Who of the Gods and sacred oaths make light.
Then on went Agamemnon joyfully;
And came to the quarters of the Ajaxes,
There armed both complete, and followed
With a huge multitude of Greeks he sees,
Hobbes1839: 260And ready to the battle to be led.
As when a shepherd from a hill espies
A full-charg’d cloud march tow’rds him in the deep,
It seems as black as pitch unto his eyes,
And makes him seek a shelter for his sheep;
Hobbes1839: 265So black the squadrons of the Ajaxes,
And horrible with thick and upright spears
T’ Atrides seem, and well it did him please,
And both of them he thus commends and cheers.
O Ajaxes, expect not I should bid
[44]
Hobbes1839: 270You hearten up your army for the fight;
’Tis done so well already, there’s no need.
O Jove, Apollo, Pallas, that I might
Find all the other leaders such as you,
We should not need from Argos long to stay
Hobbes1839: 275Ere we the town of Priam should subdue
And rifle. And this said, he went away,
And came to Nestor, who was ordering
His troops and bands of horse and foot, each one
Against the enemy encouraging.
Hobbes1839: 280And with him stood Alastor, Pelagon,
Hæmon, and Chromius, skilful men in war.
I’ th’ front the char’ots and the horsemen were.
The most and best infantry placed are
(A hedge unto the battle in the rear.)
Hobbes1839: 285The middle ranks were filled up with those,
Upon whose courage he did least rely.
For these would fight because they could not choose;
Since they could neither back nor forward fly.
And Nestor to the horsemen spake. Let none,
Hobbes1839: 290Said he, before another go, to shew
His manhood or his skill. But all go on
At once. To single is to weaken you.
Further, If any of you should have need
To mount into another’s chariot,
Hobbes1839: 295There let him use his spear; but still take heed
That with the horses reins he meddle not.
Our fathers have before us us’d these laws,
And thereby many cities level laid.
Thus Nestor taught them. Glad Atrides was,
Hobbes1839: 300And with great approbation to him said,
O Nestor, that your arms were but as strong
As is your mind! But they’re decay’d by age.
Or could you give your age to some man young,
And with the youngest of the foes engage.
Hobbes1839: 305Atrides, then said Nestor, so wish I.
Would I were as when Eruthalyon
I slew. But Gods’ gifts come successively.
I then was young; and age is now come on.
But as I am I’ll ride amongst my horse,
Hobbes1839: 310And as becomes an old man, give advice,
While they that may presume upon their force,
With spear in hand charge on their enemies.
Atrides pass’d on to th’ Athenians
That by Menestheus commanded were.
Hobbes1839: 315And by these stood the Cephalonians
Ulysses’ bands. Neither of these did hear
The clamour of the battle new begun,
But stood unmoved, because they did expect
Some greater troops of Greeks should first fall on.
[45]
Hobbes1839: 320For this Atrides grievously them check’d.
Menestheus, said he, son of a king,
And you the crafty man Ulysses, why
When you your men should to the battle bring,
Stand you here shrinking from the enemy?
Hobbes1839: 325You hear the first when there will be a feast,
And stay for no man. For your messes are
Greater than other men’s; your wine the best,
And without stint. And therefore in the war
You should strive who should be the first to fight.
Hobbes1839: 330But now, though ten troops were before you there,
You would not be displeased with the sight.
These words came harshly to Ulysses’ ear,
And with a frowning look, what’s this, said he,
Are we not making all the haste we can?
Hobbes1839: 335Telemachus his father you shall see
By and by fighting in the Trojan van,
And that this reprehension needless was.
But Agamemnon smiling then replied,
(Seeing his censure did not kindly pass)
Hobbes1839: 340Noble Ulysses, I meant not to chide,
Nor to direct you, that so skilful are.
For we are both of us of the same mind.
What’s said amiss I shall again repair.
But let it now away go with the wind.
Hobbes1839: 345Then on he went and came to Diomed,
Whom mounted on his chariot he found
With Capaneus’ son accompanied,
And other lords that him encompass’d round.
Ay me, Tydides, wherefore stand you thus,
Hobbes1839: 350As if you for some bridge did look about.
You do not as your father Tydeus,,
Who still before his fellows leaped out.
So said they that had seen him at the war,
Which I did not, but take it upon fame,
Hobbes1839: 355Which him above the rest preferred far.
But certain ’tis, he to Mycena came
With Polynices, to desire their aid
Against the Thebans. And they willingly
Had granted it, but that they were afraid.
Hobbes1839: 360For Jove forbad them by a prodigy.
Then to the brook Asopus back they went,
Which doth the Theban territory bound.
To Tydeus the Greeks a letter sent
To enter Thebes, and terms of peace propound.
Hobbes1839: 365To Thebes he went, and with Eteocles
He found the chief o’ th’ Thebans at a feast.
And at all manly games the prize with ease,
By Pallas’ help, he carried from the best.
And when for spite they sent out fifty men
[46]
Hobbes1839: 370With Mæon Hæmon’s son, and Lycophon
To murder him as he went back again,
Slain by Tydeus they were all but one.
For he sav’d Mæon, warned by the Gods.
Such Tydeus was, but left a son behind
Hobbes1839: 375That less could do, but for words had the odds.
But valiant Diomed reply declined,
Who gave t’Atrides what respect was due.
The other answered him with language rude.
You say, said he, what you know is not true.
Hobbes1839: 380We than our fathers there more manhood shew’d.
For we with fewer men proud Thebes did gain,
By Jove’s help, and observances divine,
Whilst the Cadmeans for their pride were slain.
How from our fathers then do we decline?
Hobbes1839: 385But straight reprov’d he was by Diomed.
My friend, said he, are you more grieved than I?
Would you not have the army ordered?
Atrides, both i’ th’ loss and victory
Is most concern’d. Let us of battle think,
Hobbes1839: 390And down he leapt, as soon as that was said,
In complete arms, with such a sudden chink,
As might a constant man have made afraid.
As when the billows of the sea rais’d high
By some great wind, go rolling to the shore,
Hobbes1839: 495And follow one another to the dry,
There stopp’d and broken are, and foam, and roar:
So then the Greeks up to the Trojans come,
Obeying each his leader silently,
(You would have thought them, though so many, dumb)
Hobbes1839: 400In glittering arms, and glorious to the eye.
On th’other side, the Trojans made a noise,
Like ewes a milking kept off from their lambs
When in the field abroad they hear their cries,
And they again bleat back unto their dams.
Hobbes1839: 405But did not one another understand;
For few there were whose language was the same.
Some were of one, some of another land,
And most of them from far off thither came.
Pallas the Greeks, Mars Trojans favoured.
Hobbes1839: 410Then Fright came in, with (Mars his sister) Strife,
Little when born, but grew until her head
Was in the clouds; for she grows all her life.
But when the armies were together near,
Then man to man came close, and shield to shield,
Hobbes1839: 415And mingled in the front was spear with spear,
And horrible the noise was in the field;
Whilst some insult and others groaning die.
And th’earth they stood on covered was with blood.
As when great torrents from the mountains high
[47]
Hobbes1839: 420Pour down into the valleys a great flood;
The streams through thousand channels falling roar;
The trembling shepherds hear it on the hills.
So much the noise o’th’ battle the air tore,
And all the region with terror fills.
Hobbes1839: 425A Trojan was the first man that was slain,
Echepolus son of Thalysias.
He smote was with a spear into the brain;
Antilochus the man that smote him was.
His armour rattled on him as he fell,
Hobbes1839: 430As if some tow’r had fall’n. But then Elphenor
(To strip him of his arms that hoped well)
Dragging him off was killed by Agenor.
For whilst in stooping he his flank unhides.
Agenor quickly his advantage spies,
Hobbes1839: 435And pierc’d him with his spear through both his sides.
Then down he fell, and darkness seiz’d his eyes.
And then about his body rose great strife,
And one upon another falling on,
Antheman’s son, a fair youth, lost his life,
Hobbes1839: 440Slain by great Ajax, son of Telamon,
And Simoisius called was by name,
’Cause born upon the bank of Simois,
Whither from Ida both his parents came
To view their flocks, lest aught should be amiss;
Hobbes1839: 445But had no joy of him. He was unblest
To be the first that came in Ajax’s way,
Who smote him with his spear quite through the breast.
There dead he fell, and by the river lay.
As when a man has fell’d a poplar tree,
Hobbes1839: 450Tall, straight, and smooth, with many fair boughs on,
Of which he meant a cart-wheel made shall be,
And leaves it on the bank to dry i’ th’ sun;
So lay the comely Simoisius,
Slain by great Ajax, son of Telamon.
Hobbes1839: 455At Ajax then a spear threw Antiphus,
Bright-arm’d Antiphus, King Priam’s son.
Death the spear carries, but of Ajax misses,
And deadly wounds the groin of Leucus bold,
And well beloved soldier of Ulysses,
Hobbes1839: 460Who dragg’d the dead, but now lets go his hold.
Ulysses, angry that his friend was slain,
Went out before the rest, and coming close
To th’ Trojan front, some fit revenge to gain.
Democoon, King Priam’s son, he chose,
Hobbes1839: 465(A lawful son where nature is the law).
The Trojans when they saw him look about,
Into the shelter of the ranks withdraw.
Then soon his spear Democoon pick’d out,
And through both temples forward went the head.
[48]
Hobbes1839: 470Then heavily he falls, his armour chinks,
His eyes with endless night are covered,
And Hector with his Trojans from him shrinks.
The Greeks then shouted, and drew off their slain,
And on the Trojans pressing further were.
Hobbes1839: 475But then Apollo cried out amain
From Pergam tow’r, O Trojans, what d’ye fear?
Go on upon the Greeks; no more give way.
Their bodies neither are of stone nor steel,
Nor able are the force of brass to stay,
Hobbes1839: 480No less than you the wounds it makes they feel.
Nor fights Achilles here, but angry lies,
And wishes that the Greeks were overthrown.
So Phœbus. ’Mongst the Argives Pallas flies,
Through ranks and files encouraging each one.
Hobbes1839: 485And then Diores slain was with a stone,
By Pyros, whom the Thracians obey’d.
Crush’d of his right leg was the ankle-bone,
And in the dust upon his back was laid,
Unto his fellows holding up his hands.
Hobbes1839: 490Ready to die he for assistance cries.
Pyros comes quickly in, and o’er him stands,
And wounds him in the belly. Then he dies.
But Thoas then slew Pyros with his spear,
That pass’d his breast till in his lungs it stopp’d.
Hobbes1839: 495Then coming in he drew his sword, and there
His belly ripp’d till out his bowels dropp’d,
But to disarm him could not stay, because
So many Thracians about him stood.
Then back retir’d he, and well pelted was,
Hobbes1839: 500Leaving two leaders wrapp’d in dust and blood,
One an Epeian, th’ other Thracian,
And many others lying by them dead.
This battle was well fought. Although a man
Through both the armies safely had been led
Hobbes1839: 505By Pallas, and protected by her shield,
He had no want of courage seen that day,
So many Greeks and Trojans in the field
Depriv’d of life by one another lay.

LIB. V.

And Pallas now t’ ennoble Diomed
Amongst the Greeks, with force did him inspire,
Whereby his heart and hands were strengthened;
And on his shield and helmet stood a fire
[49]
The first battle continued, wherein Pallas strengtheneth Diomedes to supply the absence of Achilles.
Hobbes1839: 5Bright as th’ autumnal star above his head
And shoulders flaming. And straightway he runs
(Set on by Pallas and encouraged)
Into the throng, where were the two good sons
Of Dares, who was Vulcan’s priest. Well skill’d
Hobbes1839: 10They both were in the war. Idæus one,
The other Phegus. These seeing him i’ th’ field
On foot, and not far from them, and alone,
Met him; and Phegus threw, but hit him not.
For o’er his shoulder flew the spear in vain.
Hobbes1839: 15Then Diomedes threw, and Phegus smote,
Clean through the breast. When Phegus thus was slain
Down leap’d Idæus from the chariot;
But durst not by his brother’s body stay.
For if he had, the like fate he had got.
Hobbes1839: 20But Vulcan in a smoke took him away,
Not willing that his priest should childless die.
Tydides to the ships the horses sent.
To see these two, one slain, the other fly,
To the proud Trojans’ very hearts it went.
Hobbes1839: 25But Pallas then took Mars by th’ hand, and said,
Mars, bloody Mars, to what end stay we here?
Let’s neuters be. For I am much afraid
We both shall too much anger Jupiter.
This said, she led him out, and set him on
Hobbes1839: 30Scamander’s bank. And then the Trojans fled
Before the Greeks. Each leader killed one,
Pressing them at their backs uncovered.
Then Dalius first his char’ot turn’d about,
And open lay to Agamemnon’s spear,
Hobbes1839: 35Which in at’s back, and at his breast went out.
Down fell the Alizonian charioteer.
Idomeneus slew Phæstus with a thrust,
As up into his chariot he went,
The spear at the right shoulder passed just,
Hobbes1839: 40And back again unto the earth him sent.
And Menelaus slew Scamandrius,
That well the art of hunting understood.
I’ th’ hills and woods none was more dexterous,
But Dian, and his skill did him no good.
Hobbes1839: 45For Menelaus pierc’d him back and breast,
Between the shoulders with a deadly spear,
And down he tumbled of life dispossest,
His eyes with endless darkness covered were.
Meriones slew Phoriclus, the son
Hobbes1839: 50Of Harmonides, the great architect,
That, but by Pallas, taught had been by none.
But of his art unhappy was th’ effect.
’Twas he that built those ships for Alexander,
That brought with him so much ill luck to Troy,
[50]
Hobbes1839: 55And to himself, and to his chief commander;
Not knowing what the oracles did say.
But he, as from the fight he fled, was here
O’ertaken by Meriones, and slain.
At his right buttock entered the spear;
Hobbes1839: 60And at his groin the point came out again.
Meges Pedæus slew, Antenor’s son,
Though not his wife’s, yet was his wife so kind
T’ Antenor, that she bred him as her own,
And look’d upon him with a mother’s mind.
Hobbes1839: 65Him Meges overtaking as he fled
Slew with his strong sharp-pointed spear, which lighting
Behind upon the noddle of his head,
Forward he fell, the senseless weapon biting.
And then Eurypylus, Euæmon’s son,
Hobbes1839: 70Hypsenor slew, new made Scamander’s priest,
That from him, but not fast enough, did run.
Eurypylus shav’d off his hand at th’ wrist.
For at his shoulder though he aim’d the stroke,
The quick sword finding there the brass resist,
Hobbes1839: 75Slipt down unto his hand with force unbroke,
And there in streams of blood his soul dismiss’d.
Meanwhile Tydides, like a man enraged,
Ran up and down the field. One could not know
With whom and where he was in fight engaged,
Hobbes1839: 80Whether amongst the Greeks, or with the foe.
As when a torrent falling from the hills
Distends itself with fury on the plain,
And suddenly the river overfills,
Supplied by Jove with mighty showers of rain,
Hobbes1839: 85And beareth down the bridges as it goes;
No fence of vineyard can against it stand,
But all the husbandry of men o’erthrows,
And uncontrolled passes o’er their land;
Tydides so brake through each Trojan band,
Hobbes1839: 90And made them fly before him as he went.
And Pandarus then took his bow in hand,
And a sharp arrow from it to him sent,
Which pass’d through the right shoulder of his coat
Of mail, and fetch’d the blood, and with great joy,
Hobbes1839: 95Trojans, cried he, no more stand so remote.
For wounded is the stoutest foe of Troy,
And long he cannot the sore pain endure,
Unless my faith in Phœbus be in vain.
Thus said he boasting. For he thought ’twas sure
Hobbes1839: 100The wound was mortal, and Tydides slain.
Tydides to his char’ot did then retreat,
And Sthenelus alighting on the ground
(For sitting he was on the char’ot-seat)
Drew out the cruel arrow from the wound,
[51]
Hobbes1839: 105And out the blood gush’d. Then Tydides pray’d,
O Pallas, Jove’s all-conquering child, said he,
If e’er you did me or my father aid,
Within my spear’s reach let me this man see,
That with his arrow me prevented has,
Hobbes1839: 110And boasting says, I have not long to live.
Athena to his wish indulgent was,
And to him did more strength and courage give.
Fear not, said she, to go into the throng,
And charge i’ th’ thickest of the enemies.
Hobbes1839: 115For I have made thee as thy father strong,
And taken have the mist off from thy eyes,
That thou mayst see who Gods are, who are men.
If any God oppose thee, give him way,
Except if Venus thou encounter; then
Hobbes1839: 120Spare her no more than mortals in the fray.
This said, away the Goddess Pallas went,
And Diomed went to the fight again,
And though before he were upon it bent,
His courage now was trebled by his pain.
Hobbes1839: 125As when a shepherd sees a lion come,
And wounds him slightly as he leaps the pen;
Then leaves his sheep, and frighted runneth home,
And dares not in the field appear again;
The lion now made fiercer than before,
Hobbes1839: 130Lays all the sheep one by another dead,
And back again the pen once more leaps o’er:
So rag’d amongst the Trojans Diomed.
Astynous there, and Hypenor died;
One through the breast he pierced with his spear;
Hobbes1839: 135And th’ other’s head did from his neck divide
With his broad sword. And slain he left them there,
And overtook Abas and Polyeide,
Sons of Eurydamas, who could tell what
Upon a dream should to a man betide,
Hobbes1839: 140And slew them both. No dream had told him that.
Thoon and Xanthus then he followed,
Phænop’s two sons, gotten when he was old,
And of them both the vital blood did shed;
Th’ estate to strangers came to have and hold.
Hobbes1839: 145Then Chromius and Echemon he slew,
Two sons of Priam, in one chariot,
Whom from the seat unto the ground he threw,
And till he had disarm’d them left them not.
But to the ships he sent away the horses.
Hobbes1839: 150Æneas seeing how he disarray’d
Before him as he went the Trojan forces,
Sought Pandarus, and having found him, said,
Lycaon’s son, where are thy shafts and bow,
And skill, wherein the Lycians yield to thee?
[52]
Hobbes1839: 155See you the man that rages yonder now?
Aim a shaft at him whosoe’er he be,
For many valiant Trojans he has slain.
(Unless he be one of the Gods above
Neglected by us) ’twill not be in vain.
Hobbes1839: 160Shoot boldly then, but first invoking Jove.
Then Pandarus replying, to him said,
’Tis Diomed as far as can be guess’d.
His horses, and his shield I have survey’d,
And plaited horse-hair hanging at his crest.
Hobbes1839: 165Though it be he, as I believe it is,
Yet sure some God does on his shoulders sit.
For else of killing him how could I miss,
When I his shoulder with my arrow hit?
For I one arrow shot at him before,
Hobbes1839: 170And verily believ’d I had him slain.
His armour all besmeared was with gore,
But slew him not. Now here he is again.
I did not on a char’ot hither come,
Although Lycaon have eleven new,
Hobbes1839: 175With handsome curtains to each one, at home,
And horses fit to draw them not a few.
The old knight too advis’d me earnestly
That when to battle I the Trojans led,
I from a car should charge the enemy;
Hobbes1839: 180But to his counsel I not hearkened.
(Which I repent.) It came into my head
That when within Troy’s walls we should be pent,
My horses, which were us’d to be well fed,
Would there be useless wanting nourishment.
Hobbes1839: 185This made me come without a chariot,
And march, as far as ’twas, to Troy on foot,
And trust unto my bow, which helps me not,
But faileth me as often as I shoot.
For two of them I have already shot,
Hobbes1839: 190Tydides and Atrides, and good store
Of blood have drawn from both, though killed not,
But made them fiercer than they were before.
In an ill hour sure I took down my bow
To fight for Hector and the Trojan men;
Hobbes1839: 195But if I safely to my country go,
And to my house and wife get back again,
Let any man that will cut off my head,
If presently my bow I do not burn,
That never yet my hopes has answered.
Hobbes1839: 200For why not, when it doth not serve my turn?
To Pandarus Æneas then replied:
No, say not so, but first let’s to him go.
For by th’ encounter soon it will be tried
Whether he be indeed a God or no.
[53]
Hobbes1839: 205Get up into the seat, and you shall see
The virtue of my horses on the plain,
And if some God with Diomedes be,
How nimbly they will fetch us off again.
Come, take the whip and reins in hand, and I
Hobbes1839: 210Descend will from the chariot and fight.
Or if you please, when to him we are nigh
I’ll hold the whip and reins, and you alight.
No, no, said he, keep you the reins in hand,
The horses us’d thereto will you obey.
Hobbes1839: 215To me, it may be, they will restive stand,
And to the foe themselves and us betray.
Let me alight and meet him with my spear.
This said, they mounted both; and coming on
Towards Tydides, both observed were
Hobbes1839: 220By Sthenelus Copaneus his son,
Who warning to Tydides gave. I see
Two mighty men to fight us coming on,
Of which I know th’ one Pandarus to be,
The other Venus and Anchises’ son.
Hobbes1839: 225Come up into your chariot and retire.
But frowning he replied, I’ll ne’er do that
It not becomes the children of my sire,
When they should fight to double nor to squat.
I loath to sit upon a chariot,
Hobbes1839: 230And as I am I will attend them here.
For of my strength deprived I am not,
And Pallas has forbidden me to fear.
I doubt not but to kill them both, or one.
If both, your reins unto the two wheels tie,
Hobbes1839: 235And to Æneas’ horses quickly run,
And seize their reins, less frighted they should fly.
Then send them to the ships, brave steeds, well bred;
Of heavenly race they are, and got by those,
Which Jove, to make amends for Ganymed,
Hobbes1839: 240Was pleas’d to give unto his father Tros.
Anchises privily convey’d to these,
Six mares, and had a colt by ev’ry one;
Whereof he gave two to his son Æneas.
To take these horses now were bravely done.
Hobbes1839: 245While they were talking, th’other two came nigh,
And then said Pandarus, O Diomed,
Since my swift arrow could not make you die,
I come to try now how my spear will speed.
And as he spake the spear flew from his hand
Hobbes1839: 250And pass’d his shield, but in his armour stayed.
Y’are hit, said he, and long you cannot stand.
But Diomed, nothing at all dismayed,
No, no, cried out, your spear is thrown in vain.
But I believe before we have done here,
[54]
Hobbes1839: 255That one of you, if not both, will be slain.
And as he spake he at him threw his spear.
Which at his nose close by his eye went in,
And struck his teeth out, and cut off his tongue,
And out again it pass’d beneath his chin.
Hobbes1839: 260For Pallas from above it downward flung.
There dead he lay. Æneas to defend
His body, to him came with spear and shield,
And ’bout him went, resolv’d the man to send
To hell, that should oppose him in the field.
Hobbes1839: 265Tydides then took up a mighty stone
Which two men scarce could bear such as are now.
But Diomedes swinging it alone,
The same with ease did at Æneas throw,
And hit him on the huckle bone, wherein
Hobbes1839: 270Into the hip inserted is the thigh.
And torn was by the rugged stone the skin,
And tendons broken which the joint did tie.
Then down upon his knees and hands he fell,
And taken from him was his sight with pain.
Hobbes1839: 275That Venus saw him lying thus ’twas well;
Else by Tydides he had there been slain.
For then came Venus down, and with the lap
Of her celestial robe him covered,
Lest any of the Greeks should have the hap
Hobbes1839: 280To kill or wound him as from earth he fled.
But Stheneius rememb’ring well his order,
Tied his own steeds up to his chariot-wheels,
And led them out o’th’ tumult and disorder,
And to Deiphilus that was at’s heels,
Hobbes1839: 285(His friend) he gave the horses of Æneas
To carry them unto the Argive fleet.
But took Tydides’ horses, and with these
To try went if Tydides he could meet.
But he in chase of Venus now was gone
Hobbes1839: 290(Knowing that she a tender Goddess was,
And for the war commission had none,
Nor had as Pallas any shield of brass.)
And had when he came to her wounded her.
For through her robe, though by the Graces made,
Hobbes1839: 295Without resistance quickly pass’d the spear,
And at her wrist did her fair hand invade.
And from the wound out sprang the blood divine,
(Not such as men have in their veins, but ichor.
For Gods that neither eat bread nor drink wine
Hobbes1839: 300Have in their veins another kind of liquor,
And therefore bloodless and immortal be.)
And Venus screaming then lets fall her son,
But by Apollo’s hand preserv’d was he,
Convey’d thence in a mist perceiv’d by none,
[55]
Hobbes1839: 305For fear he should be by some Argive slain.
To Venus then Tydides whoop’d, and said,
Away, Jove’s daughter, from the war abstain.
Go practise how to cozen wife or maid,
For I believe if here you longer stay,
Hobbes1839: 310(So many such as these mishaps there are)
That you therein will have but little joy,
And troubled be when men but talk of war.
This said, away she went, not knowing where
She was; and great the pain was of her hand.
Hobbes1839: 315But Iris from the fight conducted her,
And set her hard by Mars upon the sand.
For there by Pallas placed he had been.
His horses and his char’ot by him staid
Hid in a mist, by man not to be seen.
Hobbes1839: 320And Venus there before him kneeling said,
Dear brother, let me your good horses have,
To bear me to Olympus from the fray;
This cruel wound mad Diomed me gave,
And would wound Jove if he came in his way.
Hobbes1839: 325Mars presently his horses to her lent.
Venus and Iris mount into the seat;
Iris the reins held, and away they went;
The time they spent in going was not great.
When they were there, Iris the steeds untied,
Hobbes1839: 330And set them up, and gave unto them meat,
Such as immortal horses use to eat,
Ambrosian meat, till they were satisfied.
But Venus fell into Diones’ lap,
Her mother, who embrac’d her lovingly,
Hobbes1839: 335Strok’d her, and said, how came this sad mishap?
Who used you thus? What a rash God was he?
What more could he have done, if he had found
You doing something openly amiss?
It was a man, said she, gave me this wound,
Hobbes1839: 340Tydides; and for nothing else but this;
I sav’d my son Æneas from his hand,
My dearest son, whom he was going to slay.
And now the war is all (I understand)
’Twixt Greeks and Heaven, not ’twixt Greeks and Troy.
Hobbes1839: 345Daughter (replied Dione then) ’tis hard,
For we the Gods that in Olympus dwell
Many from men as ill as you have far’d,
And many no less wrongs have put up well.
Otus and Ephialtes, Neptune’s sons,
Hobbes1839: 350In a brass dungeon once imprison’d Mars,
And kept him in the dark there thirteen moons.
There like he was t’have stayed till now, for scarce
Could Hermes set him free with all his art
And Juno’s help. And when to liberty
[56]
Hobbes1839: 355He was restor’d, he took it in good part,
Though with his chains he gall’d was cruelly.
When Hercules shot Juno in the breast,
Though wounded sore, yet she reveng’d it not.
And Pluto by the same man shot did rest
Hobbes1839: 360Contented, and no reparation got.
But to the house of Jupiter he went,
And got the arrow pluck’d out from the wound
By Pæon; who with gentle plaisters sent
The pain away, and made his shoulder sound.
Hobbes1839: 365But though no God of any wound can die,
Yet of Amphitryon the peevish son
(Who little cares at whom his arrows fly)
Great mischief oft unto the Gods has done.
But Pallas ’tis that thus has wounded you,
Hobbes1839: 370Though with Tydides spear. Fool as he was,
What ’tis to wound a God he never knew.
Not long such wicked deeds unpunish’d pass.
Such men when they return from painful war
Shall seldom set their children on their knee
Hobbes1839: 375Pleas’d with their half-form’d words. Let him beware
Lest he provoke some stronger Deity,
And then Ægilia Diomede’s wife
Awake the household with her lamentation,
And cry, Tydides, thou hast lost thy life,
Hobbes1839: 380O my dear husband, best of all the nation.
This said, she wip’d the ichor from her hand,
And straight her hand was well, the pain was gone.
Then Juno by, and Pallas, jeering stand.
And Pallas thus to Jupiter begun.
Hobbes1839: 385Shall I say what I think? O father Jove,
Venus some Argive dame has courting been
To take the Trojan’s part, whom she doth love,
And stroking her, her hand scratch’d with a pin.
Jove smil’d at this, and then to Venus said,
Hobbes1839: 390Daughter, I gave you no command in war.
That charge on Mars and Pallas I have laid.
Of nuptials and love take you the care.
While they were thus discoursing, Diomed
Did with great speed and rage Æneas follow,
Hobbes1839: 395To gain his armour and his blood to shed,
Knowing he was in th’ hands now of Apollo.
Undaunted then, with shield before his breast,
And sword in hand, struck at Æneas thrice,
And thrice again Phœbus his rage repress’d.
Hobbes1839: 400But at the fourth time gave him good advice.
Retire, said he, Tydides, and beware
You not yourself think equal to the Gods.
They sway the heav’ns, on earth men creeping are.
’Twixt mortals and immortals there’s great odds.
[57]
Hobbes1839: 405Tydides then retir’d a little way,
Not knowing what harm might from Phœbus come.
And Phœbus thence Æneas did convey
T’ a temple of his own in Pergamum.
There Leto and Diana cur’d his wound.
Hobbes1839: 410And then an image Phœbus like him made,
And in like arms, and set it on the ground,
For which the foes each other then invade,
And there they one another’s bucklers hew.
To Mars Apollo speaking, why, said he,
Hobbes1839: 415Mars, bloody, murd’ring Mars, why suffer you
Tydides at the battle still to be?
Mad as he is now, he with Jove would fight.
From Venus’ hand he made the blood run down,
And then at me he flew like any sprite.
Hobbes1839: 420This said, he sat o’ th’ top of Pergam town.
And Mars the Trojan bands encouraged,
Taking the shape of valiant Acamas,
Who to the war at Troy the Thracians led.
And as he through the armed ranks did pass,
Hobbes1839: 425Children of Priam what d’ye mean, said he;
Shall the Greeks follow killing us to Troy?
Fall’n is Æneas, the great man whom we
Like Hector honour’d. Come, let’s if we may
This good commander rescue. Thus said he.
Hobbes1839: 430Sarpedon likewise Hector sharpen’d. Where
Are now your kin you said enough would be
Troy to defend? I see none of them here.
Like hounds about a lion off they stand,
We your confederates the fight maintain.
Hobbes1839: 435The labour lieth all upon our hand;
And I myself amongst the rest would fain
Make trial of this mighty man in fight.
At least I shall, as doth a friend become,
My people’s courage all I can excite;
Hobbes1839: 440Since they are here, and very far from home;
And though from me the Greeks can nothing get,
Neither to carry nor to drive away.
But you to th’ Trojans have not spoken yet,
So much as to defend their wives in Troy
Hobbes1839: 445From being taken in the Argives’ net,
And plund’red be the stately town of Troy.
When chiefly you on this your heart should set,
And your confederates persuade to stay,
And not the fault on one another lay.
Hobbes1839: 450So said Sarpedon. Hector therewith stung,
Upon his chariot could no longer stay,
But armed down unto the ground he sprung.
And ’mongst the Trojan ranks and files he goes,
Into their hearts new courage to inspire.
[58]
Hobbes1839: 455And then they turn’d their faces to their foes.
Nor did the Argives from their place retire.
And then, as when on Ceres’ sacred floor
The winnowed chaff lies heap’d together white,
So white the troops of Argives were all o’er
Hobbes1839: 460With dust their horses rais’d had in the fight.
And then the Trojans boldly marched on,
And Mars to aid them dark’ned had the field,
As he was bidden by Latona’s son,
When Pallas from the Greeks removed her shield.
Hobbes1839: 465And from the Temple fetch’d Æneas out
Alive and whole, and bold, and made him stand
Amongst the troops, that joyful stood about.
But other work now lying on their hand,
(Made them by Mars and Strife) no time had they
Hobbes1839: 470To ask him questions. But encouraged
The Argives were by th’ Ajaxes to stay,
And by Ulysses and by Diomed.
For of the Trojans they were not afraid.
But as a cloud that resteth on a hill,
Hobbes1839: 475Which in calm weather there by Jove is laid,
Till boisterous winds arise it resteth still.
Then up and down went Agamemnon there,
My friends, said he, be bold, and fight like men,
Of one another’s censure stand in fear.
Hobbes1839: 480Of them that do so, fewer perish than
Of those that fly and never think upon
The loss of fame. This said, he threw his spear
And smote Æneas’ friend Democoon,
Who was unto the Trojans no less dear
Hobbes1839: 485Than if he one of Priam’s sons had been.
For with the foremost he was still in fight.
And at his buckler went the weapon in,
And through both that and belt it passed quite.
And mortal in his belly was the wound,
Hobbes1839: 490And with his armour rat’ling down he fell.
Æneas then two Greeks laid on the ground,
The sons of Diocles, descended well.
For of th’ immortal and fair stream Alpheus,
Orsilochus a great king was the son.
Hobbes1839: 495And he the father was of Diocles,
And he Orsilochus got and Crethon;
Brave men, who when they came to man’s estate
With Atreus’ son his honour to regain,
To Ilium sail’d, and there they met their fate,
Hobbes1839: 500And never to their country came again.
As when two lions in the mountains bred
And woods obscure, come down into the plain,
And sheep and cattle in the field leave dead,
Until at last by hunters they are slain;
[59]
Hobbes1839: 505So fell these two men by Æneas kill’d,
And like two fir trees straight laid on the sand.
And Menelaus then with fury fill’d,
With helmet on his head, and spear in hand,
Advanced boldly to Anchises’ son,
Hobbes1839: 510In hope to have deprived him of breath.
And Mars himself it was that set him on
To bring him by Æneas’ hand to death.
Antilochus then, Nestor’s valiant son,
Fearing lest Menelaus should be slain,
Hobbes1839: 515Resolv’d he should not fight with him alone,
And all their toil at Ilium make vain.
Went after him, and overtook him as
They ready were to fight, but nothing done.
Æneas then, as valiant as he was,
Hobbes1839: 520Retir’d, eschewing th’ odds of two to one.
And when they had brought off the bodies slain,
And left them in their fellow-soldiers’ hands,
Unto the skirmish they returned again,
And slew the Prince of Paphlagonians
Hobbes1839: 525Pylæmines. Atrides threw the spear
Which near the shoulder pass’d into his neck.
By Nestor’s son slain was his charioteer,
Mydon by name that did his horses check,
As he his char’ot turning was to fly,
Hobbes1839: 530Antilochus him wounded with a stone
On th’ elbow, and benumb’d his hand, whereby
The sense he had to hold the reins was gone.
The reins fell down, and then with sword in hand
Antilochus divides his head in twain,
Hobbes1839: 535And headlong fell he where it chanc’d the sand
Was very deep, and there he did remain
With head and shoulders sticking in the sands.
But upright in the air were both his hips.
The horses laid him flat. Which by the hands
Hobbes1839: 540Of Nestor’s son convey’d were to the ships.
Hector saw this, and in came with great cry,
Whom bands of lusty Trojans followed,
Mars and Bellona marching furiously
Against the Argives to the fight them led.
Hobbes1839: 545Bellona brought in tumult and affright.
And Mars a mighty spear had in his hand.
And sometimes after Hector went i’ th’ fight,
Sometimes before, and oft did by him stand.
Tydides when he saw him was afraid,
Hobbes1839: 550As when a man in haste has lost his way,
And running on is at some river stayed,
That’s deep and swift, he runs as fast away;
So he retir’d. And to his Argives said,
No wonder ’tis if Hector valiant be;
[60]
Hobbes1839: 555One God or other always gives him aid,
And near him stands from death to set him free.
Now Mars comes with him, like a mortal wight.
Retire. But turn your faces to the foe,
Forbearing still against the Gods to fight.
Hobbes1839: 560This said he, but the Trojans near were now.
And Hector there had slain two men that sat
Together, Mnestheus and Anchialus,
Both warriors good. But Ajax griev’d thereat,
(The greater Ajax, Telamonius)
Hobbes1839: 565Darted his heavy spear at Amphius.
Rich was he both in lands and goods, and dwelt
At Pæsus: and fought here for Priamus.
But by the spear which pass’d quite through his belt
Upon his belly took a mortal wound.
Hobbes1839: 570And as he fell, Ajax ran fiercely in
To strip him of his armour on the ground,
And stript him had, had he not hindered been.
For from the Trojans came a shower of spears,
Whereof his shield received not a few.
Hobbes1839: 575Then to be hemm’d in by the foe he fears.
His own spear he recover’d and withdrew.
Whilst they in stubborn war thus toiling were,
Unlucky fate Tlepolemus brought on
To charge Sarpedon; and when they were near
Hobbes1839: 580Together come, Jove’s grandson and his son,
Tlepolemus said then, what need had you,
Unskilful in the war, to tremble here?
Jove’s son men say you are, but ’tis not true.
No such weak men by Jove begotten were;
Hobbes1839: 585But such as Hercules is said t’have been,
Courageous as a lion; with few men
In but six ships, this strong town he did win,
And rifled it, and safe went off again.
But you are weak, your men a great part dead,
Hobbes1839: 590And can but little help afford to Troy,
And though from Lycia you were strengthened,
I mean to send you now another way.
To this Sarpedon answered, ’Tis true
That Hercules sack’d Troy, because the steeds
Hobbes1839: 595Laomedon kept back that were his due,
And gave him evil language for good deeds.
But you from me shall present death receive,
For which I shall have honour truly paid,
And you your soul shall now to Pluto leave.
Hobbes1839: 600And this Sarpedon had no sooner said,
Than from their hands the spears together started.
Tlepolemus clean through the neck was struck,
And from him presently his life departed.
But from Sarpedon Jove kept such ill luck;
[61]
Hobbes1839: 605Yet on his left thigh he receiv’d a wound:
For through it went the spear close by the bone.
Sarpedon, by his friends borne off the ground,
Was plac’d apart where battle there was none,
Tormented with the spear still in his thigh.
Hobbes1839: 610To pull it out they all had quite forgot.
In so great haste they were, the foe so nigh,
The time so little, and the fight so hot.
Meanwhile Tlepolemus his body dead
The Greeks fetch’d off. The wise Ulysses then
Hobbes1839: 615Within himself a while considered,
Whether to charge Sarpedon or his men.
But since by fate Sarpedon was to die
By other, and not by Ulysses’ hands,
Athena made him lay that purpose by,
Hobbes1839: 620And turn his anger on the Lycians.
Alastor then he slew, and Cœramus,
Alcander, Prytanis, and Noemon.
And Halius he slew, and Chromius,
And many Lycians more had overthrown,
Hobbes1839: 625But mighty Hector now approached near
In glittering arms, and brought with him affright.
But glad Sarpedon was to see him there;
And when he was come up unto him quite,
Himself lamenting, thus to Hector said,
Hobbes1839: 630Leave me not, Hector, to the Greeks a prey,
But let my body in your ground be laid,
Since I my country must no more enjoy,
Nor my beloved wife and tender son.
So said Sarpedon. Hector not replies,
Hobbes1839: 635But to the enemy he passeth on;
And as he goes the ground with blood he dies.
Under a beech, sacred to Jupiter
Sarpedon placed was upon the ground,
And gently Pelagon pull’d out the spear;
Hobbes1839: 640The pain hereof put him into a swound.
Lost was his sight; but by a gentle wind
And cool, that from the north upon him blew,
He soon recover’d both his sight and mind,
And all the company about him knew.
Hobbes1839: 645To Mars and Hector still the Greeks gave way
And still their faces to the Trojans were,
But for to charge none durst advance or stay.
For Diomed had told them Mars was there.
Now tell me, Muse, who slain by Hector was?
Hobbes1839: 650Trechus, Orestes, Teuthras, Helenus,
(Whose father Œnops was) and Œnonaus;
And last of all wealthy Oresbius.
In Hyla on Cephisses lake he dwelt,
The richest pasture of Bœotia,
[62]
Hobbes1839: 655And known was by the gayness of his belt.
This slaughter of the Greeks when Juno saw,
She then to Pallas spake. Pallas, said she,
If we let Mars still play the madman here,
Our word to Menelaus false will be,
Hobbes1839: 660That he from Troy return should conqueror.
Let’s courage take, and try what we can do.
Pallas contented, ’twas agreed upon.
And Juno ready made herself to go,
And quickly the coachwheels Hebe sets on.
Hobbes1839: 665Eight spokes each wheel had, and were all of brass,
And fixed round about at th’ axle-tree.
The axle-tree itself of iron was,
The circle gold, and wonderful to see.
But arm’d it was above with plates of brass.
Hobbes1839: 670The naves on both sides were of silver white,
With gold and silver wire extended was
The seat, which had two silver rings and bright,
In which the beam of silver fast’ned stayed;
At the other end th’ golden yoke she tied,
Hobbes1839: 675And on the yoke the golden reins she laid.
And Juno then no longer could abide,
But to the coach herself the horses brought,
From quarrels so impatiently she stayed.
Pallas threw off her robe, and took Jove’s coat,
Hobbes1839: 680And with the same she there herself array’d.
And then her breast with armour covered,
And on her shoulder hung her frightful shield,
Wherein Strife, Force, Flight, Chase, were figured,
With all the horror of a foughten field;
Hobbes1839: 685And in the middle stood out Gorgoe’s head.
Then put she on her golden helmet, that
Ten thousand men’s heads might have covered,
And to the chariot up she went, and sat,
And her great heavy spear takes in her hands
Hobbes1839: 690The spear wherewith, when she displeased is,
She scatters of proud kings the armed bands.
Then Juno with the whip was not remiss,
And of itself flew open heaven-gate,
Though to the Seasons, Jove the power gave
Hobbes1839: 695Alone to judge of early and of late.
And out the Goddesses their horses drave.
Jove on the highest of Olympus tops,
Sitting alone they found, and none him nigh.
The Goddess Juno there her horses stops,
Hobbes1839: 700And spake unto him thus, his mind to try:
Pray tell me, Jove, if you contented be,
That Mars thus raging in the field remain;
For what unseemly work he makes, you see,
And of brave Greeks how many he has slain,
[63]
Hobbes1839: 705While Venus at my grief stands laughing by,
And pleased is Apollo with the sight,
And set him on. But I could make him fly
(But that I fear your anger) from the fight.
Do’t then, said Jove; not you, but Pallas; she
Hobbes1839: 710Accustom’d is to vex him more than you.
Juno took this commission willingly.
Feeling the whip, away her horses flew,
’Twixt heaven and earth, and went at every strain
As far as coming one can see a ship,
Hobbes1839: 715That from a hill looketh upon the main,
So far the horses of the Gods can skip.
Arriv’d at Troy, on ground they set their feet,
And Juno there her heavenly steeds untied,
Where Simois doth with Scamander meet.
Hobbes1839: 720And with ambrosia, Simois them supplied.
Then swift as doves, to give the Argives aid,
They went to where they saw the greatest throng.
There was Tydides, and about him stayed
Many as lions valiant and strong.
Hobbes1839: 725And Juno there in shape of Stentor stood,
And spake as loud as any fifty men.
Argives, said she, cowards, for nothing good,
Although you make a goodly show. For when
Achilles went before you to the fight,
Hobbes1839: 730Out at their gates the Trojans durst not peep,
So much they of his spear abhorr’d the sight,
But from your ships you scarce now can them keep.
When Juno thus the Greeks encouraged,
To Diomed went Pallas; whom she found
Hobbes1839: 735Hard by his horses sitting, wearied.
And cooling in the open air the wound
Given by Pandarus; which with the sweat
Under his belt afflicted him the more;
And lifting up his belt some ease to get,
Hobbes1839: 740He from the wound was wiping off the gore.
As at the yoke Athena leaning stood,
Like him, said she, your father left no son;
A little man was he, but warrior good.
Though I not bade him, he went boldly on.
Hobbes1839: 745And when to Thebes alone I bade him go
Ambassador, and with the Theban lords
To sit at feast, and not provoke the foe,
And at their table to forbear harsh words,
Yet he his native courage still retained,
Hobbes1839: 750And them defied at manly exercises,
And from them all the victory he gained,
And won, by my assistance, all the prizes.
But when I you, as I did him, defend,
And bid you boldly with the Trojans fight,
[64]
Hobbes1839: 755You are afraid, or weariness pretend.
Of Tydeus sure the son you are not right.
Tydides to her then replying said,
Daughter of Jove, Pallas I know you are,
’Tis not that I am weary or afraid,
Hobbes1839: 760That I stand here abstaining from the war,
But in obedience to your own command,
Who gave me leave, if Venus in the wars
I met, to wound her; but not lift my hand
’Gainst other Gods. Now in the field is Mars,
Hobbes1839: 765And domineering fights on Hector’s side;
And that’s the cause why I from fight abstain,
And others by my counsel here abide.
To this the Goddess then replied again,
Nor Mars nor any of th’ Immortals spare,
Hobbes1839: 770That shall advance against you in the field.
And for your safety trust unto my care,
And know you are protected by my shield.
But first to Mars drive up your horses close,
And strike the blockhead with your spear in hand,
Hobbes1839: 775That fights sometimes for these, sometimes for those,
And with the Trojans now you see him stand,
And yet to help the Greeks he promis’d me
And Juno, but a little while before,
And now amongst the Trojans fighteth he,
Hobbes1839: 780And thinks upon his promises no more.
This said, they mount into the chariot,
And Sthenelus descending left his seat.
The axle-tree groaned under them. Why not?
A great man he, she was a Goddess great.
Hobbes1839: 785And then to Mars directly they drive on,
Who had but newly slain great Periphas,
Of old Ochesius the valiant son,
And far the best of all th’ Ætolians was.
Athena then puts Pluto’s helmet on,
Hobbes1839: 790Lest she by Mars should be discovered.
When Mars there saw Tydides all alone,
He Periphas forsook, who there lay dead;
And turn’d to meet Tydides on the way;
And when to one another they were near,
Hobbes1839: 795Mars making full account the man to slay,
Over the yoke thrusts at him with his spear.
But Pallas with her hand the point suppress’d,
And made it light beneath the seat in vain.
Tydides then to Mars a spear address’d,
Hobbes1839: 800Which had he been a mortal had him slain;
For Pallas in his belly stuck the spear,
And presently the same pluck’d out again.
Mars roar’d as loud as if in battle there
Fighting had been nine or ten thousand men,
[65]
Hobbes1839: 805And frighted both the armies with the noise.
Then like a black cloud which some wind makes rise,
He left th’ unlucky field and went his ways,
And in a little time was in the skies.
And sitting down hard by his father’s throne,
Hobbes1839: 810Shew’d him the blood that from the wound did flow,
And grievously lamenting made his moan.
Father, said he, do you such work allow?
That we the Gods such harm from mortals take,
While some for Trojans, some for Argives fight,
Hobbes1839: 815And partial be for one another’s sake,
The fault is to be laid on you by right.
For you brought forth this mad, pernicious maid,
Whose study is her malice to effect,
When by us other Gods you are obey’d;
Hobbes1839: 820And this you saw, but never would correct.
’Twas she that on the Gods set Diomed,
Who wounded Venus first, then flew at me.
And there in pain I lain had ’mongst the dead,
Or crippled been, had not my feet been free.
Hobbes1839: 825Uncertain Mars, then Jupiter replied,
Of all the Gods most hateful to my sight,
That quarrel lov’st to make, but not decide;
Thou hast thy mother Juno’s nature right,
That oft provokes me with her peevish tongue,
Hobbes1839: 830And by her order, I think, this was done.
But in this pain I’ll not detain you long,
Seeing you are as well mine as her son.
But had another got you, you had sure
To Pluto and th’ infernal Gods been sent.
Hobbes1839: 835This said, to Pæon he commits his cure;
And Pæon presently about it went.
As quickly as the milk is turn’d to curd,
When with a proper rennet it is mix’d,
And with a housewife’s hand together stirr’d,
Hobbes1839: 840So quickly was the wide wound clos’d and fix’d.
Then bath’d he was by Hebe, and new clad;
And that he so came off was well content.
Juno and Pallas when they driven had
Mars from th’ battle, up t’ Olympus went.
[66]

LIB. VI.

The first battle yet continued. The other Gods forbidden by Jove to assist.
The Gods to neither side assistance yield,
But on his own hand each man’s fortune lies;
Now here, now there, they skirmish in the field,
Betwixt the streams Xanthus and Simseis.
Hobbes1839: 5And first great Ajax killed Acamas,
And for his fellows opened a door
For slaughter ’mongst the files and ranks to pass,
And caus’d thereby the loss of many more.
And by Tydides Axylus was slain,
Hobbes1839: 10That at Arisbe dwelt near the highway,
Rich, and the Greeks did often entertain;
But none of them would save him in the fray,
For slain he was by Diomedes there,
Together with his squire, Calesius,
Hobbes1839: 15That by him sat, and was his charioteer.
Euryalus then slew Opheltius
And Dresus. After Pedasus he runs,
And Æsepus, sons of Bucalion,
Who by Abarbarea had two sons,
Hobbes1839: 20But he for father had Laomedon,
And th’ eldest was, but not in wedlock got;
And twins the sons were of Bucalion.
But from Euryalus they ’scaped not,
Nor long they lay there with their armour on.
Hobbes1839: 25Then Polypœtes by Astyalus,
Pidytes by Ulysses, and by Teuc-
er Areton, and by Antilochus
Ablerus; by Atrides Eleteus
Was slain, that the Pedasians led
Hobbes1839: 30From the delightful bank of Satnius.
And Leitus Philacus slew as he fled.
Eurypylus then slew Melanthius;
And then Adrestus taken was alive
By Menelaus. For his horses frighted,
Hobbes1839: 35Whilst to the town they labour’d to arrive,
Upon two branches of a tree they lighted,
And brake the char’ot pole off at the head.
The horses loose away ran tow’rd the town,
As did the rest that from the battle fled.
Hobbes1839: 40Adrestus headlong from the seat fell down,
And by him with a spear Atrides stood.
Adrestus then lays hold upon his knee.
Save me, said he, my ransom will be good,
At any rate I shall redeemed be.
[67]
Hobbes1839: 45My father wants nor iron, nor brass, nor gold,
And any thing to set me free will give,
When he of my condition shall be told,
And that I am your prisoner and live.
This said, Atrides was thereto inclin’d,
Hobbes1839: 50And ready for to send him to the ships.
But Agamemnon came and chang’d his mind
Before he had confirm’d it with his lips.
Brother, said he, what makes you be so kind
To any of these men? Is it because
Hobbes1839: 55You did at home the Trojans faithful find,
And that they had well served Menelaus?
No, no, we must no quarter give at Troy,
Nor spare the child yet in his mother’s womb,
But utterly the nation destroy,
Hobbes1839: 60And pluck up by the root proud Ilium.
Then Menelaus pitied him no more,
But violently push’d him from his knee,
Wherewith he backward tumbled o’er and o’er,
And soon by Agamemnon slain was he.
Hobbes1839: 65Then Nestor to the Greeks, with voice as high
As he could raise it, cried out, Let none
Yet on the spoil and booty set his eye,
But follow killing now, plunder anon:
The dead will stay till back again we come.
Hobbes1839: 70The Greeks by Nestor thus encouraged,
Had chas’d the Trojans unto Ilium,
But that by Helenus was hindered.
For standing near to Hector and Æneas,
Since all the work, said he, lies on your hand,
Hobbes1839: 75And you in fight and counsel chiefly please
Both Lycians and Trojans, make them stand;
About them go, and put yourselves between
The gates and them, lest followed by the foe
They should be by their loving wives there seen,
Hobbes1839: 80And the Argives stand triumphing in our woe.
And when you once have them encouraged,
Æneas and myself will with them stay,
And fight against the Greeks, though wearied.
But Hector to the town go you away,
Hobbes1839: 85And bid your and my mother take with her
The eldest Trojan matrons, and make haste
To Pallas’ temple, and present her there
With the best robe she has; and having plac’d
It on her knee, vow to her deity
Hobbes1839: 90(If she protect our wives and children will,
And city from this raging enemy,
And take off Diomed) that you will kill
Twelve heifers at her altar. For in fight
He has the great Achilles much outdone,
[68]
Hobbes1839: 95Who never did the Trojans thus affright,
Although they say he is a Goddess’ son.
Then Hector armed leapt down to the ground,
And with two spears about the army goes,
Courage inspiring to the Trojans round,
Hobbes1839: 100And straight they turn’d their faces to the foes.
The Greeks retiring then no longer fought.
Some God from heav’n descended was, they thought,
And t’ Hector and the Trojans aid had brought.
Then Hector to the Trojans cried out,
Hobbes1839: 105Trojans and aids, said he, be sure to stay
And play the men, whilst I to Ilium
Return, and cause them to the Gods to pray,
And to them sacrifice an hecatomb.
And as he walk’d, the edges of his shield
Hobbes1839: 110By turns his ankle and his neck did smite.
Tydides then, and Glaucus, on the field
Met one another, and prepar’d to fight.
Tydides speaking first, Brave man, said he,
Who are you? Let me know your name and race,
Hobbes1839: 115That dares so boldly thus advance on me.
I never yet in battle saw your face.
Men mortal to provoke me thus none dare,
But they whose parents are condemn’d to woe.
But if some God come down from heaven you are,
Hobbes1839: 120Do what you will I’ll not return a blow.
Licurgus, son of Dryas, chas’d the train
Of Bacchus with a goad at Nyssa, where
The Mænades threw from them on the plain
Their ivy-twined staves, and fled for fear;
Hobbes1839: 125Bacchus himself leapt into Thetis’ lap,
Trembling and frighted, and the Goddess kind
Receiv’d him, and defended from mishap.
But for this act Jove struck Licurgus blind,
Who died soon after. For the Gods above
Hobbes1839: 130All hated him. And that’s the cause that I
Dare not the anger of the Gods to move.
But if thou mortal art, come near and die.
O brave Tydides, Glaucus answer’d then,
To what end serves it you to know my race?
Hobbes1839: 135As with green leaves, so fareth it with men;
Some fall with wind, others grow in their place.
But since you ask me (though it be well known)
My pedigree at large I shall you tell.
Within a creek of Argos stands a town
Hobbes1839: 140Call’d Ephyre. There Sisyphus did dwell;
The subtle Sisyphus, who Glaucus got.
Glaucus, the father of Bellerophon,
Than whom a fairer person there was not,
Nor valianter in all the land not one.
[69]
Hobbes1839: 145But Prætus sought to take away his life;
For so enamour’d of him was the queen
Anteia, who of Prætus was the wife,
That she a suitor to him oft had been.
But still in vain; for he would not consent.
Hobbes1839: 150The fury of her love then turn’d to hate.
And spitefully she to her husband went,
And weeping bitterly, down by him sate,
And to him said, O king, resolve to die
Yourself, or else Bellerophon to kill,
Hobbes1839: 155For he attempted has my chastity,
And would have lain with me against my will.
The king incens’d, to kill him did intend,
But loth to do it there, he thought it better
Unto the King of Lycia him to send
Hobbes1839: 160(Who was Anteia’s father) with a letter,
Wherein he had declar’d his cruel mind,
And many ways to bring it to effect.
He, ignorant of what was then design’d,
The king’s commandement did not neglect.
Hobbes1839: 165To Lycia he went, and coming thither,
In favour with the Gods, was honoured
And treated like a God, nine days together.
O’ th’ tenth his letter he delivered.
The letter read, the king him first employ’d
Hobbes1839: 170The terrible Chimæra to assail,
That by the monster he might be destroy’d.
A lion’s head it had and dragon’s tail,
And in the midst the body of a goat;
A flame of burning fire was its breath.
Hobbes1839: 175Bellerophon with this foul monster fought,
And put it (by the aid o’ th’ Gods) to death.
The next adventure that he set him on,
Was th’ expedition ’gainst the Solymi.
The third when from the Amazons he won
Hobbes1839: 180(Those martial females) a great victory.
And as he came from thence the king had laid
An ambush for him on the way in vain,
Of choicest Lycians, whom he destroy’d,
That not a man of them return’d again.
Hobbes1839: 185The king receiv’d him then, believing now
That he descended was of heavenly race,
And gave him half his pow’r, and land enough,
And with his daughter’s marriage did him grace.
Bellerophon by her had children three;
Hobbes1839: 190Two sons, Isandrus and Hippolochus,
And one fair daughter, call’d Laodamie,
On whom by Jove Sarpedon gotten was.
Her father, by the Gods forsaken, then
Liv’d up and down in the Alean plain,
[70]
Hobbes1839: 195And shunn’d the conversation of men.
At Solym battle was Isander slain.
But of Hippolochus the son am I,
And he of noble ancestors descended.
To Troy he sent me, and especially
Hobbes1839: 200Unto me th’ honour of my race commended,
Than which in Ephyre none nobler is,
Nor in the land of Lycia more renown’d.
And Diomedes, joyful to hear this,
Turn’d his spear’s point and stuck it in the ground,
Hobbes1839: 205And to him kindly spake. There is, said he,
Between your ancestors and mine of old,
A mutual bond of hospitality.
Bellerophon, as I have oft been told,
Was by my grandsire, Œneus, freely treated,
Hobbes1839: 210And stayed with him twenty days and nights,
And when again he from his house retreated,
They tokens gave of hospitable rights;
Œneus to him a belt most glorious,
Bellerophon to him a golden cup,
Hobbes1839: 215Which I not with me brought, but in my house
When I came thence I safely left lock’d up.
My father I remember not. For he
Left me too young when last he went from home.
Henceforth my guest in Argos you must be,
Hobbes1839: 220I yours in Lycia, when I thither come.
Meantime, let’s one another’s spear decline;
For many Trojans more I have to kill,
Unless I cross’d be by some pow’r divine.
And of the Achæans kill you whom you will.
Hobbes1839: 225And that our friendship may the more appear,
I will present you with these arms of mine;
And you to me present the arms you wear.
This said, they lighted and their hands did join.
But Glaucus surely here bewitched was,
Hobbes1839: 230Or cursed by the Gods, that had forgot
His arms were gold, and Diomed’s but brass.
An hundred his, nine beeves the other bought.
Hector was now come to the Scæan gates;
To him the Trojan wives and daughters run
Hobbes1839: 235To ask their husbands’ and their brothers’ fates,
But to those questions he answer’d none.
But to the temples bade them go and pray;
Inquire no more for what you will lament;
Then to the royal palace went his way.
Hobbes1839: 240For great the danger was and imminent.
On every side within were galleries
Magnificent, of square well-plained stones,
With fifty lodgings for the families
(One by another) of King Priam’s sons;
[71]
Hobbes1839: 245And for his daughters twelve apartments were
(In the same court, but on the other side)
To lodge his sons-in-law when they were there,
Of the same stone in like form beautified.
Here Hecuba, as she conducted home
Hobbes1839: 250Laodice, her beautifulest daughter,
Met her son Hector that was newly come
In dusty bloody armour from the slaughter.
And took him by the hand, and to him said,
Why come you from the fight? Have we the worst,
Hobbes1839: 255And you come to solicit Jove for aid,
And after that is done to quench your thirst?
A little wine will much the strength sustain
Of one that labour’d has as you have done.
No, no, from wine (said he) I must abstain,
Hobbes1839: 260Lest I forget and leave my work undone.
Besides, to Jove I dare not offer wine
With bloody hands, lest I should him incense.
But, mother, go you to Minerva’s shrine
With other ladies, and with frankincense;
Hobbes1839: 265And of the robes in your perfumed chest
Take with you that which in your judgment is
Amongst them all the largest and the best,
And lay it down upon the Goddess’ knees.
And vow that at her altar you will kill
Hobbes1839: 270Twelve yearling heifers of the best you have,
If at your prayer condescend she will
Your children with yourselves and Troy to save,
And from the fight this Diomed remove.
To th’ temple presently go you away.
Hobbes1839: 275But I to Paris now must go, and prove
If he th’ advice I give him will obey.
Then Hecuba into the chamber came
Where many divers-colour’d vestures lay,
The work of many a Sidonian dame,
Hobbes1839: 280Which then from Sidon Paris brought to Troy,
When thither he from Sparta Helen brought.
Of these, to give the Goddess, she took one
The largest and most curiously wrought,
And that like to a star in heaven shone.
Hobbes1839: 285And when unto the temple come they were,
Theano opened the door; for she
(Antenor’s wife) was Pallas’ priest. And there
She took the robe, and laid it on her knee.
Then prayed she (whilst with a mighty cry
Hobbes1839: 290They to the Goddess lifted up their hands.)
Pallas, said she, daughter of Jove most high,
In whose protection ev’ry city stands,
Great Pallas, break the spear of Diomed,
And overthrow him at the Scæan gate,
[72]
Hobbes1839: 295That at thy altar may be offered
Twelve yearling heifers; and commiserate
The wives and children and the state of Troy.
Thus prayed they; but Pallas would not hear.
To th’ house of Paris Hector went away
Hobbes1839: 300That was unto his own and Priam’s near,
Built by himself the citadel within,
With all the art the Trojans understood.
There Hector with his spear in hand went in,
That was in length eleven cubits good,
Hobbes1839: 305And pointed at the head with polish’d brass,
Fasten’d into the staff with a gold ring.
Busy about his armour Paris was,
And Helen work to th’ maids distributing.
Here Hector Paris chid. Is this, said he,
Hobbes1839: 310The fittest time to manifest your spite
Against the Trojans, when the enemy
Under our walls is killing them in fight?
When none but you the cause is of the war
And tumult, which surrounds the town of Troy.
Hobbes1839: 315I think it would become you better far
To rate those men that from the battle stay.
Brother, said Paris, what you say is right.
But hear me, too. I stayed not behind
Because I to the Trojans bear a spite,
Hobbes1839: 320But from their slanders to avert my mind.
And now my wife too has persuaded me,
Who of myself was ready to begone.
Not sure to any side is victory.
Stay only while I put my armour on.
Hobbes1839: 325Or go. I’ll follow you and find you out.
Thus he. But Hector to it nothing said.
And to begone his face he turn’d about,
But Helen saw about to speak, and stayed.
Brother, said she, though I unworthy am
Hobbes1839: 330To call you so, I would I had been thrown
Into the sea the same day that I came
Into the world, so many shames to own.
Or that this husband sensible had been,
As men of honour should be of ill-fame;
Hobbes1839: 335But that’s not now, nor ever will be seen,
He one day will, I fear, repent the same.
But brother, pra’ ye, sit down and rest awhile,
That with the toil of battle weary are;
The cause whereof am I the woman vile,
Hobbes1839: 340That with me brought to Troy this cruel war.
Unlucky day that brought me first acquainted
With Alexander to our infamy,
Which through the world hereafter will be chaunted,
And make us loathsome to posterity.
[73]
Hobbes1839: 345Helen, said Hector, now I cannot stay,
The Trojans of my presence stand in need;
But bid you Alexander come away,
While I am in the town, and that with speed.
For hence unto my house I must go home
Hobbes1839: 350To see my wife, my child, and family,
And ’t may be never back again shall come,
But by the hands of the Achæans die.
This said, home Hector went, and there was told
His wife Andromache at home was not.
Hobbes1839: 355For with the nurse the battle to behold,
Into the tow’r on Scæa gate was got.
Then Hector of the women ask’d again,
Is she gone to some sister or some brother?
Or to the Goddess temple in the train
Hobbes1839: 360Of those that thither waited on my mother?
To this one of the women said again,
She neither went to sister nor to brother,
Nor to the Goddess’ temple, in the train
Of those that thither waited on your mother.
Hobbes1839: 365But when I know not who inform’d her had
That th’ Argives did the Trojans overpower,
With her young son and nurse as one that’s mad
Ran to the gate, and up into the tower.
Then back went Hector passing the same streets
Hobbes1839: 470Through which he went when he came from the fight,
Where in the way Andromache he meets
That now was running home in great affright.
The daughter she was of Eetion,
Who of Cilicia the sceptre carried,
Hobbes1839: 375And dwelt at Thebe in Hypoplacion,
But unto noble Hector she was married.
Now Hector met her with their little boy
That in the nurse’s arms was carried,
And like a star upon her bosom lay
Hobbes1839: 380His beautiful and shining golden head.
Scamandrius he called was by Hector,
Astyanax he named was in Troy.
Because his father was their sole protector,
The people from his honour nam’d the boy.
Hobbes1839: 385Then Hector smiling look’d upon his son.
And to him weeping said Andromache,
My dear, you’ll by your courage be undone,
And this your son a wretched orphan be.
The Greeks at once on you alone will fall,
Hobbes1839: 390And then a woeful widow shall be I,
And have no comfort in the world at all,
But live in misery and wish to die.
Father or mother they have left me none,
For by the great Achilles he was slain
[74]
Hobbes1839: 395When he the goodly town of Thebe won.
But from disarming him he did refrain.
Together with his arms he did him burn,
And with such rites as did a prince become.
And having put his ashes in an urn
Hobbes1839: 400Buried the same, and o’er it rais’d a tomb.
The mountain-nymphs, daughters of Jupiter,
Planted about it many elmen-trees.
My seven brothers all were killed there.
In one day by Achilles slain were these,
Hobbes1839: 405As they defending were their kine and sheep.
My mother with the booty he brought hither,
And her he at the ships did pris’ner keep
Until her friends her ransom had sent thither.
Then to her country back they sent my mother,
Hobbes1839: 410Who shortly after there fell sick and died.
Now Hector you my father are and brother,
Husband and mother. In you I confide.
For pity’s sake then on this turret stay,
Lest fatherless your son, I widow be;
Hobbes1839: 415And set your armed people in array,
And those that aid you at the syc’more-tree,
Where to the city easiest is th’ access.
For there it was the Argives thrice fell on
Led by Idomeneus, and th’ Ajaxes,
Hobbes1839: 420The two Atrides, and Tydeus’ son.
Whether they had some God for their director,
Or had observ’d some weakness in the place,
I know not. And to this replied Hector,
Dear wife, this might be done. But what disgrace
Hobbes1839: 425Shall I be in? How will the Trojans scoff,
Both men and women, and deride my fear,
If on the tow’r they saw me standing off
When others fighting with the Argives were?
Besides, by nature I am framed so,
Hobbes1839: 430I am not able to abstain from fight,
But must be ’mongst the foremost, when the foe
Invades my father’s honour in my sight.
And yet I know the evil day will come,
That Priam and his people perish must,
Hobbes1839: 435And utterly destroy’d be Ilium,
And all her stately buildings lie in dust.
Yet am not griev’d so much to think upon
The fate of Troy, of Priam, of my mother,
Or all my brothers, as for you alone
Hobbes1839: 440When by a proud Achæan one or other
You dragg’d are weeping into slavery,
And when t’ Achæa he has brought you home,
To fetch in water you employ’d shall be,
And made to labour at another’s loom.
[75]
Hobbes1839: 445And one that sees you weeping, there will say,
This woman was the noble Hector’s bride,
The bravest man of all that fought for Troy,
And of your tears bring back again the tide.
But dead may I be first and buried
Hobbes1839: 450Before I see you dragg’d or hear you cry.
And when he thus had said, his arms he spread
The childto take, who terrified thereby,
And unacquainted with a glittering crest
And horse’s mane that nodding at it hung,
Hobbes1839: 455Turn’d his face crying to the nurse’s breast,
And with his little arms close to her clung;
Which made his father and his mother smile.
Then Hector on the ground his helmet laid,
And took the child, and dandled him awhile,
Hobbes1839: 460And then to Jove and all the Gods he pray’d.
O Jove and Gods, grant that this son of mine
No less in Troy may honour’d be than I,
Nor from his father’s virtue e’er decline,
But hold the reins of Ilium steadily,
Hobbes1839: 465That men may say when he hath slain his foe,
And bringeth with him home his spoil to Troy,
In battle he his father doth outdo,
And fill his loving mother’s heart with joy.
This said, he gave the child t’ Andromache,
Hobbes1839: 470Which she receiving hugg’d, and laugh’d, and cried.
Which Hector with compassion did see,
And thus with gentle words his wife did chide.
Dear wife, do not afflict yourself for me.
No man can die before his hour is come;
Hobbes1839: 475And when ’tis come, put off it cannot be
By weak nor strong. Therefore I pray go home,
And tend your work, and give your women theirs,
And sit still at your spindle and your loom,
And leave to men these martial affairs,
Hobbes1839: 480And me that have the charge of Ilium.
Then up he takes his helmet and departs,
And homewards she; but often turn’d her head.
At home with grief she fill’d her women’s hearts,
And made them mourn for Hector not yet dead.
Hobbes1839: 485Nor Paris at his house did longer stay
Than he must needs his armour to put on,
And up and down the streets went ev’ry way,
To see if he could Hector light upon.
As when a horse i’ th’ stable pampered,
Hobbes1839: 490And used to be washed in the river
His headstall breaks, or be delivered
From that which held him by what means soever;
Then proudly he sets up his tail and head,
And beats the plain, and with the wind he makes
[76]
Hobbes1839: 495His mane play in the air dishevelled,
Then to the pasture known the way he takes:
So from his house went Paris through the streets
With shining arms, and courage at his heart;
And quickly with his valiant brother meets,
Hobbes1839: 500Turning from where he and his wife did part.
And first to Hector Paris thus began.
Brother, I fear I’ve made you stay too long.
No, he replied, your courage no man can
Accuse, but such as mean to do you wrong.
Hobbes1839: 505But when you, out of humour, will not fight,
The Trojans that much suffer for your sake
Speak all the ill they can of you in spite.
Which, when I hear, it makes my heart to ache.
But now let’s go. If e’er the powers divine
Hobbes1839: 510Displace the Achæan host, and give us peace,
That freely to them we may offer wine,
Your quarrel with the Trojans soon will cease.

LIB. VII.

The Greeks enclose their ships with a wall and ditch. The duel betwixt Hector and Ajax.
This said, they went together to the fight,
For Paris now no more the war declin’d,
And welcome to the Trojans was the sight,
As to a weary rower a good wind.
Hobbes1839: 5There Paris slew Menesthius, the son
Of the great clubman Areïthous
Of Arne. And by Hector overthrown
And struck clean through the neck was Eionus.
Iphinous, the son of Dexias,
Hobbes1839: 10As to his car he mounted to have fled,
By Glaucus through the shoulder wounded was,
And to the ground again fell backward dead.
When Pallas saw the Argives fall so fast,
She from Olympus leaped to Ilium:
Hobbes1839: 15Apollo then to meet her made great haste,
That saw her from his tow’r in Pergamum.
And when they were together at the beach,
He for the Trojans, for the Argives she,
Apollo to her thus address’d his speech:
Hobbes1839: 20Daughter of Jove, what great necessity
Brought you to Troy? Was it to please your mind,
Or give unto the Greeks the victory?
For well I know to Troy you are not kind.
But for the present be advis’d by me.
[77]
Hobbes1839: 25Let th’ armies both give over fight to day,
And fight it out hereafter, till they know
What end the Fates assigned have to Troy,
Since you and Juno needs will have it so.
Your counsel’s good, said Pallas, and the same
Hobbes1839: 30I thought upon. But tell me how to do it.
For to that end I from Olympus came.
Tell me but how, and I’ll consent unto it.
Why then, said Phœbus, Hector I’ll excite
In duel all the Argives to defy;
Hobbes1839: 35And they some one will choose with him to fight,
And both the armies quietly stand by.
This counsel was by both agreed upon;
And known to Helenus by augury,
To Helenus, that was King Priam’s son.
Hobbes1839: 40And he to Hector did himself apply.
Hector, said he, will you do that which I,
That am your brother, shall advise you to?
Go to th’ Achæan army, and defy
The best of all the Argives; boldly go;
Hobbes1839: 45For in this combat you are not to die:
The Gods have told me so. Then never fear.
Then to the front came Hector joyfully,
With both his hands o’ th’ middle of his spear
To keep the Trojans back and make them stand;
Hobbes1839: 50And straight King Agamemnon seeing it,
Unto the Argives gave the like command.
Then on the ground both Greeks and Trojans sit.
Phœbus and Pallas flew up to the tree,
The high beech-tree that sacred was to Jove,
Hobbes1839: 55I’ th’ likeness of two vultures, thence to see
How the two armies looked from above.
As when a west wind ruffled has the main,
It black and horrid to the eye appears;
So look’d the Greeks and Trojans on the plain,
Hobbes1839: 60Grisly and dark with helmets, shields, and spears.
Into the midst between them Hector stept.
You, Trojans and well-armed Greeks, said he,
Since ’twas Jove’s will our oath should not be kept,
But that the war continued shall be
Hobbes1839: 65Till either you shall win the town of Troy,
Or we your army and your ships confound,
Fighting till one another we destroy;
I to you, Argives, somewhat will propound.
The best of all the Greeks are present here.
Hobbes1839: 70Let one of them come forth and fight with me,
On these conditions (witness Jupiter)
If by his hand I slain in combat be,
Let him do with my armour what he will,
But send my body into Ilium.
[78]
Hobbes1839: 75But if Apollo grant me him to kill,
His armour I will have and carry home,
And in Apollo’s temple dedicate.
His body to the ships shall rendered be,
That on his urn the Greeks may elevate
Hobbes1839: 80A mount of earth for passengers to see
Upon the shore of Hellespont, and say,
Here lies a valiant Greek by Hector slain
Long since, when th’ Argives were besieging Troy.
My honour thus for ever will remain.
Hobbes1839: 85So Hector said. The Greeks all silent were.
For shame the challenge they could not refuse;
And to accept it ev’ry one did fear.
But Menelaus then his valour shews,
And rising up in anger, thus he said,
Hobbes1839: 90Women of Argos, what a shame is this,
That you should all of Hector be afraid!
What now become of all your threat’ning is?
There (dust and water, heartless, nameless), sit.
Myself I’ll arm (for I perceive no odds)
Hobbes1839: 95And will this sturdy champion Hector meet.
For victory comes only from the Gods.
This said, he rose and arm’d himself; and there
Depriv’d of life had Menelaus been
(So much too weak he was) by Hector’s spear,
Hobbes1839: 100But that the princes starting up came in.
And Agamemnon seizing on his hand,
Why, Menelaus, are you mad, said he,
In fight you cannot against Hector stand,
How much soever you concerned be.
Hobbes1839: 105Avoid him in the field as others do.
Achilles, who than you much stronger is,
Strong as he is, considers Hector too,
And cooler grows as oft as he him sees.
Therefore, good brother, sit still at your troop.
Hobbes1839: 110Some other we’ll oppose to Hector’s might,
That, haughty as he is, shall make him stoop,
And thank the Gods if safe he come from fight.
To this good counsel yielded Menelaus.
Whereat his servants not a little joy’d,
Hobbes1839: 115Came in, and soon by them unarm’d he was,
And to the Greeks then Nestor rose, and said,
O how unwelcome will this story be
To Greece, and Peleus king o’ th’ Myrmidons,
Who at his house the names enquir’d of me
Hobbes1839: 120Both of yourselves, your fathers, and your sons;
If he should know how much you Hector dread,
How oft would he hold up his hands, and pray
The Gods to send him down amongst the dead,
And from his body take all sense away!
[79]
Hobbes1839: 125O that I were as young as I was then
When war was ’twixt Arcadia and Pyle,
And at the walls of Pheia stood the men
Ready for bloody fight in rank and file!
Amongst them stood one Ereuthalion,
Hobbes1839: 130And of the great man Areïthous
Upon his shoulders had the armour on,
Who Clubman commonly surnamed was,
Because he used neither bow nor spear,
But with an iron club the battles brake.
Hobbes1839: 135Lycurgus slew him though he weaker were,
(When at advantage great he did him take)
By craft, not strength. For in a narrow way
He watch’d him at a turning with his spear,
And on a sudden took his life away,
Hobbes1839: 140So that the club had nothing to do there.
Then took he off his arms, and wore the same
In battle when there was occasion,
But gave them, when old age upon him came,
To this his squire Ereuthalion.
Hobbes1839: 145Who wearing them our army did defy,
At which, when others trembling stood and shook,
Although the youngest of them all was I,
Great as he was, the man I undertook,
And slew him by the Goddess Pallas’ aid,
Hobbes1839: 150The strongest and tallest that I e’er slew,
As when upon the ground he stretch’d was laid,
The place he covered did plainly show.
If I were now as young and strong as then,
The Greeks for Hector soon a match should find,
Hobbes1839: 155Though none of you that are their bravest men
To try your fortune with him have a mind.
Thus Nestor th’ Argive lords did reprehend,
And nine of them in number (all that durst
In single fight with Hector to contend)
Hobbes1839: 160Armed, and Agamemnon was the first.
And next the strong and valiant Diomed,
And then the greater Ajax, then the less,
Then King Idomeneus, of Crete the head,
And with him his good squire Meriones,
Hobbes1839: 165Who as the God of battle valiant was,
Besides Eurypylus Euæmon’s son,
And of Andremon the stout son Thoas,
And wise Ulysses last of all made one.
So many Greeks durst Hector undertake.
Hobbes1839: 170Bring in your lots, said Nestor then, and we
Will in a helmet them together shake.
And who by lot our champion shall be
Shall please us all, but please himself much more
When back again he cometh from the fight.
[80]
Hobbes1839: 175Then brought they in their lots; which o’er and o’er
He shook in Agamemnon’s helmet bright.
Meanwhile the people lift their hands, and pray,
O Jove, let now the lot to Ajax fall,
Or that on Diomedes light it may,
Hobbes1839: 180Or on Atrides our great general.
The helmet shaken threw out Ajax’ lot,
Which th’ herald took and carried about
To th’ Argive princes, but they own’d it not,
Till to the hand of Ajax it was brought,
Hobbes1839: 185Who sign’d it had, and into th’ helmet thrown.
He took it, and awhile consider’d it;
And when he was assured ’twas his own,
Rose up, and lets it fall before his feet.
And to the princes said, This lot is mine,
Hobbes1839: 190And glad I am, and hope for victory.
But send your pray’rs up to the pow’rs divine,
While I put on my arms; and silently,
So that, at least, the Trojans may not hear.
Or, now I think on’t, plain and openly.
Hobbes1839: 195For I see nothing that I need to fear.
I am not forc’d to fight unwillingly,
Nor rashly undertook the enterprise.
For I was born and bred in Salamis,
And hope I am not so weak or unwise.
Hobbes1839: 200As soon as mighty Ajax had said this,
The people looking up to heav’n pray’d.
O Jove, said one, grant Ajax victory,
Or if you be inclin’d Hector to aid,
Then let their strength and glory equal be.
Hobbes1839: 205When Ajax had his arms put on complete,
He walked away with a majestic pace,
As Mars goes to the war. His strides were great,
And scornful smiles with terror in his face.
And as he went he shook his mighty spear,
Hobbes1839: 210Which joyfully the Argives did behold;
But by the Trojans look’d on was with fear;
And Hector at the heart himself was cold,
But was ashamed back again to fly,
Since he provok’d him had into the field.
Hobbes1839: 215And Ajax now was come unto him nigh,
As from a tower, looking o’er his shield,
By Tychius of Hyla made it was,
And cover’d with sev’n fat bulls’ hides well tann’d,
And over them an eighth of shining brass,
Hobbes1839: 220And at his breast he held it with his hand,
And threat’ning said, Hector, I’ll make you see,
That in the army many yet remain,
Though from us angry gone Achilles be,
And discontent from battle now abstain,
[81]
Hobbes1839: 225That fear not Hector. Do the worst you can.
Ajax, said Hector, I am not a child,
Nor woman, to be threaten’d, but a man
That understands the bus’ness of the field,
And can my buckler bear from left to right,
Hobbes1839: 230And have whereon in battle to rely,
And know to guide my horses in a fight,
And move my feet to Mars his melody.
But no such cunning will I use with you,
My spear I’ll send unto you openly.
Hobbes1839: 235And at that word the long spear from him flew,
And pierc’d his target to the seventh ply.
But there it staid. Then Ajax threw his spear,
Which Hector’s shield, armour, and coat went thro’;
But Hector shrunk his belly in for fear,
Hobbes1839: 240For else it pierced had his belly too.
Then from their shields the spears they plucked out,
And them no more at one another threw,
But came unto each other close, and fought,
And like two lions on each other flew.
Hobbes1839: 245And Hector made a thrust at Ajax’ shield
Which enter’d not, resisted by the brass:
But Hector’s shield to Ajax’ spear did yield,
Which pierc’d it through, and so far in did pass,
That grazing on his neck it fetch’d the blood.
Hobbes1839: 250But Hector, not dismay’d, took up a stone.
Ajax took ’t on his shield and firmly stood,
And with his hand took up a greater one,
And rougher, which did Hector’s buckler tear,
And with the weight unto the ground him threw,
Hobbes1839: 255But up again Apollo did him rear.
Then both of them, the combat to renew,
Their swords were drawing. But the heralds then,
Idæus and Talthibius, came in,
The sacred messengers of Gods and men,
Hobbes1839: 260And put themselves the combatants between.
Troy’s herald then, Idæus, to them spake.
Good sons, belov’d of Jove, give over fight,
For all men of your valour notice take.
And now ’tis late; we must submit to night.
Hobbes1839: 265Idæus, then said Ajax, let these words
From Hector come, from whom came the defy.
’Twas he that challeng’d all the Argive lords.
Let him give over first, and then will I.
Then Hector spake. Ajax, since you, said he,
Hobbes1839: 270The Gods endued have with strength and wit,
Let for to-day the quarrel ended be.
Hereafter let the Gods determine it,
And give which side they please the victory,
For now ’tis late. To night we must submit;
[82]
Hobbes1839: 275That you the Greeks may cheer, and specially
Your own friends and companions, at your fleet:
And I the Trojans from their fear relieve,
And wives, that for my safe return do pray.
But come, let’s t’ one another tokens give,
Hobbes1839: 280That Greeks and Trojans seeing them may say,
These two men fought and sought each other’s death,
Yet parted friends. This said, he to him gave
His belt with his good sword and iv’ry sheath;
Ajax to him his shining girdle brave.
Hobbes1839: 285Thus parted, Ajax to the Argives went;
And Hector back into the troops of Troy;
Who mightily rejoic’d at the event
That past all hope they saw him come away.
The lords conducted him to Ilium:
Hobbes1839: 290The Greeks to Agamemnon Ajax led.
And when they all unto his tent were come,
He for them sacrific’d a bull well fed,
Which flay’d, divided, roasted, taken up,
The carvers into messes cut. This done,
Hobbes1839: 295King Agamemnon and the princes sup.
The chine at Ajax’ table was set on,
And when their thirst and hunger were subdu’d,
Nestor, whose counsel still had been the best,
What further was to be consider’d shew’d,
Hobbes1839: 300And to the princes all his speech address’d.
Atrides, and you other princes, know
How Mars with Argives strewed hath the plain,
And sent their souls down to the pow’rs below,
Whose bloody bodies in the field remain.
Hobbes1839: 305Tomorrow, therefore, let us cease from war,
And early in the morning fetch the dead,
And burn them somewhere from the ships not far,
That t’ Argos back they may be carried,
When we depart from hence; that their bones may
Hobbes1839: 310By their own friends and children buried be.
Let’s raise a mount upon the shore of Troy,
One for them all, for passengers to see,
And fortify our good ships with a wall,
And turrets in it, and a ditch without,
Hobbes1839: 315Lest unawares the Trojans on us fall,
And gates for char’ots to go in and out.
Meanwhile the Trojan lords at counsel were
Loud and discordant. Then Antenor said,
Trojans and aids, I pray to me give ear,
Hobbes1839: 320For of the worst I greatly am afraid.
Let Menelaus have his wife again,
And all the goods she brought with her. Take heed;
Against our oath we shall but fight in vain.
Then let her go, or never look to speed.
[83]
Hobbes1839: 325Antenor, then said Paris, this is not
The best advice you could have given, or
(If what you say dissent not from your thought)
You are not now so wise as heretofore:
Thus much to you. But to the Trojans this:
Hobbes1839: 330Her wealth I’ll render, with more of mine own,
But my wife Helen I will not dismiss.
And when he that had said, again sat down.
Then Priam rose. Trojans and aids, said he,
Now take your supper as you us’d to do,
Hobbes1839: 335And sentinels set, such as careful be;
To-morrow I will send Idæus to
The Greeks with Paris’ answer, and to try
If they from battle for so long will cease,
That we may burn our slain men quietly,
Hobbes1839: 340And fight again hereafter when they please.
This said, the Trojans to their suppers went.
Next morn Idæus found the Argive lords
Together met at Agamemnon’s tent,
And coming in, unto them said these words:
Hobbes1839: 345Atrides, and you Argives all, I come
With terms from Paris, and by Priam sent,
On which you may depart from Ilium,
And end the war, if thereto you consent.
The wealth which he with Helen brought ashore,
Hobbes1839: 350(I would before he brought it he had died)
To Menelaus he will give, and more;
But his wife Helen shall with him abide.
Besides, the people have commanded me
To ask you if you will the war suspend,
Hobbes1839: 355Until our dead fetch’d off and burned be,
And after fight till Jove the war shall end.
So said Idæus. The Greeks silent were
Awhile. At last Tydides rose and spake.
Let not the Greeks so much the Trojans fear
Hobbes1839: 360As Helen’s goods, or her herself to take
At Alexander’s hands. The hour is come
(As any child may manifestly see)
That must o’erthrow the state of Ilium.
So said Tydides, and much prais’d was he.
Hobbes1839: 365Then Agamemnon answer’d to Idæus,
You hear what the Argives say. I say the same.
As for the dead men, burn them if you please;
They’re good for nothing. I contented am.
And of this truce let Jove a witness be.
Hobbes1839: 370This said, to Jove his sceptre up he heav’d.
Idæus back to Troy went speedily,
The answer to relate he had receiv’d.
Meanwhile the states of Troy in council sat,
And there their herald’s coming back expected.
[84]
Hobbes1839: 375Idæus then went in, and told them that
The offer made by Paris was rejected,
But that a truce was granted for a day.
Next morn the Trojans, early as they could,
Went some to th’ field to fetch their dead away,
Hobbes1839: 380And others to the hill to fetch down wood.
So did the Argives some to Ida go
For wood, and others to the bloody field,
But could not then distinguish friend from foe.
But by and by the sun began to gild
Hobbes1839: 385Scamander’s plain; then wash’d they off the gore
And dust, and laid their dead men upon carts.
But Priam had forbidden them to roar,
Or cry outright, though grieved at their hearts.
When they had burnt them, back they went again.
Hobbes1839: 390The Greeks too, when they had consum’d with fire
And done their lamentation for the slain,
Unto their ships did back again retire.
But this th’ Achæans did at break of day,
And rais’d one mighty monument for all.
Hobbes1839: 395And the incursion of the foe to stay,
Their navy they inclosed with a wall,
With turrets high, and a great ditch without,
(Upon the sides whereof sharp pales they fix)
And gates for char’ots to go in and out.
Hobbes1839: 400And all the day thus toiling were the Greeks.
Meanwhile the Gods together sat above,
And wond’ring look’d upon this work of men;
And Neptune then address’d his speech to Jove.
What mortals will the Gods consult again?
Hobbes1839: 405See you not what a wall the Greeks have rear’d,
And what a ditch about it made, said he,
The fame whereof ’mongst people will be heard
As far as the sun-beams extended be?
Yet to the Gods they hecatomb gave none.
Hobbes1839: 410Whereas the walls that I and Phœbus rais’d
About the city for Laomedon,
Obscur’d by this, no longer will be prais’d.
Then answer’d Jove. Neptune, I never thought
That such a word would e’er have come from you,
Hobbes1839: 415That have the pow’r to bring their work to nought.
A lesser God might have complain’d, ’tis true;
But of your pow’r Aurora sees no bound.
Stay only till the Greeks be gone away;
Then break their wall, and throw it to the ground,
Hobbes1839: 420And hide the place with sand. Thus talked they.
The sun now set, and finish’d was the wall.
The Greeks went back then each man to his tent,
And many good fat beeves they made to fall;
And wine they had great store from Lemnos sent.
[85]
Hobbes1839: 425For ships abundance laden were come in,
Which by Euneus (th’ hero Jason’s son,
Got on Hypsiphile) thither sent had been,
For which the army barter’d. Hides gave one,
Another th’ ox itself, another brass;
Hobbes1839: 430One iron, and another gave a slave,
Beside what by Euneus given was
To the two Atrides of free gift to have.
When supper ready was they all sat down,
And all night long the feast continued,
Hobbes1839: 435Greeks in their tents, and Trojans in the town.
And all night long aloud Jove thundered,
Meaning no good to th’ Greeks. Then pour’d they on
The ground the offer’d wine, Jove to content,
And no man durst to drink till that was done.
And when they had well drunk to sleep they went.

LIB. VIII.
[edit]

The second battle; and the Trojans stay all night in the field.
The morning now was quite display’d, and Jove
Upon Olympus’ highest top was set:
And all the Gods and Goddesses above
By his command were there together met.
Hobbes1839: 5And Jupiter unto them speaking said,
You Gods all, and you Goddesses, d’ye hear,
Let none of you the Greeks or Trojans aid;
I cannot do my work for you. Forbear.
For whomsoever I assisting see
Hobbes1839: 10The Argives or the Trojans, be it known
He wounded shall return and laugh’d at be,
Or headlong into Tartarus be thrown,
Into the deepest pit of Tartarus,
Shut in with gates of brass, as much below
Hobbes1839: 15The common hell, as ’tis from hell to us.
But if you will my pow’r by trial know,
Put now into my hand a chain of gold,
And let one end thereof lie on the plain,
And all you Gods and Goddesses take hold;
Hobbes1839: 20You shall not move me howsoe’er you strain.
At th’ other end, if I my strength put to’t,
I’ll pull you Gods and Goddesses to me,
Do what you can, and earth and sea to boot,
And let you hang there till my pow’r you see.
[86]
Hobbes1839: 25The Gods were out of countenance at this,
And to such mighty words durst not reply,
Till Pallas said, Well known, O father, is
Your mighty pow’r. But do not us deny,
When we so many Argives falling see,
Hobbes1839: 30To show we have compassion, and grieve.
And though in fight we no assistants be,
Yet let us sometimes counsel to them give,
Lest in your anger they be all destroy’d.
Dear child, said Jove, it goes against my mind.
Hobbes1839: 35I would not have my orders disobey’d.
’Tis granted though. For I’ll to you be kind.
This said, he set his horses to his car,
Hard hoof’d, swift-footed horses two. Like gold
Their manes profound well-combed shined far.
Hobbes1839: 40Then arm’d himself, and on the whip laid hold.
No sooner had the horses felt the whip,
But up they start, and ’twixt the earth and sky
The winds themselves with swiftness they outstrip,
And came unto the top of Ida high
Hobbes1839: 45To Gargarus, and there Jove took them out,
And hiding them with air on th’ hill sat down;
And as he sat he cast his eyes about
With great content upon the fleet and town.
The Argives at their tents short breakfast make,
Hobbes1839: 50And arm’d themselves as soon as they had done.
The Trojans, for their wives’ and children’s sake,
(Though fewer) arm’d and made haste to be gone.
Then open’d were the gates, and to the field
Out came they horse and man; and being met,
Hobbes1839: 55They man to man came up with shield to shield,
And spear to spear; and on each other set.
Some groan’d, some vaunted, mighty was the din
Of those that kill, and those that falling cry.
And this condition they continued in
Hobbes1839: 60Until the sun had mounted half the sky.
Then Jove took up a pair of scales of gold,
And weigh’d the fates of both the nations,
And equally suspended them did hold;
But not so equal were their inclinations.
Hobbes1839: 65For th’ Argive scale sat still upon the ground,
While th’ other lifted was up to the skies.
Heaven and earth did then with thunder sound,
And Jove threw lightning in the Argives’ eyes,
Then all the Greeks amazed ran away.
Hobbes1839: 70Idomeneus and Agamemnon ran;
Nor either of the Ajaxes durst stay:
Except old Nestor they fled ev’ry man.
And Nestor too had fled, had he known how:
For of his horses Paris one had shot,
[87]
Hobbes1839: 75And pierc’d his forehead just above the brow
Into the brain, so that his chariot
Now useless was, and the horse troublesome.
Then cuts he th’ harness; but so long did stay,
That Hector now was almost to him come,
Hobbes1839: 80And th’ old man surely had been cast away,
But that Tydides saw him in this pain,
And terribly t’ Ulysses cried out,
Whether d’ye fly, Ulysses? Come again,
Help to defend old Nestor; face about.
Hobbes1839: 85While he said this, Ulysses still ran on,
Not minding what he said. And Diomed,
To succour Nestor, to him went alone,
And with him stood before his chariot’s head,
And said, O Nestor, youthful is the foe
Hobbes1839: 90That cometh on, and you now very old,
Your charioteer not strong, your horses slow,
Come up into my char’ot, and behold
My Trojan horses how well they can run
When there is cause t’approach or shun the fight;
Hobbes1839: 95From Venus’ son Æneas I them won,
A man of much experience in flight:
Send back your horses, and with mine we’ll go
And fight the Trojans. ’Twill not be amiss
To let the mighty champion Hector know,
Hobbes1839: 100A spear as mad is in my hand as his.
This said, both Sthen’lus and Eurymedon
With Nestor’s horses went to Nestor’s tent:
Nestor and Diomed, both mounted on
Tydides’ chariot, up to Hector went.
Hobbes1839: 105And when they were to one another near,
At Hector Diomedes threw in haste,
And miss’d of him, and kill’d his charioteer;
Clean through his breast the spear well driven pass’d;
Down dead he fell, but Hector lets him lie,
Hobbes1839: 110And turns aside to seek a charioteer,
The place of Heniopeus to supply.
And Archeptolemus then being near,
Call’d up by Hector, on the reins laid hold.
Then mighty work and slaughter there had been,
Hobbes1839: 115And Trojans shut like lambs within a fold
In Troy, but that it was by Jove foreseen;
For in a clap of thunder Jove down threw
His bolt at Diomedes’ horses’ feet,
And th’ earth with sulphur flaming looked blue.
Hobbes1839: 120Nestor himself astonish’d was to see’t;
Lets go the reins, and down the horses fell.
And Nestor then to Diomedes said,
’Tis Jove, you see, that doth our force repel,
And Hector, for this day, intends to aid.
[88]
Hobbes1839: 125Another day to us he will be kind,
If he see cause; for no man can him tie,
Nor able is to make him change his mind,
And therefore now our best course is to fly.
’Tis true, O Nestor, said Tydides then,
Hobbes1839: 130But what a pain then at my heart will lie,
When Hector, speaking to the Trojan men,
Shall brag he made Tydides from him fly?
Then should I wish the earth would swallow me.
Though Hector says so, Nestor then replied,
Hobbes1839: 135Believed by the Trojans ’twill not be,
So many of them by your hand have died.
And at this word his steeds he turn’d about.
A show’r of spears then from the Trojans flies,
Who them pursued with a mighty shout.
Hobbes1839: 140Then Hector loud unto Tydides cries,
Ho! Diomed, by th’ Argives honoured
Above the most, serv’d with a greater mess,
And higher seat, and wine unlimited,
You will hereafter be esteemed less.
Hobbes1839: 145Unmanly Diomed. Fly, baggage, fly;
You ne’er shall come within the walls of Troy,
To freight your ship with women here; for I
Intend to send you first another way.
This said, Tydides was awhile in doubt
Hobbes1839: 150Whether to turn or no and Hector meet,
And thrice to turn his horses was about,
And Jove thrice thund’ring turn’d them tow’rd the fleet,
Shewing that he the honour of that day
Had granted to the Trojans. Hector then
Hobbes1839: 155Pursu’d them close, and roaring all the way,
Trojans, said he, and aids, now play the men,
For sure I am that Jove is on our side,
And give us will the victory this day.
And fools they are that in their wall confide;
Hobbes1839: 160For through their trench our horse shall find a way.
When we are at the ships, let one or other
Have fire to burn them ready, and then fall
Upon the men confounded in the smother.
This said, he did upon his horses call,
Hobbes1839: 165Xanthus, Podargus, Æthon, Lampus, see
You pay now what you owe me for your meat,
Laid in your mangers by Andromache,
Who always served you with pleasant wheat,
And steep’d sometimes, when she thought fit, in wine;
Hobbes1839: 170And very oft, though I her husband be,
Your dinner was made ready before mine.
Now, now pursue the Argives lustily,
That Nestor’s shield of gold I may obtain;
Nor of Tydides’ armour must we fail,
[89]
Hobbes1839: 175By Vulcan wrought. If we but these can gain,
The Argives will this very night hoist sail.
At Hector’s speech Juno upon her throne
Unquiet sitting, made Olympus shake;
For mov’d she was with his presumption,
Hobbes1839: 180And looking upon Neptune to him spake.
Neptune, said she, are you not stirr’d at this?
You know at Ægæ, and at Helice,
Their liberality abundant is,
And sure I am you wish them victory.
Hobbes1839: 185What! cannot we, who with the Argives side,
If we our pow’rs together join in one,
Drive back the Trojans, and abate their pride,
And leave Jove here to sit and chafe alone?
Juno, said Neptune, griev’d, these words are bold:
Hobbes1839: 190I’ll not rebel; for we shall have the worst,
And so we have by Jupiter been told.
Thus Neptune and the wife of Jove discours’d.
And now between the walls and ships, the place
With horses and with armed men was fill’d,
Hobbes1839: 195And crammed were within a narrow space
By Hector, that was master of the field.
And had not Agamemnon been inspired
By Juno to put courage in his men,
The Argive ships had certainly been fired,
Hobbes1839: 200And never had the Greeks gone back again.
Then ’mongst the ships he went, and stayed at
Ulysses’ ship, which was the middlemost
Of all the navy, and the tallest; that
He might be heard to both ends of the host,
Hobbes1839: 205Both to Achilles and to Ajax’ tent,
Clad in th’ imperial robe, that all might see’t;
For these two being the most confident,
Had plac’d themselves at th’ utmost of the fleet;
And with a mighty voice to th’ Argives cried,
Hobbes1839: 210Disgrace of Greece, mere outsides, where are now
Your brags, that any of you durst abide
An hundred Trojans, and yet dare not show
A face to Hector, who our ships would fire?
But this was said at Lemnos in your wine,
Hobbes1839: 215Which rais’d your language than your nature higher;
But cooled now the battle you decline.
Was ever king afflicted as I am,
O Jove, or lost a victory so near?
And yet at all your altars as I came,
Hobbes1839: 220My sacrifices duly payed were,
In hope that I the town of Troy should sack.
But grant at least, O Jove, that we may come
Ourselves into Achæa safely back,
And not be here destroy’d at Ilium.
[90]
Hobbes1839: 225This said, Jove grants them safely to depart,
And from him presently his eagle came,
And brought the tender issue of a hart,
And near unto his altar dropp’d the same.
The Argives when they saw the bird of Jove,
Hobbes1839: 230Were to the fight again encouraged,
And who should first repass the trenches strove.
And he that first came forth was Diomed.
And much before that any of the rest
Had any slain, he killed Agelaus,
Hobbes1839: 235Whom with his spear he pierc’d from back to breast,
When from him he his char’ot turning was.
Then Agamemnon came, and Menelaus,
And then the greater Ajax, then the less.
The sixth the king Idomeneus was,
Hobbes1839: 240And with him came his squire Meriones.
And next Eurypylus, Euæmon’s son.
The ninth was Teucer with his bow unbent.
Hid with the shield of Ajax Telamon
His mighty brother, to the field he went,
Hobbes1839: 245Which Ajax lifting, Teucer chose his man,
And having at him aim’d, and shot, and kill’d,
As children to their mothers, back he ran,
And hid himself behind his brother’s shield.
How many were the men he killed thus?
Hobbes1839: 250Orstolochus, Ophlestus, Lycophon,
And Melanippus, Dætor, Ormenus,
And Chromius, and last Amopaon.
All those lay dead together on the sands.
When Agamemnon saw what work was done
Hobbes1839: 255By Teucer’s arrows on the Trojan’s bands,
He to him came, and said, O valiant son
Of Telamon, so, so your shafts bestow,
Unto the Argives all an honour be,
And to your father Telamon; for though
Hobbes1839: 260Unto your mother married not was he,
Yet has he still maintain’d you as his own.
And if it please Jove and the pow’rs divine
To make me once the master of this town,
Your share shall be the next set out to mine,
Hobbes1839: 265And to your honour shall receive from me
A tripod, and two horses with the car;
Or if you will, your bed shall honour’d be
With some fair woman taken in the war.
Teucer to this then answer made and said,
Hobbes1839: 270Of this encouragement no need have I.
Since we came forth I have no time delay’d,
But done as much as in my pow’r did lie.
Eight shafts already have gone from my bow,
And in as many Trojans fix’d have been.
[91]
Hobbes1839: 275Of this mad dog I miss I know not how.
Then took he out another arrow keen,
And aim’d at Hector, but he hit him not,
But wounded on the breast Gorgythion,
Who on fair Castianira was begot,
Hobbes1839: 280And of King Priam’s valiant sons was one.
Who falling on his knees hung down his head,
Just as a poppy charg’d with fruit and rain,
So had his casque his head o’erburthened.
And Teucer then at Hector shot again,
Hobbes1839: 285And miss’d again. Apollo put it by.
But Archeptolemus, his charioteer,
He missed not. Hector ’scap’d narrowly,
And Archeptolemus expired there
Shot through the breast. Hector was sorry, but
Hobbes1839: 290Left him. Cebriones chanc’d to be nigh,
And in his hands Hector the reins did put,
And from his chariot leap’d down suddenly,
And took a heavy stone into his hand.
Teucer the while again his bow had bent.
Hobbes1839: 295But drawing did so long, and aiming stand,
The stone from Hector the arrow did prevent,
And near the shoulder on the breast him struck.
And broken was the bow-string with the blow,
And his benumbed arm all sense forsook,
Hobbes1839: 300And sinking on his knees he dropped the bow.
Then Ajax stepp’d before him with his shield.
Mecistheus and Alastor him convey’d
Unto the Argive ships from off the field,
Grievously bruised, groaning and dismayed.
Hobbes1839: 305The courage of the Trojans now renew’d,
They chas’d the Argives back unto their wall,
And till the trenches they had pass’d, pursu’d,
And Hector at their heels the near’st of all.
As when a hound pursueth a wild boar,
Hobbes1839: 310Or lion, and presuming on his feet
Pinches his haunch or side, and then gives o’er,
Not daring if he turn the beast to meet;
So Hector chasing them still slew the last.
And many of them had the Trojans slain
Hobbes1839: 315Ere they the trenches and the pale had pass’d.
But being in they there themselves contain,
And comfort one another all they can;
And to the Gods and Goddesses they pray,
Lifting their hands to heaven every man;
Hobbes1839: 320And Hector then turn’d off and went his way.
Which Juno seeing, unto Pallas said,
Daughter of Jupiter, do you not see
What Greeks one madman, Hector, has destroy’d?
Shall we sit still in this extremity?
[92]
Hobbes1839: 325To Juno then Athena thus replied,
Had not my father’s wits been at a loss,
This furious Hector by the Greeks had died,
But he my counsel always loves to cross.
He has forgot how oft his son I sav’d
Hobbes1839: 330Oppressed by Euristheus’ tyranny.
For always when his father’s help he crav’d,
Down to the earth from heaven sent was I.
But had I known as much as I do now,
When for the dog he went to Pluto’s gate,
Hobbes1839: 335He had for me till this time staid below,
And by the odious Styx for ever sate.
But now he hates me. And by Thetis led,
He must Achilles honour. But my hope is,
The time will come I shall be favoured
Hobbes1839: 340By him again, and called his dear Glaucopis.
But make you ready now your chariot,
While I put on my arms; that we may see
If Hector will thereof be glad or not,
Or if some Trojans rather shall not be
Hobbes1839: 345Left dead for dogs and vultures to devour.
Then Juno to her car the horses brought.
To Jove’s house Pallas went, and on the floor
Threw down her long robe, and put on Jove’s coat.
And then her breast with armour covered.
Hobbes1839: 350And on her shoulder hung her fearful shield.
Then took her heavy spear with brazen head,
Wherewith she breaketh squadrons in the field.
Then open of itself flew heaven-gate,
(Though to the Seasons Jove the power gave
Hobbes1839: 355Alone to judge of early and of late)
And out the Goddesses the horses drave.
Then Jove to Iris said, Go, to them speak.
Tell them an ill match they will have of me.
I’ll lame their horses and their char’ot break,
Hobbes1839: 360Unto the ground they both shall tumbled be;
And with my thunder wounded shall be so,
That ten years after they shall not be well.
For I would have Glaucopis well to know
What ’tis against her father to rebel.
Hobbes1839: 365But Juno is so us’d to cross my will,
That towards her my anger is the less.
Then Iris went her way from Ida hill,
And near Olympus met the Goddesses,
And as she bidden was did to them speak.
Hobbes1839: 370What fury’s this? Whither d’ye go, said she.
Jove will your horses lame, your char’ot break,
And to the ground you both will tumbled be,
And with his thunder wounded will be so,
That ten years after you will not be well.
[93]
Hobbes1839: 375For you, Glaucopis, he will make to know
What ’tis against your father to rebel.
But Juno is so us’d to cross his will
That he affronts from her can better bear;
But, Pallas, at your hands he takes it ill
Hobbes1839: 380That you should dare against him lift a spear.
Iris, her errand done, no longer stay’d,
And to Minerva thus said Juno then:
Jove shall no more for me be disobey’d,
By taking part in war with mortal men.
Hobbes1839: 385But let one live and let another die,
As by the chance of war it shall fall out,
And let him do what he thinks equity.
This said, her chariot she turn’d about.
The horses by the Seasons freed and fed,
Hobbes1839: 390The char’ot was set up against the wall.
The Goddesses themselves then entered,
And took their places in the council-hall
With th’ other Gods. And Jove himself from Ida
T’ Olympus came, and lighted from his car,
Hobbes1839: 395And Neptune from the same his steeds untied,
And set them up, and of them had a care.
The chariot he set to the altar near
Cover’d with linen fine. Then to his throne,
His throne of gold, mounted the Thunderer,
Hobbes1839: 400And made Olympus shake as he sat down.
But Juno and Athena silent sat
Together by themselves from Jove apart
And discontent. But Jove knew well for what;
And answer made to what was in her heart.
Hobbes1839: 405Juno, said he, and Pallas, why so sad?
Your fight against the Trojans was not long.
And more you had been vexed if it had;
So much for th’ other Gods I am too strong.
The danger scarce begun was when you fled.
Hobbes1839: 410But had you dar’d the battle to maintain,
You had been by my hand so thundered,
You never had t’ Olympus come again.
Juno at this and Pallas grumbling sat,
And Pallas from replying did abstain,
Hobbes1839: 415Although no less the Trojans she did hate.
But Juno was not able to contain.
O cruel Jove, said she, what words are these?
Must we unto our friends be so ingrate,
Because we know you can do what you please,
Hobbes1839: 420As not the Argives to commiserate?
We are content, since you will have it so,
No longer in the war to give them aid;
But let us give them counsel what to do,
Lest in your anger they be all destroy’d.
[94]
Hobbes1839: 425Juno, said Jove, tomorrow you shall know
If you’ll be pleas’d the battle to behold,
How many martial Greeks I’ll overthrow.
For Hector shall not be by me control’d
Until Achilles be fetch’d back again,
Hobbes1839: 430And at the Argive ships the battle be
About the body of Patroclus slain.
For so it is ordain’d by destiny.
And for your anger, Juno, I not care,
Though to the end of earth and sea you go,
Hobbes1839: 435(Where pent Iäpetus and Saturn are
In horrid darkness) and complain; yet so
I will not for your anger care a jot.
For you are grown extremely insolent.
Thus Jupiter; and Juno answer’d not.
Hobbes1839: 440Then down the sun into the ocean went,
Drawing upon the fields a cloudy night,
Which gave the Trojan army no content,
But to the Greeks more welcome was than light.
The army Hector call’d to parliament,
Hobbes1839: 445And led them to a clean place, free from blood,
And there they all on foot about him throng.
Hector unto them giving orders stood
With spear in hand eleven cubits long.
Hear me, you Trojans and you aids, said he,
Hobbes1839: 450I thought we should have now the Greeks destroy’d,
And lodged in the town with victory.
But this my hope is by the night made void,
Nor can we help it. Let us now provide,
For supper, beeves and sheep, and wine and bread
Hobbes1839: 455From Troy; and let the horses be untied,
And care be taken that they be well fed.
Then fetch in wood, and fires abundance make,
That with the flame light’ned may be the sky,
Lest th’ Argives in the dark advantage take,
Hobbes1839: 460To go aboard and safe to Argos fly.
Let them embark at least in haste, and bear
Along with them their wounds uncured home,
That others who shall see’t may stand in fear,
And say, This ’tis to fight ’gainst Ilium.
Hobbes1839: 465And let great boys and old men all night wake
Upon the walls and tow’rs, and guards be set,
And every wife at home a great fire make,
Lest into Troy the foe by treason get.
This, valiant Trojans, let be done to-night,
Hobbes1839: 470To morrow I shall further order give.
I doubt not but to put these dogs to flight
By th’ help of Jove, and Ilium relieve.
But while ’tis night have on your guards a care,
Tomorrow early arm yourselves for fight.
[95]
Hobbes1839: 475For to the Argive ships I’ll bring the war,
And trial make of Diomedes’ might,
If from the ships he drive me shall away,
Or with my spear I him shall overthrow
And send his bloody armour into Troy.
Hobbes1839: 480Tomorrow he his strength will better know.
I would I were as certain not to die,
And of old age live still free from the sorrow,
As Phœbus and Athena do, as I
Am sure we shall defeat these Greeks tomorrow.
Hobbes1839: 485Thus ended he. The Trojans, full of joy,
Their sweating horses soon took out and fed,
And some were sent into the town of Troy,
To bring in beeves and sheep, and wine, and bread,
While others fetch’d in wood. Then to the sky
Hobbes1839: 490Arose the pleasant vapour of the roast.
The Trojans confident of victory
Sat cheerful at their arms throughout the host.
As many stars as in a heav’n serene
Together with the moon appear i’ th’ night,
Hobbes1839: 495When all the tops of hills and woods are seen,
And joyful are the shepherds at the sight:
So many seem’d the fires upon the plain.
A thousand fires, and at each fifty men,
That by their horses there all night remain
Expecting till Aurora rose again.

LIB. IX.
[edit]

The Greeks deliberate of going home, but are staid by Diomed and Nestor.
Thus watch the Trojans kept. But at the fleet
Distracted was with fear the Argive host,
And their commanders; as when two winds meet,
The sea between them into heaps is toss’d.
Hobbes1839: 5And Agamemnon grieved at the heart,
Bad th’ heralds forthwith to th’ assembly call
The prime commanders ev’ry one apart,
And not make proclamation once for all;
And some of them himself he summoned.
Hobbes1839: 10When met were all the leaders of the Greeks,
They sat them down with hearts discouraged,
And tears ran down on Agamemnon’s cheeks.
As springs of water issue from a rock,
So fell the tears from Agamemnon’s eyes,
[96]
Hobbes1839: 15And to th’ assembly thus he weeping spoke.
My friends, what help can any man devise?
Jove told me I should conquer Ilium,
And unto Argos safe return again,
And now deceiv’d me has, and sends me home
Hobbes1839: 20With shame when I have lost so many men.
And thus he loves to do to show his might.
Therefore my counsel, Argives, all obey:
Let’s hoist our sails and save ourselves by flight;
For we shall never take the town of Troy.
Hobbes1839: 25This said, the princes long time silent sit,
At last Tydides rising thus replied,
King Agamemnon, so far as ’tis fit
In such a public place I must you chide.
Take it not ill, because not long ago
Hobbes1839: 30You me with want of courage did upbraid
Before the Greeks, as old and young well know.
Jove giv’n you has the right to be obey’d,
And grac’d you with the title of our king,
But has denied you a courageous spirit,
Hobbes1839: 35Which now is the most necessary thing.
You think too meanly of your people’s merit.
As for yourself, if you will needs away,
Go. That’s your way. Your ships there ready lie
That from Mycene brought you unto Troy,
Hobbes1839: 40But leave the rest their fortune here to try.
If none else stay, yet Sthenelus and I
Will not give over fighting till we know
To what side Jove will give the victory.
The Gods, I’m sure, will favour to us show.
Hobbes1839: 45This speech the lords commended very much.
Then Nestor rose, and to Tydides said,
There is not of your age another such,
For counsel wise, in battle not afraid.
None will deny but what you say is right;
Hobbes1839: 50But you have not said all you could have done;
And no great wonder, since for age you might
(So young you are) have been my youngest son.
Yet the advice you given have is best;
I that am elder what wants will supply,
Hobbes1839: 55Adding thereto what you have not express’d,
To take from Agamemnon all reply.
For none but such as have no law, nor kin,
Nor house, in civil discord can delight.
But let us first our chiefest work begin,
Hobbes1839: 60And make the young men keep good watch all night.
And let them all from you, Atrides, take
Their orders. For you are our general.
And for the princes a good supper make,
And all the eldest captains to it call.
[97]
Hobbes1839: 65It best becomes you that can do it best.
For in your tents of wine you have good store,
And easlier provided than the rest,
So many ships you have to bring in more.
Hear their advice, and do what you think fit.
Hobbes1839: 70Good counsel now we need the most of all,
Since our insulting foes so near us sit.
By this night’s counsel we must stand or fall.
Thus Nestor said, and ’twas agreed upon.
The captains of the watch then straight went forth;
Hobbes1839: 75First Thrasymedes, that was Nestor’s son;
And after him six captains more of worth,
Ascalaphus, and then Ialmenus,
Then Aphyres, and then Meriones,
And Lycomedes, and Deipyrus:
Hobbes1839: 80The seven captains of the watch were these.
And with each one a hundred spearmen went
Betwixt the pale and wall, and supped there.
And the old leaders t’ Agamemnon’s tent,
And by him nobly entertained were.
Hobbes1839: 85But when they had an end made of the feast,
Nestor his counsel further open laid,
Which formerly had always been the best;
And, looking t’ Agamemnon, thus he said.
King Agamemnon, I’ll with you begin,
Hobbes1839: 90And with you end, since you the sceptre bear,
And in your care it lies to lose or win.
You chiefly should good counsel give and hear.
Hear then what now is my opinion,
Than which a better, I think, you’ll not find,
Hobbes1839: 95Nor is it now the first time thought upon.
But heretofore I was of the same mind,
When from Achilles you Briseis took,
And I advised you to let her stay,
Though my good counsel then you could not brook,
Hobbes1839: 100But to your own great heart too much gave way,
Dishonouring the man of greatest might
In all the army, and most honoured
By all the Gods, and, contrary to right,
Taking the prize which he had purchased.
Hobbes1839: 105So that the bus’ness we have now to do
Is how to reconcile him if we can,
What gifts to give him, who shall with them go,
And with sweet language pacify the man.
This said, Atrides penitent replied,
Hobbes1839: 110O Nestor, all you charge me with is true,
And for Achilles’ sake, ’tis not denied,
Jove does th’ Achæan army now subdue.
He whom Jove loves worth a whole army is.
But since I made Achilles discontent,
[98]
Hobbes1839: 115I’ll make amends for what I did amiss,
And send a noble present to his tent.
I’ll name the gifts I’ll give him one by one.
Seven fire new trivets. Talents ten of gold.
Twenty black cauldrons. Twelve steeds that have won
Hobbes1839: 120Each one their prizes, and yet are not old.
A man that hath so many and so fleet
I think not poor, but gold may quickly win,
When I consider with their nimble feet
How many prizes they have brought me in.
Hobbes1839: 125And women seven, the best of women kind
For beauty and for works of housewifery.
And unto these Briseis shall be join’d,
And I’ll be sworn she goes untouch’d from me.
And all this shall be sent him presently.
Hobbes1839: 130Hereafter, if we win the town of Troy,
Let him, before the prey divided be,
Come in and carry to his ship away
As much as it can bear of gold and brass.
And twenty Trojan women which he please,
Hobbes1839: 135Helen except. But if it come to pass
That safe to Argos we repass the seas,
My son in law he shall be if he will,
And as my son Orestes honour’d be;
Within my house three daughters I have still,
Hobbes1839: 140Iphianassa and Laodice,
And fair Chrysothemis, take which he list,
And to his father’s house convey. For I
On settling of estate will not insist,
But of my own do that sufficiently.
Hobbes1839: 145Seven cities he shall have: Pheræ divine,
Enope, Ire, and Cardamyle,
And Pedasus that fertile is of wine,
Anthria, Æpia, all on the sea
Of sandy Pyle; and rich in sheep and kine
Hobbes1839: 150The people are, and will his laws obey,
And tribute pay as to a pow’r divine.
All this I’ll give his anger to allay.
And this content him may if anything.
Inexorable none but Pluto is,
Hobbes1839: 155But hated for’t. I am the greater king,
And elder man: he should consider this.
Thus Agamemnon. And then Nestor said,
The gifts, O king, no man can reprehend.
The next thing to be thought upon and weigh’d,
Hobbes1839: 160Is whom we shall unto Achilles send,
I think that Phœnix ought to lead the way,
Then Ajax and Ulysses, and with these
The public heralds two, Eurybates
And Odius, and here no longer stay
[99]
Ambassadors sent with gifts to reconcile Achilles in vain.
Hobbes1839: 165Than to bring water for our hands, that we
May first send up our prayers unto Jove,
That our embassage may successful be.
This said by Nestor, all the rest approve.
When water was brought in they wash’d and pray’d;
Hobbes1839: 170The young men fill’d the temperers with wine;
And round about the full cups were convey’d,
And offer’d up unto the powers divine.
When they had offer’d, and drunk what they would,
And parting were from Agamemnon’s tent,
Hobbes1839: 175Old Nestor to instruct them how they should
Achilles best persuade, out with them went.
And one by one advis’d them what to say,
Especially Ulysses. Then they went
Saying their prayers to Neptune all the way,
Hobbes1839: 180Until they came unto Achilles’ tent.
Who sitting, in his hand had a guitar
To pass the time, and sung unto the same
The noble acts that had been done in war
By th’ ancient heroes, men of greatest fame.
Hobbes1839: 185Patroclus sat before him, looking when
He should have done. Ulysses then led in
Ajax and Phœnix. And Achilles then
Leap’d up as one that had surprised been.
And them receiving kindly to them said,
Hobbes1839: 190Welcome, my friends, whate’er your bus’ness be.
To see you I am not a little joy’d,
Although th’ Achæans have provoked me.
And to his friend Patroclus order gave,
A larger temperer, said he, set up,
Hobbes1839: 195For these the dearest friends are that I have.
Pure be the wine, and give each man a cup.
Patroclus did so. And sets on a pot
Upon the flaming fire, and puts into’t
A good sheep’s chine, another of a goat,
Hobbes1839: 200Besides the chine of a fat boar to boot.
The blood boil’d out, Automedon it takes
And holds it to Achilles to divide,
Who of it many equal portions makes.
Patroclus makes a fire of wood well dried;
Hobbes1839: 205And when the flame was spent, the coals he rakes
Till they lay even; then the meat he spits
And roasts; and when ’twas roasted up it takes,
And on clean dresser-boards the same he sets;
And brought, in baskets, to the table bread;
Hobbes1839: 210And by Achilles was set on the meat.
Who when he saw the table furnished
Over against Ulysses took his seat,
And bade Patroclus sacrifice, who then
The first cut took and threw into the fire,
[100]
Hobbes1839: 215And freely to their meat then fell the men.
But when of food they had no more desire,
Then Ajax Phœnix jogg’d, which was the sign
When to begin, for which Ulysses staid.
Ulysses then fill’d up his cup with wine,
Hobbes1839: 220And speaking to Achilles, thus he said.
All health t’Achilles. Noble is your fare,
And by Atrides treated well we were.
Your tables plentifully furnished are,
But that’s not it for which we now are here.
Hobbes1839: 225Our ships in danger are to be destroy’d;
The Trojans are encamped near our wall.
Unless you condescend to give us aid,
By Hector they are like to perish all;
Who threatens he will set them all on fire,
Hobbes1839: 230And is encourag’d to’t by signs from Jove.
To see the morning rise is his desire,
And feareth neither men nor pow’rs above.
And like a dog enrag’d, and looking grim,
Assures the Trojans he our ships will burn,
Hobbes1839: 235And either put us for our lives to swim,
Or never to Achæa to return.
I am afraid the Gods perform it will,
And so to perish here will be our fate.
Rise, then; if but a little you sit still,
Hobbes1839: 240All you can do for us will come too late.
And then I am assured you will grieve,
When remedy there can be none, in vain:
Therefore, while yet you can, the Greeks relieve;
Your father’s counsel call to mind again.
Hobbes1839: 245My son, said he (when you took leave for Troy),
May Juno and Athena strengthen you.
But this one lesson take from me. I pray
Remember still your anger to subdue;
Decline all contestation of the tongue,
Hobbes1839: 250And let your conversation gentle be;
So shall you win the hearts of old and young
In the Achæan host. Thus counsell’d he.
Though you have this forgot, yet now be friends,
And since he sorry is, forget th’ offence,
Hobbes1839: 255And take the gifts he offers for amends,
Which we esteem a worthy recompence.
I’ll name the gifts he offers one by one.
Seven fire-new trivets. Talents ten of gold.
Twenty black cauldrons. Twelve steeds that have won
Hobbes1839: 260Their sev’ral prizes, and yet are not old.
A man that has so many and so fleet
I think not poor, but gold will quickly win,
When I consider with their nimble feet
What prizes to Atrides they brought in.
[101]
Hobbes1839: 265And seven fair women, best of all the kind
For beauty and for works of housewifery,
And unto these Briseis shall be join’d;
And swear he will she is from blemish free.
And all this shall be sent you presently.
Hobbes1839: 270Hereafter, if we take the town of Troy,
You may, before the prey divided be,
Come in and carry to your ship away
As much as it can bear of gold and brass;
And twenty Trojan women which you please,
Hobbes1839: 275Helen except. But if it come to pass
That safe to Argos we get o’er the seas,
His son in law you shall be if you will,
And as his son Orestes honour’d be.
Within his house three daughters he hath still,
Hobbes1839: 280Iphianassa and Laodice,
And fair Chrysothemis, take which you list,
And to your father’s house convey her; he
On settling of estate will not insist,
But of his own do that sufficiently.
Hobbes1839: 285Seven cities you shall have. Phæræ divine,
Enope, Ire, and Cardamyle,
And Pedasus that fertile is of wine,
Anthria, Æpia, all on the sea
Of sandy Pyle; and rich in sheep and kine
Hobbes1839: 290The people are, and will your laws obey,
And tribute pay as to a pow’r divine.
All this he’ll give your anger to allay.
And though Atrides and his gifts you hate;
Honour’d you are by th’ other Argives all,
Hobbes1839: 295And should have pity on their sad estate,
Who in such numbers before Hector fall;
Whom you may have the honour now to kill;
For now he will your spear no longer shun,
But stand you in the open field he will;
Hobbes1839: 300For’mongst the Greeks he thinks there’s like him none.
To this Achilles answer’d, and thus said,
Ulysses, I perceive I must be plain.
For if I be not so, I am afraid
I shall be put to speak my mind again.
Hobbes1839: 305But to prevent more importunity,
What once I say I’ll do. Those men I hate
Whose tongues and hearts I find to disagree,
As much as I abominate hell-gate.
I will no more persuaded be to fight
Hobbes1839: 310By Agamemnon or by any Greek,
Since they my labour do so ill requite,
And they that fight, and fight not fair alike.
For good and bad are equal when they die.
Then for my pain and danger in the wars,
[102]
Hobbes1839: 315What more than any other man have I?
With me as with a bird i’ t’ field it fares,
That to her unfledg’d young ones bringeth meat.
She has it in her mouth and hungry is,
Yet she forbears and gives it them to eat.
Hobbes1839: 320With the Atrides twain my case is this,
In blood by day I lead a weary life,
And sleepless am the great’st part of the night.
And why? That Menelaus may win his wife
Achilles must against the Trojans fight.
Hobbes1839: 325I did so; and from Troy twelve cities won
Upon the shore, i’ th’ land eleven more,
And all the prey I sent to Atreus’ son,
Wherein of precious treasure was great store.
A small part he divided ’mongst the host.
Hobbes1839: 330Somewhat he gave for honour to the best;
But to himself made sure to keep the most.
And firm is whatsoe’er he gave the rest;
From none but me his gift he takes away.
I am content, and let him keep her still
Hobbes1839: 335And her enjoy. But why then came to Troy
Atrides with such strength? What was his will?
Was it not only for fair Helen’s sake?
What then must no man love his wife but they?
Yes, all men of their own wives much should make,
Hobbes1839: 340If they have either wit or honesty.
And I love mine as well as he loves his,
Although she be my captive. But since she
By Agamemnon from me taken is,
Ne’er think, Ulysses, to prevail with me.
Hobbes1839: 345He shall not twice deceive me. But provide,
Ulysses, that your ships not burned be.
I know a wall, a ditch pal’d, deep and wide,
Is made by Agamemnon without me.
But all this will not Hector long keep out.
Hobbes1839: 350But with the Greeks when I went to the fight
He never durst to show his face without
The Scæan gate, save once. And then by flight
He ’scap’d. And since I am no more his foe,
To morrow to the Gods I’ll sacrifice,
Hobbes1839: 355And launch and lade my ships, and homewards go.
And you shall see me, e’er the sun shall rise,
Upon the Hellespont if you think fit,
And how my lusty Myrmidons can row.
And so, if Neptune please, the wind may fit,
Hobbes1839: 360As in three days we may to Phthia go,
Where treasure plenty I behind me left:
And now shall carry thither gold and brass,
Iron and women fair, although bereft
Of her that given me by Atrides was.
[103]
Hobbes1839: 365Tell him all this, and speak it openly,
Lest other Greeks put up the like disgrace.
As for myself, though impudent he be,
He dares no more to look me in the face.
I will no more in battle or advice
Hobbes1839: 370With Agamemnon join. Let him be glad
He could deceive me once. He shall not twice.
There let him rest. The Gods have made him mad.
I hate his gifts. And him I value not.
Though he would twenty times as much bring forth
Hobbes1839: 375As now he has, or to him shall be brought,
Or all that which Orchomenus is worth,
Or Thebæ, that Egyptian town that can
Send twenty thousand chari’ts to the field,
And all provided well with horse and man;
Hobbes1839: 380Yet so I will not t’ Agamemnon yield;
No, nor for gold so much as here is sand,
Till he has smarted for this injury,
Nor any wife will I take at his hand
Though she should fairer much than Venus be.
Hobbes1839: 385Nor though she could like Pallas work, or better,
I’ll not his daughter take. Bid him bestow her
Upon some prince he thinks more worthy. Let her
For husband have a king of greater power.
For if the Gods to Hellas bring me home,
Hobbes1839: 390Peleus will there provide me of a wife.
King’s daughters, not a few there are, of whom
I shall choose one, and with her lead my life,
And with my father live contentedly.
For all the wealth of stately Ilium,
Hobbes1839: 395Which they enjoyed in tranquillity
When yet the Argives were not hither come,
And all Apollo’s sacred treasury
Laid up at Pytho, is not price enough
The life of any man though poor to buy.
Hobbes1839: 400Horses, and kine, and sheep, and household stuff,
May be recover’d, but man’s life cannot.
My mother Thetis told me as my end,
That if I fight ’gainst Troy, ’twill be my lot
To die there, but that Fame would me commend.
Hobbes1839: 405But on the other side assured me,
That if ’gainst Ilium I warred not,
But back to Phthia went, my fate would be
Long time to live, and after be forgot.
And I advise you and the rest to sail
Hobbes1839: 410As soon as may be to your native land;
For you will not at Ilium prevail,
Since Jupiter protects it with his hand.
And now go tell the princes what I say,
That they may better counsel take to save
[104]
Hobbes1839: 415Their ships and men by sea, because the way
Which now they take no good effect will have.
Let Phœnix, if he will (not else), stay here.
This said, th’ ambassadors were mute, and sorry
They from him could no better answer bear,
Hobbes1839: 420Than a denial, flat and peremptory.
At last unto Achilles Phœnix spake;
If you, said he, resolv’d are to be gone,
And leave the war for Agamemnon’s sake,
In what estate shall I be here alone?
Hobbes1839: 425When you to Agamemnon first were sent,
You were a child, and understood not war,
Unable to say clearly what you meant,
Which the first principles of honour are.
And by your father I was with you sent,
Hobbes1839: 430To show you how you were to speak and do.
So that if you to go be fully bent,
You need not doubt but I shall be so too,
And should be though I were as young as when
I Hellas left, and from my father fled,
Hobbes1839: 435Amyntor, son of Orminus, who then
A concubine had taken to his bed;
My mother, to the end to make her hate
In such a way the old man’s company,
Was with me oftentimes importunate
Hobbes1839: 440To court her, and I did thereto agree,
And got her love. Which when my father knew,
He fell into a mighty passion,
And many bitter curses on me threw,
And pray’d the Gods I ne’er might have a son.
Hobbes1839: 445His pray’r by Pluto and by Proserpine
Was heard, and I no longer would abide
At home; but cross’d awhile was my design,
By friends and nephews that my purpose spy’d,
Who pray’d me and retain’d me with good cheer;
Hobbes1839: 450Many good kine they kill’d and lusty sheep,
And many swine were daily singed there,
And much wine spent, and nightly watch they keep
By turns nine nights together; and fires twain.
One in the court against my chamber-door,
Hobbes1839: 455Another in the porch they kept in vain.
For on the tenth the court-wall I leapt o’er
And undiscerned to king Peleus fled,
Who us’d me as a father would his son,
His only son far off begot and bred;
Hobbes1839: 460Enrich’d, and gave me the dominion
Of the Dolopians, who are a part
Of Peleus’ realm. · Now, no man like you is,
Divine Achilles, whom I love at th’ heart,
And joy that I have brought you up to this,
[105]
Hobbes1839: 465Though painful to me were your infancy,
Who not at feast nor in the house would eat,
If first I did not set you on my knee,
And into little pieces cut your meat.
And often on my breast you puk’d your wine.
Hobbes1839: 470But since I knew my line with me would end,
To take you for my heir was my design,
Who in my feeble age might me defend.
Master your heart, Achilles; for you know
The Gods, though stronger and more fear’d than you,
Hobbes1839: 475With incense and with pray’rs are made to bow,
Although from men they not receive their due.
For Prayers of high Jove the daughters are,
Though lame their feet, and squinting be their eyes;
And follow Wrath (though she runs faster far),
Hobbes1839: 480And to the hurt she does give remedies,
And cure all those that show them due respect.
But when an angry man they cannot move,
That reconcilement always will reject,
They call for judgment from their father Jove.
Hobbes1839: 485Therefore, Achilles, give respect unto
These Goddesses, the daughters of high Jove,
As other mighty men and princes do.
Had not Atrides, to redeem your love,
Offer’d you presents great, and promised more,
Hobbes1839: 490I never had advis’d you to agree
To save their ships from burning on the shore.
Till that were done you could not blamed be.
But since he does so amply make amends,
And chosen has good men to intercede,
Hobbes1839: 495Who are of all the Greeks your greatest friends,
Refuse them not the grace for which they plead,
Such was the hero’s custom heretofore,
When one had done another injury,
The damage they had done first to restore,
Hobbes1839: 500And then with gifts and pray’rs buy amity.
But I will tell you how it came to pass
At Calydon long since, not yesterday,
War ’twixt the Curets and th’ Ætolians was,
These to defend, the other to destroy.
Hobbes1839: 505For Œneus having got his harvest in,
To all the Gods made a great sacrifice;
Only Diana had no part therein,
Forgot she was; he did not her despise.
But she in anger sent a great wild boar,
Hobbes1839: 510That wasted and made havoc of his field,
And up by the roots, his goodly fruit-trees tore.
This boar Meleager, son of Œneus kill’d,
Assisted by the youth of many a state
That to the chase with men and hounds came in.
[106]
Hobbes1839: 515Between them then Diana rais’d debate
About who was to have the head and skin.
While Meleager with them went to war,
The Curets never durst approach the wall,
Although they were the greater number far.
Hobbes1839: 520But when with choler swelled was his gall,
(Which often happens to a man, though wise)
He kept his chamber and abstain’d from fight,
Offended with his mother’s injuries,
And of all company eschew’d the sight,
Hobbes1839: 525But Cleopatra, consort of his bed,
Child of Marpissa, who (by stealth) was bride
Of Idas, who at that time carried
For strength the reputation far and wide.
This Idas’ child was Meleager’s wife.
Hobbes1839: 530But Idas rashly for his dear wife’s sake
Against Apollo did engage his life,
And him at bow and arrows undertake.
But Cleopatra then surnamed was
Halcyone, that was not so before
Hobbes1839: 535Her father with Apollo fought, because
She did her mother’s death so much deplore.
With her now grieving Meleager lay,
And angry at the curses of his mother;
Who to the Gods continually did pray
Hobbes1839: 540Against his life for killing of her brother;
And from her eyes the tears ran down her breast,
And often with her hand the ground she smote.
Making to Pluto and his queen request
To kill her son; which they rejected not.
Hobbes1839: 545Meanwhile the uproar heard was at the gates,
And thumping of the tow’rs of Calydon.
To Meleager then came priests and states
Intreating him his armour to put on,
And save the town, and offer’d for his pain,
Hobbes1839: 550As much good land (so take it where he would,
One half for wine, the other half for grain)
As fifty able oxen labour could.
Then came his father rattling at his door,
His brothers, and his angry mother too:
Hobbes1839: 555But he persisted in his will the more;
His dearest friends could with him nothing do.
But when the cry and danger now was nigher,
And on the tow’rs the Curets mounted were,
And ready now to set the town on fire,
Hobbes1839: 560Then Cleopatra to her husband dear
Show’d th’ image of a town won by the foe.
How butcher’d are the men, the houses burned,
Their wives and children dragg’d away; and so
Her husband’s heart again to pity turned.
[107]
Hobbes1839: 565Then went he and repell’d the enemies,
Though what they promis’d him they never gave.
But that’s not it to which I you advise;
But first the ships, and then the Greeks to save;
But not without these gifts to go to war:
Hobbes1839: 570For more unto your honour it will be
To give them aid when satisfied you are,
By Agamemnon for the injury.
Thus Phœnix said. Achilles then replied,
Such honour I seek none. Jove honours me,
Hobbes1839: 575Since by his will I at my ships abide,
And will do till I dead or strengthless be.
No more molest me for Atrides’ sake,
But stay with me, and equal to me reign,
And such as are my friends for your friends take,
Hobbes1839: 580And do not lose my friendship his to gain.
Stay, then, this night, and take your lodging here;
My answer t’ Agamemnon these will carry;
As soon as morning shall again appear,
We’ll talk of whether we shall go or tarry.
Hobbes1839: 585And as he spake those words, he wink’d upon
Patroclus to give order for his bed,
That he himself prepare might to be gone.
Amongst them then great Ajax spake and said,
Ulysses come, our labour here is lost;
Hobbes1839: 590Let’s carry back his answer, such as ’tis,
To Agamemnon and the Argive host,
Who us expect, since obstinate he is,
And can a thought so savage entertain,
Unkind and unregardful of his friends,
Hobbes1839: 595When others for a son or brother slain
Can be contented to receive amends,
And let the man that slew him live in rest,
As soon as they have paid for their misdeed.
But you, Achilles, harbour in your breast
Hobbes1839: 600An everlasting anger without need,
And hurtful to your friends no less than foes,
For ’tis but for one maid he took away;
And for her now he seven on you bestows,
And much beside, your anger to allay.
Hobbes1839: 605Regard your house. We your domestics are,
Nearer than any of the Greeks beside,
And in your honour more concern’d by far.
Thus Ajax said. Achilles then replied,
O Ajax, noble son of Telamon,
Hobbes1839: 610I not deny but all you say is well;
But always when that man you mention,
My choler rising, makes my heart to swell.
He made me has to th’ Argives despicable,
As if I were a fool or inmate who
[108]
Hobbes1839: 615Of honour in a town is incapable,
And with the public nothing has to do.
Go, therefore, let Atrides know my mind.
I will no more against the Trojans fight,
Till Hector at my tents and ships I find,
Hobbes1839: 620And th’ Argive fleet be flaming in my sight.
For if he come unto my ships, I think,
Keen as he is, I shall his fury stay.
This said, unto the Gods above they drink,
And then they with his answer went away.
Hobbes1839: 625Patroclus then gave order for a bed
With woolly cov’rings soft and linen fine
For Phœnix, where he lay till day was spread.
But with Achilles slept a concubine,
Fair Diomeda, whom he brought away
Hobbes1839: 630From Lesbos when he had that city sack’d.
And in another part Patroclus lay,
Nor he a beautiful bed-fellow lack’d,
Fair Iphis, whom Achilles gave him when
He newly rifled had the town of Scyros,
Hobbes1839: 635And now th’ ambassadors were come again,
And to them store of people flock, desirous
To hear the news, and wine unto them brought.
But Agamemnon first inquir’d and said,
Ulysses, will he save the fleet or not,
Hobbes1839: 640Or is his choler not to be allay’d?
And he Achilles’ answer then related.
The man, said he, retains his anger still.
And now ’tis greater rather than abated,
And says, tomorrow put to sea he will.
Hobbes1839: 645And your alliance and your gifts rejects,
And says he would advise us to go home;
Since Jupiter himself the town protects,
He says in vain we stay at Ilium.
And bids you order take to save the fleet.
Hobbes1839: 650Thus said he, as these know as well as I,
Ajax and both the heralds, men discreet,
Who all the while he spake were standing by,
And Phœnix too. But he lies there all night,
That o’er the sea together they may go,
Hobbes1839: 655If Phœnix will, as soon as it is light;
But forc’d is not whether he will or no.
When thus Ulysses ended had his story,
All silent were awhile and much dismay’d
With his denial flat and peremptory.
Hobbes1839: 660At last Tydides to them spake and said,
O king Atrides, we have done amiss
With gifts and prayers thus to seek his aid,
That proud before, by this made prouder is.
Let him go when he will. Be not afraid,
[109]
Hobbes1839: 665But let’s refresh ourselves tonight with bread
And wine; for that gives men both strength and heart,
And see your men i’ th’ morn embatteled,
And at the head of them do you your part.
This said, the princes of the host admired
Hobbes1839: 670The gallant speech of valiant Diomed:
And every one unto his tent retired,
With a good will to sleep, and went to bed.

LIB. X.

Encounter of the scouts by night.
All night the princes of the Argives slept,
Save Agamemnon, who could take no rest,
But with unquiet thoughts was waking kept,
And casting for his safety what was best.
Hobbes1839: 5And frequent as the lightning flashes are
When Jove is making rain or hail i’ th’ skies,
Or somewhere punishing the proud by war;
So frequent then were Agamemnon’s sighs.
And when the fires he saw upon the plain
Hobbes1839: 10Made by the foe, and th’ acclamation
And shouts he heard, he wondered. But again
When he his ships and people look’d upon,
Then by the roots he pluck’d off from his head
Handfuls of hair, and sigh’d and groaned more;
Hobbes1839: 15And thought it best then to be counselled
By Nestor how he might himself restore.
And rising up, his coat he first puts on,
And to his smooth white feet his shoes he tied;
And then, above his coat, he cast upon
Hobbes1839: 20His back a great and tawny lion’s hide.
And Menelaus, too, that waking lay
And trembling in his bed all night, for fear
The Greeks that for his sake were come to Troy
Should fall into some great disaster there,
Hobbes1839: 25Rose up and to his brother’s tent went in.
A spear he had in’s hand, and armed was,
Having upon his back a leopard’s skin,
And on his head a helmet good of brass.
And said to Agamemnon, Brother, why
Hobbes1839: 30So early up? Have you a mind to send
Into the army of the foe some spy?
I fear you will not find so bold a friend
As thither dares to go i’ th’ night alone.
Brother, said Agamemnon, you and I
[110]
Hobbes1839: 35Must better counsel take than we have done,
Since Jove now favoureth the enemy,
And takes in Hector’s sacrifice delight.
For so much harm so soon was never done,
As he to us has done in one day’s fight;
Hobbes1839: 40Yet nor of God nor Goddess is the son.
His this day’s acts the Greeks will ne’er forget.
But go you to the princes quickly. Run.
Call up Idomeneus the King of Crete,
And the great Ajax son of Telamon,
Hobbes1839: 45While I call Nestor up and bring him to
The place which is appointed for the guard,
T’ instruct the men with what they have to do,
Because his counsel they will most regard.
For by his son the watch commanded is,
Hobbes1839: 50And with him we Meriones have join’d.
Then Menelaus farther ask’d him this,
That he might fully understand his mind,
When they are call’d, what next is to be done?
Must I stay here till you come back again,
Hobbes1839: 55Or after you about the army run?
No, no, said he, where you are now, remain.
But going call upon each one aloud,
And by the name he from his father takes,
And praise them all, let them not think you proud;
Hobbes1839: 60Pain is no shame when ’tis for our own sakes.
This said, they part, and Agamemnon went
To seek out Nestor; whom he found a-bed,
And all his armour by him in his tent,
His shield, two spears, and helmet for his head,
Hobbes1839: 65And belt of many colours finely wrought,
Which always he was wont in war to use
When he his people unto battle brought.
No labour would he on his age excuse.
Now raised on his elbow, Who, said he,
Hobbes1839: 70Are you that walk abroad when others sleep?
Stay there, I say, and come no nearer me;
Until your name you tell, at distance keep.
Seek you some officer or camerade?
I Agamemnon am, said he, your friend,
Hobbes1839: 75Whom Jove to bear such miseries hath made,
As while I live will never have an end;
And in my bed no sleep at all I take
For fear of some unfortunate event.
Unsettled is my heart, my limbs all shake,
Hobbes1839: 80And in this plight I wand’red to your tent:
And now, I pray you, since you waking lie
Come with me to the watch; for since the foe
Unto our wall encamped is so nigh,
They charge us may by night for aught we know.
[111]
Hobbes1839: 85To this old Nestor answer made and said,
Think not, Atrides, Jove will all things do
As they are now in Hector’s fancy laid?
For harder work he would be put unto
If we Achilles can but once appease.
Hobbes1839: 90But go, I’ll follow you, and call upon
Tydides and Ulysses if you please,
Ajax the less, and Meges Phyleus’ son.
I wish some other man of nimbler feet
Were to great Ajax sent to make him rise,
Hobbes1839: 95And to Idomeneus the King of Crete,
Whose quarter from this place a great way lies.
But Menelaus I intend to chide,
That sleeps and leaves the work to you alone.
’Tis no fit time within his tent t’ abide,
Hobbes1839: 100But to the princes should himself have gone.
To Nestor Agamemnon then replied,
O Nestor, he is often negligent,
And often I have pray’d you him to chide.
Yet ’tis not sloth; but my commandement
Hobbes1839: 105He always looks for, though there be no cause.
And yet tonight he has prevented me.
For up and arm’d before me now he was;
And when he came I sent him presently
To call up Ajax and the King of Crete.
Hobbes1839: 110And at the watch we both of them shall see,
Where I appointed have the rest to meet.
Nestor again replied. ’Tis well, said he,
The Greeks will of him have a better thought,
And readier obedience he will find.
Hobbes1839: 115This said, he put himself into his coat,
And tied his shoes on, and his cloak well lined,
And took his spear in hand. Then on they went
Among the Argive ships upon the sand.
And when they came unto Ulysses’ tent,
Hobbes1839: 120To call and waken him, they made a stand.
And Nestor, with his voice stretch’d to the height,
Call’d to him by his name. Ulysses straight
Came forth and said, Why come you in the night?
Your bus’ness sure must be of mighty weight.
Hobbes1839: 125O Laërtiades, said Nestor then,
Take it not ill. Such is our misery.
But come with us to call up other men,
That we may counsel take to fight or fly.
Ulysses then return’d into his tent,
Hobbes1839: 130And on his shoulders hung his painted shield;
And with them first to Diomed he went,
Whom they found armed in the open field,
His soldiers sleeping lay about him round,
And on his buckler each one had his head,
[112]
Hobbes1839: 135The butt-ends of their spears fix’d in the ground,
Whereof the points like lightning glittered.
But he himself slept on a good cow-hide,
His head upon a gaudy carpet laid.
Then Nestor came and standing at his side
Hobbes1839: 140Awak’d him with his foot, and to him said,
Awake, Tydides, hear you not how nigh
The Trojans are encamped to the fleet?
This said, Tydides leap’d up suddenly,
And when he raised was upon his feet,
Hobbes1839: 145Nestor, said he, unhappy restless man,
That aged as you are take not your ease,
When younger men there are that better can
Call up the Argive princes if they please.
’Tis true, said Nestor, I have at my tent
Hobbes1839: 150Sons of my own, and others can command,
Who might upon such errands have been sent,
But that upon the very brink we stand
Of life and death. And since you pity me,
Call little Ajax up, and Phyleus’ son.
Hobbes1839: 155For young you are, and can do’t easily.
Tydides then a lion’s skin puts on
Tawny and reaching to his heels, and then
Into his hand he took a heavy spear,
And out he went and called up those men.
Hobbes1839: 160When to the watch they come together were,
The captains of the watch were not asleep,
But all were sitting at their arms awake.
As dogs that guarding are a fold of sheep
Hearing the noise the hounds and hunters make,
Hobbes1839: 165When in the woods they chase some savage beast,
And nearer still and nearer hear the cries,
They doubt the worst, and cannot take their rest,
But list’ning stand and sleep forsakes their eyes;
So watchfully spent they the tedious night,
Hobbes1839: 170And ever when of feet they heard the tread
’Twixt them and Troy, that way they turn’d their sight;
So much they Hector’s coming on did dread.
When Nestor coming by, observ’d them had,
So, so, said he, brave lads, continue so,
Hobbes1839: 175And give no cause to Hector to be glad.
He and the princes then together go
(All that to counsel had been made to rise,
Except Meriones and Nestor’s son,
Whom they thought worthy with them to advise)
Hobbes1839: 180And part the ditch, and sitting down upon
The place to which they were pursued before
By Hector, who retiring thence, left clear
The ground from dead men’s carcasses and gore,
Of what they next should do consulted there.
[113]
Hobbes1839: 185First Nestor spake. Who dares (said he) to go
Unto the Trojan camp that lies so near,
And kill, or bring thence some outlying foe?
Or what they shall resolve upon to hear?
Whether (since they have worsted us) to stay
Hobbes1839: 190So near us, or retire into the town.
If this he do and safely come away,
He to himself acquire will great renown,
And by each one that has of ships command,
He for his service shall be well requited.
Hobbes1839: 195Each one an ewe and lamb shall give him, and
He to our public feastings be invited.
This said, they paus’d awhile, but by and by
Tydides rising spake. Nestor, said he,
To go into the Trojan camp dare I.
Hobbes1839: 200But ’twould be best some other went with me,
More hope and courage is where there are two;
What one observeth not the other may.
A man alone can little see or do,
And single judgments see but little way;
Hobbes1839: 205At these words many with him would have gone,
Ajaxes, both the greater and the less,
And stout Antilochus, old Nestor’s son,
And Menelaus and Meriones.
But most of all Ulysses long’d to see
Hobbes1839: 210What projects in the Trojan camp were laid.
For none adventure farther durst than he.
Then to Tydides Agamemnon said,
Tydides, whom I love, now choose your man;
Regard not birth nor sceptres, but the cause.
Hobbes1839: 215Take him that you think best assist you can,
And this he said in fear for Menelaus.
To this Tydides answer made again,
Since of my fellows I the choice must make,
Ulysses I prefer before all men,
Hobbes1839: 220And him for my assistant I will take;
So much in diligence he doth excel,
And so much care Athena of him has,
That I believe we both should come off well
Though through a flaming fire we were to pass.
Hobbes1839: 225Then, said Ulysses, Speak no more of me,
Nor good nor ill. The Argives know me well.
Let’s go. Two-thirds o’ th’ night are spent, you see,
As any man that sees the stars can tell.
Then put they on their arms. And Thrasymed
Hobbes1839: 230Gave Diomed a sword (who had forgot
To bring his own), and to defend his head
A leather cap without crest, call’d a pot.
Meriones unto Ulysses gave
His bow and quiver, sword and dogskin cap,
[114]
Hobbes1839: 235Pleated with thongs within, his head to save
If need should be in combat, from mishap.
For ’twixt the leathers tough inserted were
Guards of thick felt; of boar’s teeth was the brim.
Eleon was the first that did it wear,
Hobbes1839: 240But taken by Autolycus from him,
And given ’twas unto Amphidamus,
Which he to Molon gave that was his guest,
And to Meriones then left it was,
And now upon Ulysses’ head did rest.
Hobbes1839: 245And being both thus armed, forth they went
And by the way a heron dexter flew,
A lucky sign, and by Athena sent,
As by the sound made by her wings they knew.
Ulysses then unto the Goddess pray’d,
Hobbes1839: 250Hail virgin daughter of almighty Jove,
That all my labour seest, and giv’st me aid,
Now more than ever let me find your love.
Grant me that I some good exploit may do
To vex the Trojans, and come safe from thence.
Hobbes1839: 255And then Tydides pray’d unto her too.
Celestial maid, that with my father went’st
When he ambassador to Thebes was sent
With words of peace, and coming back achieved
By your assistance and encouragement
Hobbes1839: 260Such noble acts as scarce will be believed,
If you will aid me as you aided him,
O Goddess, I will to you sacrifice
A heifer, and with gold her horns I’ll trim.
This said, their suit the Goddess not denies.
Hobbes1839: 265When their devotion now was at an end,
Away they went, ’mongst carcases and blood,
Like lions that on slaughter love t ’attend.
Nor Hector and the Trojans idle stood,
But call’d a council of the chiefs, and said,
Hobbes1839: 270Who’s he will undertake what I’ll propound,
And for his pains be honourably paid,
And for his valour far and near renown’d?
I give him will two horses and a coach,
The best that shall be taken from the foe,
Hobbes1839: 275That will unto the Argive fleet approach,
And bring me word what they intend to do;
Whether their ships they guard as heretofore,
Or mean to quit the siege at Ilium.
And beaten thus, haul down their ships from shore,
Hobbes1839: 280And ere their work be finished, go home.
This said, they silent sat. But one there was,
Dolon by name, the squire Eumedes’ son,
That master was of store of gold and brass,
A sorry fellow, but that well could run.
[115]
Hobbes1839: 285Hector, said he, I’ll to the fleet approach.
Swear now by Jove, and hold your sceptre high,
I shall Achilles’ horses have and coach,
And I for you will be a faithful spy.
For down to Agamemnon’s tent I’ll go,
Hobbes1839: 290Where they consult whether to fight or fly:
For there their resolution I shall know.
Then Hector held his sceptre up on high.
O Jove, betwixt us witness bear, said he,
No Trojan shall these horses have but you,
Hobbes1839: 295And yours they shall perpetually be.
Thus Hector swore, although it prov’d not true.
Upon his shoulder then his bow he hung.
His cap of cat, a wolf’s skin was his coat.
And when he gotten clear was from the throng,
Hobbes1839: 300With spear in hand he fell into his trot.
And first Ulysses heard the sound of feet.
I hear one come, said he to Diomed,
Perhaps a spy that sent is to our fleet,
Or one that has a mind to strip the dead.
Hobbes1839: 305’Tis best t’ avoid him till he past us be,
And then to follow him and drive him on.
But lest he swifter be of foot than we,
And to the city back again should run,
Rise and be sure to turn him with your spear.
Hobbes1839: 310And when he was a land’s length past them gone
They follow’d him. And he their feet did hear,
And thought some Trojans had been coming on
By Hector sent to call him back again.
But when they from him were scarce a spear’s cast,
Hobbes1839: 315He knew then they were Agamemnon’s men,
And frighted was; and then his feet mov’d fast.
As two hounds in a wood obscure and dim
Pursue a fearful doe or hare, just so
Tydides and Ulysses hunted him,
Hobbes1839: 320When back into the herd he could not go.
When Dolon to the watch was very near,
Athena puts into Tydides’ head,
That some man else might at him throw a spear,
And be thereby before him honoured.
Hobbes1839: 325To Dolon then Tydides spake, and said,
Stay, or my spear shall make you stay; for long
I am assur’d you cannot death avoid.
And as he spake the word, his spear he flung,
And miss’d on purpose, but it lighted near.
Hobbes1839: 330Dolon affrighted, pale and trembling stands,
And in his head chatter’d his teeth with fear.
Then in they came and seiz’d on both his hands;
And Dolon weeping, then for quarter pray’d,
Great ransom for me will my father give,
[116]
Hobbes1839: 335For gold he has enough; and will, he said,
Give any price, when here he knows I live.
Then to him said Ulysses, Do not fear,
Nor think of death. But see you tell me true
Upon what weighty bus’ness you are here,
Hobbes1839: 340When others sleep, and at a time undue.
Meant you to rifle any of the dead?
Or were you sent by Hector as a spy,
Or undertook the same of your own head?
T’ Ulysses Dolon then did thus reply:
Hobbes1839: 345I was by Hector’s promises set on,
And should have had Achilles’ chariot
And horses, if I to the fleet had gone.
And good intelligence to Hector brought,
Whether the ships be guarded as before,
Hobbes1839: 350Or that the Greeks now beaten mean to fly,
And weary of their labour, watch no more.
To this again Ulysses made reply,
And smiling said, It was no small reward
You aimed at. Achilles’ horse, ye say?
Hobbes1839: 355To rule them for a mortal man ’tis hard.
The Goddess Thetis’ son they’ll scarce obey.
But tell me further; when you came away,
Where you left Hector, where his horses are,
And where his arms; where other Trojans stay
Hobbes1839: 360To sleep or watch, and whether they prepare
To go into the town, or mean t’ abide
Always so near our ships as they are now.
T’ Ulysses Dolon then again replied,
This also I will let you truly know.
Hobbes1839: 365I Hector left at Ilus’ sepulchre
With other lords in consultation,
The rest about the bonfires waking were.
But certain watch appointed there was none;
But those confederates that came from far
Hobbes1839: 370Slept at their ease all night and watched not;
For that they trusted to the Trojans’ care,
Having no wives nor children with them brought.
Ulysses then examin’d him again,
How lie the strangers? mix’d with those of Troy,
Hobbes1839: 375Or by themselves? Inform me and be plain.
Nothing, said Dolon, but the truth I’ll say.
Pæans, Pelasgians, Caucons, Leleges,
And Cars lie by the sea-side on the sands,
The rest near Thymbra quarter, and are these;
Hobbes1839: 380The Mæons, Mysians, Lycians, Phrygians.
But there’s no need to tell you ev’ry thing;
For if upon our quarters you would fall,
There lie the Thracians new come, and their king,
Rhesus by name, and utmost lies of all.
[117]
Hobbes1839: 385Such horses yet I never did behold,
Swift as the wind, and than the snow more white,
With silver cover’d is his car, and gold;
Gold are his arms, and make a gallant sight,
And fitter for a God than man to wear.
Hobbes1839: 390But try now whether I say true or no,
And send me to the ships, or bind me here.
Then said Tydides with a frowning brow,
Think not to ’scape, though all you say be true;
For if I let you loose, for aught I know,
Hobbes1839: 395You may return again to fight or view;
But hurt us cannot if I kill you now.
As Dolon then beginning was to pray,
Tydides’ sword lighted on’s neck so just,
That from his shoulders fell his head away
Hobbes1839: 400As he was speaking, and lay in the dust.
And from him then they took his cap of cat,
His spear, and wolf’s skin coat, and bow unbent,
And in his hands Ulysses took all that,
And to Minerva up his prayer sent.
Hobbes1839: 405Hail Pallas, whom we pray’d to for success
Before all other Gods, receive these gifts,
And us unto the Thracian tents address.
This said, the spoils of Dolon up he lifts,
And lays them in a tree; and for a mark,
Hobbes1839: 410They near the way laid store of boughs and reeds
To find them coming back, because ’twas dark.
Then with Tydides onward he proceeds,
The surprise of Rhesus.
And ev’ry step on arms or blood they tread,
And soon amongst the Thracians they were,
Hobbes1839: 415That sleeping lay, as if they had been dead,
And by each one his buckler and his spear.
Their horses to the chariot seats were tied.
Thus in three rows the Thracians were laid,
Rhesus i’ th’ midst; which first Ulysses spied,
Hobbes1839: 420And to Tydides speaking softly, said,
See there the horses, and see there the man
Rhesus, of whom we were by Dolon told.
Untie the horses; or kill all you can,
And I upon the horses will lay hold.
Hobbes1839: 425Tydides then, made by Minerva bold,
Amongst them killing went, and never staid
(Like lion fierce in a neglected fold)
Till he a dozen of them dead had laid.
And whomsoever Diomedes slew,
Hobbes1839: 430Ulysses following took him by the foot,
And from the place a little way him drew,
For fear the steeds, not yet accustom’d to’t,
Should boggle, tremble, and refuse to pass.
To Rhesus last of all went Diomed,
[118]
Hobbes1839: 435And kill’d him too. So he the thirteenth was.
And panted as he slept; for at his head
He dreamt Tydides all night standing was.
Ulysses to the horses went; and now
Seiz’d, and their heads together tied has:
Hobbes1839: 440But for a whip he made use of his bow.
And gotten forth, whistled to Diomed
To come away, who gave no ear thereto,
But staying with himself, considered
What further hurt he might the Trojans do.
Hobbes1839: 445To draw away the chariot by the pole,
Wherein the golden arms of Rhesus lay,
Or thence upon his shoulders bear the whole;
Or whether he more Thracians should destroy.
While thus he studied, Pallas by him stood.
Hobbes1839: 450Contented be, said she, with what is done.
To go unto the ships I think it good,
For fear you thither should be forc’d to run.
Some other God awake the Trojans may.
This said, that Pallas to him spake he thought,
Hobbes1839: 455And from the Thracian quarter came away,
And on one of the horses’ backs he got,
And tow’rds the ships at full speed then they ride,
Ulysses with his bow still switching on;
But Phœbus with Tydides Pallas spy’d,
Hobbes1839: 460And angrily call’d up Hippocoon;
Who, when he came and empty saw the ground
Where th’ horses stood, and dy’d with blood the field,
And sprawling in their blood the Thracians found,
Ay me, said he, they have my uncle kill’d.
Hobbes1839: 465The Trojans then in haste and frighted rise,
And at the place in great disorder meet,
And gaze upon the mischief with their eyes,
But they that did it fled were to the fleet.
When flying they were at the tree, where lay
Hobbes1839: 470The spoils of Dolon, there awhile they tarry,
Until Tydides fetch’d them had away,
And to Ulysses given them to carry,
And mounted was upon his horse again.
Again Ulysses switch’d them tow’rds the fleet;
Hobbes1839: 475And when they near it were, old Nestor then,
Who was the first that heard the horses’ feet,
Cried out, The sound of horses’ feet I hear;
I wish Ulysses ’twere and Diomed.
But somewhat else and worse it is, I fear;
Hobbes1839: 480So many sad mishaps run in my head.
He scarce had spoken this but they came in.
When they alighted were and welcomed
With hands and speeches of their friends had been,
Then Nestor thus Ulysses questioned:
[119]
Hobbes1839: 485Ulysses, glory of the Greeks, said he,
Whence are these horses, beauteous as the sun?
Won from the Trojans? But that cannot be;
For such amongst the Trojans I saw none,
Though I amongst them were in ev’ry fight.
Hobbes1839: 490Or given by the Gods? which may be true;
For both of you are gracious in their sight,
And Jove and Pallas have a care of you.
O noble Nestor, said Ulysses then,
Gods can give better horses if they please;
Hobbes1839: 495For richer much are they than mortal men.
Tydides from a king of Thrace took these,
Who was come newly to the Trojans’ aid;
And slain him has, besides a dozen more,
And besides these a spy that them betray’d,
Hobbes1839: 500By Hector sent your purpose to explore.
This said, Ulysses with much people went
Triumphing, and the milk-white horses drove
Over the trenches to Tydides’ tent.
There sets them up, and wheat unto them gave;
Hobbes1839: 505But Dolon’s spoils astern his ship he plac’d,
Preparing for Athena’s sacrifice.
And then into the sea they went and wash’d
The sweat from off their shoulders, legs, and thighs,
And after bathe, and ’noint themselves with oil;
Hobbes1839: 510That done, they sit down to their meat and dine;
And being thus refreshed from their toil,
Unto the Goddess Pallas offer wine.

LIB. XI.

The third fight.
Aurora rising from Tithonus’ bed,
Before both Gods and men to hold her light,
Eris from Jove the signal carried
Unto the Argive fleet of bloody fight.
Hobbes1839: 5And down unto Ulysses’ ship she went,
That was the middlemost and high’st of all,
That heard she might be to Achilles’ tent,
And Ajax’s, that they might hear her call.
At th’ outsides of the fleet they quarter’d were;
Hobbes1839: 10For they upon their prowess most relied:
Then Eris with her voice the air did tear,
And horribly to the Achæans cried,
Come quickly forth into the field and fight;
Be bold, Achæans; to the battle come.
[120]
Hobbes1839: 15Encourag’d thus, the Greeks took more delight
In staying at the war than going home.
Fellows, to arms, then Agamemnon cried,
And to put on his arms the first man was.
His leg-pieces he down to th’ ankles tied
Hobbes1839: 20With silver buckles, leg-pieces of brass;
And then puts on an armour on his breast,
That had been given him by Cinyres,
(His ancient acquaintance and his guest,)
Whilst he preparing was to pass the seas:
Hobbes1839: 25For long before the Greeks for Troy set sail,
Their purpose was at Cyprus known by fame,
And thinking such a gift might him avail,
In kindness t’ Agamemnon sent the same.
The colour was by pales distinguished,
Hobbes1839: 30Ten black, twelve gold, and twenty were of tin:
And in it three black serpents figured,
As if they creeping were unto his chin.
Their sides like rainbows look’d, which in the sky
Are shown by Jove for men to wonder at.
Hobbes1839: 35Then from his shoulder down upon his thigh
He hung his sword. Studded with gold was that.
Then took his shield which finely varied was;
Bossed in twenty places with white tin;
And round about them were ten orbs of brass;
Hobbes1839: 40And black the circle was enclos’d within.
Then Gorgo painted was with killing eyes,
And with her standing Terror and Affright:
His belt of silver was, and to the skies
Returned back again the glitt’ring light.
Hobbes1839: 45Wound up lay on it painted a great snake,
Which had three heads, and crowned was each one.
And last into his hand two spears did take,
Having his helmet on his head put on.
Thus Agamemnon armed was. And then
Hobbes1839: 50Juno and Pallas both rais’d such a sound
(To honour him before the Greeks) as when
A man that’s slain falls suddenly to th’ ground.
Then every one unto his charioteer
Commandment gave upon the ditch to stay
Hobbes1839: 55And ready be. The foot all armed were,
And forth into the field were march’d away.
But soon again the horses with them stood.
Then Jove amongst them Noise and Tumult sent;
And mingled was the morning dew with blood,
Hobbes1839: 60For on that day much blood was to be spent.
Upon a rising ground now Hector was,
Æneas with him, and Polydamas,
And three sons of Antenor, Acamas,
Agenor, Polybus, and th’ army was.
[121]
Hobbes1839: 65And Hector with a round shield at their head,
As when a star does through the clouds appear,
And presently again is covered;
Sometimes i’ th’ front was, sometimes in the rear
Giving command; his arms like lightning show.
Hobbes1839: 70As mowers standing one rank ’gainst another,
A field of barley or of wheat to mow;
So Greeks and Trojans mow down one the other.
On neither side thought any man of flight,
But like to wolves on one another fly,
Hobbes1839: 75In number equal; and gave great delight
To Eris, who (and no God else) was by.
The other Gods stayed on Olympus Hill,
Within whose folds they dwell, and murmur’d at
Their father Jove for bearing such goodwill
Hobbes1839: 80To Ilium. But he car’d not for that.
And by himself he from them went; and then
Took pride to see the Greeks and Trojans fight,
And look on killing and on dying men,
And of their arms to see the flashing light.
Hobbes1839: 85Now all the while that mounting was the sun,
The number slain on both sides was the same;
But when the woodman half his work had done,
And willingly unto his dinner came,
The Greeks then brake the Trojan ranks, and on
Hobbes1839: 90Fell Agamemnon, and Bienor slew,
Both him and Ocles his companion,
That drove the horses which the chariot drew.
He lighting and assailing him was slain;
And Ocles had no time his spear to throw:
Hobbes1839: 95For Agamemnon’s spear had pierc’d his brain,
Passing both through his helmet and his brow.
These there he left, stript both of arms and coat,
And Antiphus and Isus then drew near,
Both Priam’s sons, one legal, th’ other not,
Hobbes1839: 100Upon one seat, and Isus charioteer.
Once by Achilles taken were these men,
As they were feeding sheep on Ida’s hills,
And for their ransom were set free again;
But both of them now Agamemnon kills.
Hobbes1839: 105For Isus’ breast he pierc’d through with his spear;
The other with his sword he overthrew,
And seen him had when he was prisoner.
And that ’twas Antiphus (when stript) he knew.
As when a lion with his mighty teeth
Hobbes1839: 110Crusheth the tender issue of a hind,
Which the affrighted dam stands by and seeth,
And grieveth, but no remedy can find;
And skipping in the woods for shelter seeks
To save her own life; so the Trojans fled,
[122]
Hobbes1839: 115Pursu’d by Agamemnon and the Greeks,
And thought not on their fellows they left dead.
T’ Hyppolochus then comes he and Pisander,
Sons of Antimachus, a person noted
For having gold receiv’d of Alexander,
Hobbes1839: 120And for it in the common council voted.
And these two Agamemnon took alive;
For by mischance the reins slipp’d from their hands,
And then they saw it was in vain to strive,
And Agamemnon now before them stands.
Hobbes1839: 125Then as they sat together on one seat,
Save us (said they) Atrides, let us live,
For we redeem’d shall be with ransom great,
Our father for us what you please will give.
Are you Antimachus’s son, said he,
Hobbes1839: 130That gave advice to murder Menelaus,
Contrary to the laws of honesty,
When of the Greeks ambassador he was,
And with Ulysses sent into the town?
You for your father’s evil deed must pay.
Hobbes1839: 135Then from his car Pisander he struck down;
With breast pierc’d through upon his back he lay.
Hyppolochus was lighted and on foot,
And with the sword of Agamemnon slain,
Who cuts his head off, and his hands to boot,
Hobbes1839: 140And then upon the Trojans press’d again.
And great the slaughter was of them that fled,
And wonderful the dust that raised was;
And both the field and army covered,
Forc’d up by troops of horses shod with brass.
Hobbes1839: 145As boughs fall in a wood that’s set on flame,
And shaken by the violence of wind,
So fast unto the ground the Trojans came,
When Agamemnon follow’d them behind.
And many horses made their chariots rattle,
Hobbes1839: 150Which empty ran about when no man drives.
For they that drove them fall’n were in the battle,
A lovelier sight to vultures than their wives.
But Hector was by Jove set out of sight
Of all this dust and slaughter and disorder:
Hobbes1839: 155But Agamemnon still with all his might
Pursuing killed, and to kill gave order.
Then they that were encamp’d at Ilus’ tomb
Retir’d in haste unto the sycamore,
Half the plain over towards Ilium,
Hobbes1839: 160And after them Atrides, covered o’er
With blood and dust. But when the Trojans were
Got back unto the beech near Scæa gate,
Awhile they for their fellows stayed there,
Who swiftly ran, fearing to come too late.
[123]
Hobbes1839: 165As when a lion falleth in the night
Upon a herd of kine, and one must die,
And all the rest are put into a fright,
So Agamemnon made the Trojans fly;
And all the way he went the hindmost kill’d.
Hobbes1839: 170And from their cars some forward fell, and some
Upon their backs, and lay dead on the field.
But when unto the wall they near were come,
Then Jove came down to Ida from the sky
With thunder in his hand, and t’ Iris said,
Hobbes1839: 175Go, Iris, quickly, and tell Hector I
Command him Agamemnon to avoid
As long as in the front he raging is,
And let the fight by others manag’d be.
But when he Agamemnon wounded sees,
Hobbes1839: 180And leave the field, I’ll give the victory
To him, and he shall put them all to flight,
And to the fleet go killing all the way,
Until the sun be set, and dark the night.
This said, away she went without delay;
Hobbes1839: 185And down from Ida came to Ilium,
And finding him upon his car, To you
From Jove (said she) O Hector, I am come
To warn you Agamemnon to eschew,
As long as in the front he raging is.
Hobbes1839: 190And let the fight by others manag’d be;
But when by spear or bow he wounded is,
And leaves the field, he’ll give the victory
To you, and you shall put them all to flight,
And to the fleet go killing all the way,
Hobbes1839: 195Until the sun be set, and dark the night.
Having thus said, she did no longer stay.
Then Hector armed, leap’d unto the ground,
And with two spears well pointed in his hand
Exhorting went about the army round.
Hobbes1839: 200Their faces then the Trojans turn, and stand.
The first that did advance Atrides was.
But tell me, Muse, who first came in his way?
One of Antenor’s sons, Iphidamas,
That was brought up in Thrace (though born at Troy)
Hobbes1839: 205By Cisseus, who his mother’s father was,
From childhood till to man’s estate he came,
And made his son in law. But then, because
The coming of the Greeks was known by Fame,
Was thence, although but new espoused, sent
Hobbes1839: 210To th’ aid of Priam and his sons at Troy,
And at Percopa landing t’ Ilium went,
And now was standing in Atrides’ way.
First Agamemnon threw his spear and miss’d:
Iphidamas then at Atrides threw,
[124]
Hobbes1839: 215And hit his belt, which did the stroke resist,
For massy silver was the belt and true,
And bent the point as if it had been lead.
Then Agamemnon with his sword came on,
And smote him on the neck, and laid him dead.
Hobbes1839: 220Thus died Iphidamas, Antenor’s son:
And much to be lamented was his case,
That far from his espoused virgin wife,
Without receiving from her any grace,
Should fighting for his country lose his life.
Hobbes1839: 225He given for her had a thousand kine,
And promis’d sheep and goats a thousand more.
Now slain, and stript was of his armour fine
By Agamemnon, and triumphed o’er.
But Coön then, Antenor’s eldest son,
Agamemnon wounded.
Hobbes1839: 230Incensed by his brother’s death, came in,
And pierc’d Atrides’ arm close by the bone,
(Unseen) the elbow and the wrist between.
Then cold was Agamemnon’s heart with fear,
But gave not over. For as Coön drew
Hobbes1839: 235His brother off, he came on with his spear,
And with a thrust beneath his shield, him slew,
And, on his brother, then cuts off his head.
Thus these two brothers finished their fate.
Atrides still the slaughter followed
Hobbes1839: 240With spear, and sword, and stones of mighty weight,
Not giving over whilst the wound was warm.
But when ’twas cleans’d, and stayed was the blood,
So cruel then the pain was in his arm,
That on the ground no longer stay he could.
Hobbes1839: 245Then, mounted on his chariot, he said,
Drive to the ships; for he was in great pain.
And on the princes then the charge he laid,
The fight against the Trojans to maintain.
My friends, said he, ’tis your part now to stay
Hobbes1839: 250The fury of the Trojans from our ships;
Since Jove not suffers me to fight all day.
This said, the charioteer his horses whips,
Which when they felt, away they swiftly went,
And stain’d with sweat and powder of the plain,
Hobbes1839: 255Brought wounded Agamemnon to his tent,
From off the field bestrew’d with bodies slain.
As soon as Hector saw Atrides gone,
Now Trojans, Dardans, Lycians, he cried,
Now charge the Greeks with resolution,
Hobbes1839: 260For he is gone on whom they most relied,
And Jove assures me that the day is mine.
This said, like hounds encourag’d by the hunter
Against a lion or a tusked swine,
The Trojans boldly marched to th’ encounter,
[125]
The Greeks beaten to their camp.
Hobbes1839: 265And on them fell, with Hector at their head.
And as a down-right wind the sea, so he
The Argive ranks and files disordered,
And them that fled pursued furiously.
But tell me, Muse, whilst Hector, Priam’s son,
Hobbes1839: 270By Jove assisted, did the Greeks pursue,
And great renown amongst the Trojans won,
Who and how many were the men he slew.
Assæus first, and then Antonous,
Oplites, Dolops, and Ophelitus,
Hobbes1839: 275And then Æsymnus, and Agelaus;
Then Orus, and the last Hipponous.
All these were princes in the Argive host.
But look how many are the drops of dew,
When into th’ air the sea by winds is tost,
Hobbes1839: 280So many private soldiers Hector slew.
And then incurable their loss had been,
And fled had to their ships the Greeks, dismay’d,
Had not Ulysses then the same foreseen,
And to Tydides, not far from him, said,
Hobbes1839: 285Tydides, to what purpose stand we here?
Come hither, man, and stand close to my side,
To let our ships be lost great shame it were.
Tydides to Ulysses then replied,
Yes, yes, Ulysses, I will with you bide,
Hobbes1839: 290Though we shall take but little pleasure here,
For Jove I see inclineth to their side.
This said, he at Thymbræus threw his spear,
Which lighting on his left pap pierc’d him through.
Ulysses slew Molion, Priam’s man;
Hobbes1839: 295Upon the field unstript they left these two,
And then into the Trojan throng they ran,
(Whilst th’ other Greeks from Hector swiftly fly)
Like two wild boars that turn upon the hounds,
That know they may upon their strength rely,
Hobbes1839: 300And scatter ’mongst the Trojans death and wounds.
And there two valiant sons of Merops kill’d,
As they together on one chariot sate.
This Merops was in prophecy well skill’d,
And bade them stay, and told them had their fate.
Hobbes1839: 305But the two forward youths would not obey,
But led unto the war by destiny,
Unluckily came in Tydides’ way,
Where by his hand their fortune ’twas to die.
Hippodamas was by Ulysses kill’d,
Hobbes1839: 310As also was Eypirichus; and now
None knew who had the better in the field
But Jove, who looked on from Ida’s brow.
And then Agastrophus, King Pæon’s son,
Was by Tydides wounded in the thigh,
[126]
Diomed, Machaon, Ulysses, and Eurypylus wounded.
Hobbes1839: 315And would have fled, but horses he had none,
His man that held them for him was not nigh.
Yet fought he ’mongst the foremost till he died.
This Hector saw, and towards Diomed
His horses turn’d, and to the Trojans cried,
Hobbes1839: 320Come, follow me, and they all followed.
And Diomed, as soon as he saw this,
Though chill with fear, unto Ulysses said,
To us this plaguy Hector rolling is;
But stand, and let him see we’re not afraid.
Hobbes1839: 325This said, he straight at Hector threw his spear,
Which hit his helmet, but glanc’d from the brass,
And never to his tender skin came near:
This helmet given him by Apollo was.
But stunn’d he was, and resting on his knees,
Hobbes1839: 330He kept himself from falling with his hand.
Dark are his eyes, nothing at all he sees,
And for a while unable is to stand.
But whilst Tydides on the plain advanced,
To get into his hand again the spear,
Hobbes1839: 335Which from the place he aim’d at far was glanced,
Hector was mounted, and his senses clear.
Tydides then upon him look’d, and said,
Thou dog, escap’d an evil death thou hast;
And twice been saved by Apollo’s aid,
Hobbes1839: 340But sure I shall dispatch thee at the last,
For of a God I also have the aid.
But now to other Trojans I’ll go on,
Such as shall come into my way. This said,
Away he went to strip King Pæon’s son.
Hobbes1839: 345And then, as Diomed was taking from
Agastrophus the armour of his breast,
Paris, that leaning stood at Ilus’ tomb,
To him an arrow unperceiv’d addrest,
Which hit him on the foot above the toes,
Hobbes1839: 350And to the ground clean thorough went the shaft.
Then openly into the field he goes,
And coming nearer to him spake, and laugh’d.
Ye’re hit, said he, Tydides. Would it had
Been on your belly, that you might have died;
Hobbes1839: 355The Trojans would of that been very glad,
That are so often by you terrified.
Proud, boasting archer, said Tydides, know,
If in your armour you before me stood,
To try your valour and your force, your bow
Hobbes1839: 360And arrows would not do you any good.
You value such a scratch as this too much.
The weapons of the strengthless blunted are:
Mine is not so; but whom it does but touch,
His wife lamenting tears her cheeks and hair;
[127]
Hobbes1839: 365His children orphans are; and red the ground
Whereon he rotting lies; and vultures more
Than women standing by him will be found.
Ulysses then, that near him was before,
Stepp’d in, and stood betwixt him and his foes
Hobbes1839: 370Whilst from his foot the arrow he pull’d out.
Then to his char’ot up Tydides goes,
And left the field where he had nobly fought.
And now Ulysses left was all alone,
For from him all the rest were fled for fear,
Hobbes1839: 275And then unto himself he made his moan.
Ay me, said he, what now shall I do here?
Though many be the foes, ’tis ill to fly,
But yet, since Jove saves all the rest by flight,
It would be worse if I alone should die.
Hobbes1839: 380But why dispute I, when I ought to fight?
None but a coward from the fight will run.
But he that honour loves will stand his ground,
And be content with what he cannot shun,
Whether it be to give or take a wound.
Hobbes1839: 385While thus Ulysses argued in his mind,
Hector was near him, and enclos’d him had
With targetiers before him and behind,
Whereof they had no reason to be glad.
As when the hounds by hunters are set on
Hobbes1839: 390A wild boar as he comes out from the wood,
He whets his teeth, they from him will not run;
Even so Ulysses ’mongst the Trojans stood;
Where by him slain first Deiopites was,
And Thoon then, and Eunomus he kill’d;
Hobbes1839: 395And after these he slew Chersidamas,
As from his car he lighted in the field.
Then leaving these, slew Charops with his spear,
Socus, his brother Hippasus his son.
Then Socus to him came, and standing near
Hobbes1839: 400Unto Ulysses, with a speech begun.
Ulysses, much renown’d for craft and pain,
This day you either must the honour wear
Of having Hippasus his two sons slain,
Or lose your own life, wounded by my spear.
Hobbes1839: 405Then threw his spear, and pierc’d Ulysses’ shield,
His breast-plate, and his coat, and tore his skin.
But Pallas him preserv’d from being kill’d;
For to the vital parts it went not in.
Ulysses knew the wound not mortal was;
Hobbes1839: 410Made a step back, and then to Socus said,
Fool that thou art, that wouldst not let me pass
On other Trojans, hast thyself destroy’d,
I do not think you shall this hour outlive,
But from my spear’s sharp point receive your death,
[128]
Hobbes1839: 415And unto me more reputation give,
And leave your soul unto the pow’rs beneath.
Then Socus turn’d himself about to fly,
But overtaken by Ulysses’ spear,
That pierc’d him back and breast, he fell down dead.
Hobbes1839: 420Then scornfully Ulysses did him jeer.
O Socus, gallant man at arms, said he,
By death prevented is your enterprise;
Your eyes shall not by parents closed be,
But shall be pecked out by crows and pyes.
Hobbes1839: 425Then from his shield and body he pull’d out
The spear which at him was by Socus thrown.
The blood then from the wound did freely spout,
Which when the Trojans saw, they straight came down
And all together tow’rds him went the rabble.
Hobbes1839: 430Then he retir’d, and as he going was,
Thrice called out, as loud as he was able,
For help; and thrice was heard by Menelaus,
Who t’ Ajax said, Ulysses’ voice I hear,
And like the voice of one that is distrest.
Hobbes1839: 435He hemm’d in by the Trojans is, I fear;
Come, let us to him go, and do our best
To fetch him off. For valiant though he be,
I fear, unless we aid him with great speed,
He by the Trojans will be slain, and we
Hobbes1839: 440Lose a good man, of whom we oft have need.
Then up they went, and found him by the foes
Environ’d round. As when a stag is shot
By some young man, he swiftly from him goes
Whilst strong his knees are, and his blood is hot.
Hobbes1839: 445But when he by the arrow tamed is,
The wolves feed on him in the gloomy wood;
Then comes the lion, and the prey is his.
About Ulysses so the Trojans stood,
Till Ajax, with a target like a tower,
Hobbes1839: 450Came to his aid; then sev’ral ways they fled.
Ulysses, now no longer in their power,
Was from the field by Menelaus led,
And mounted on his chariot again.
But on went Ajax, and slew Pandocus,
Hobbes1839: 455King Priam’s son, and wounded three good men,
Lisander, Pylartes, and Pyrasus.
Then as a river coming to the plain,
And swell’d by Jupiter with show’rs of rain
More than the banks are able to contain,
Hobbes1839: 460Bears oaks and pines before it to the main,
So Ajax charg’d the Trojan troops. But this
Hector knew nothing of; for far off now
Upon Scamander’s banks he fighting is,
And to the ground doth many an Argive throw.
[129]
Hobbes1839: 465There was the noise, there aged Nestor stood,
And there Idomeneus, with their steeds.
And Hector, that the use well understood
Of spears and horses, there did mighty deeds.
And yet the Greeks retir’d not; nor had done
Hobbes1839: 470If Paris had not with an arrow smote
Machaon on the shoulder to the bone.
Three-forked was the arrow which he shot;
And mightily the Argives were afraid
Since now the foe prevail’d, he would be slain.
Hobbes1839: 475To Nestor then Idomeneus said,
O Nestor, to your char’ot mount again,
And with Machaon make haste to the ships.
A surgeon many other men is worth.
For many other men alive he keeps
Hobbes1839: 480By making salves and drawing weapons forth.
Then Nestor mounteth and the horses whips,
Which they no sooner feel than they are gone,
And quickly brought unto the hollow ships
Machaon Æsculapius his son.
Hobbes1839: 485Mean while Cebriones, the chari’teer
Of Hector, saw the Trojans were distress’d,
And to him said, To what end stay we here,
Since yonder by the Greeks our friends are press’d?
’Tis Ajax that disorders them, I see;
Hobbes1839: 490I know him by the largeness of his shield.
Now where they fighting are most furiously,
Let us go down to that side of the field.
This said, he crack’d his whip, his horses ran
Unto the place where greatest was the cry,
Hobbes1839: 495O’er many a shield, and over many a man
That gasping on the bloody field did lie.
The horses’ bellies and the char’ot wheels
And axletrees with blood were cover’d o’er,
Forc’d up in drops by the swift horses’ heels.
Hobbes1839: 500And Hector rushing in, their battles tore.
But Hector still took heed of Ajax’ spear.
And fought in other places of the field.
But Ajax, struck by Jupiter with fear,
Amazed, at his shoulder hung his shield;
Hobbes1839: 505And staring on the foe awhile he stood,
Then turn’d and softly from them went away.
As when a lion coming from the wood
Down to a pasture, on a cow to prey,
Is hu’d by dogs and peasants in the night,
Hobbes1839: 510And hungry sometimes goes and sometimes stands,
But cannot have his will for all his might,
So many spears are flying from their hands,
And flaming brands which put him in a fright,
Keen as he is, then sullenly he goes
[130]
Hobbes1839: 515Back to the wood and comes no more in sight;
So then retired Ajax from his foes.
Or as an ass, in spite of many boes,
Is got into the corn, and there abides,
Though they upon him fall with blows and noise,
Hobbes1839: 520And many cudgels break upon his sides,
For he the force of boys but little feels,
He hardly will be driven out though fill’d,
And now and then kicks at them with his heels:
So Ajax at the last went off the field,
Hobbes1839: 525By Hector and the Trojans still pursu’d,
Upon his shield receiving many a spear;
Sometimes his back, sometimes his face he show’d,
So that they could not to the ships come near.
Thus he between the Greeks and Trojans stands,
Hobbes1839: 530While spears abundance at him hurled were;
Some in his shield stuck, driven by strong hands,
Some on the ground fell short and fix’d were there.
But then Eurypylus, Euæmon’s son,
That saw him thus oppress’d, came to his side,
Hobbes1839: 535And wounded with his spear Apisaon
The liver through; and on the place he died.
But as he stripp’d him lying on the ground
Was shot by Alexander in the thigh,
And broken was the arrow in the wound,
Hobbes1839: 540And much increased was his pain thereby.
Then went Eurypylus into the crowd,
And cried out to the princes of the host,
Turn and save noble Ajax from this cloud
Of Trojan spears, or else he will be lost.
Hobbes1839: 545This said, the best commanders to him go
With spears advanc’d, and bucklers turn’d before,
And place themselves between him and the foe.
And then again the fight was very sore.
Mean while Achilles as he sitting was
Hobbes1839: 550On high astern his ship to see them fight,
Perceived Nestor and Machaon pass,
And to Patroclus call’d with all his might,
Come hither, friend. Patroclus heard him call,
For he was sitting in Achilles’ tent,
Hobbes1839: 555And (which was the beginning of his fall)
Immediately rose up and to him went,
And said, Achilles, what’s your will with me?
Achilles then replied, Patroclus, now
The Argives, I believe, will bend the knee,
Hobbes1839: 560For their condition never was so low.
But go to Nestor and informed be
Who ’tis that he brought with him from the fight.
Machaon by his back he seem’d to me,
But of his face I could not have a sight.
[131]
Hobbes1839: 565So many cars and horses cross’d the way.
This said, unto the ships Patroclus went;
But at the ships arrived now were they,
Alighted and gone into Nestor’s tent:
The horses by Eurymedon untied
Hobbes1839: 570Were cooled by the sea-side in the air,
And of their sweat well cleansed were and dried,
And in the mean time Ecameda fair,
That was the daughter of Arsinous,
And taken by Achilles was when he
Hobbes1839: 575Conquer’d and sack’d the city Tenedus,
And by the Greeks to Nestor giv’n; and she
To Nestor and Machaon setteth up
A table with a black foot smooth and fine,
And on it set a basket, and a cup,
Hobbes1839: 580And to each one before him set on wine.
The cup with nails of gold was studded o’er,
Four ears it had, and two doves at each ear,
And those were gold, and at the foot two more
In posture such as if they feeding were.
Hobbes1839: 585Nestor to Troy had with him brought this cup.
Another scarce could lift it from the table
When fill’d with wine; though he to take it up,
Old as he was, and easily was able.
And in the same the woman made the drink,
Hobbes1839: 590With goat’s-milk cheese, and white flour sprinkled o’er,
And left it on the board full to the brink.
Then quenched they their thirst, and drank no more,
But talking sat, to put out of their thought
Their ill success. Now at the door o’ th’ tent
Hobbes1839: 595Patroclus was, and in by Nestor brought,
And pray’d to sit, but he would not consent,
But said, Achilles bade me ask you who
It is whom you brought with you from the fight.
And this already I can answer to.
Hobbes1839: 600Machaon ’tis that sits there in my sight.
What need then is there of my longer stay?
Return I will with all the speed I can,
For fear he should some blame upon me lay,
Though I deserve it not. You know the man.
Hobbes1839: 605What makes Achilles, aged Nestor said,
Of th’ Argives wounded men to take such care?
He knows not how the army is dismay’d,
Nor yet how many of them wounded are.
Ulysses wounded is, and Diomed,
Hobbes1839: 610And Agamemnon, and Eurypylus,
And this man whom I with me hither led.
Achilles pity has on none of us;
Although our safety now lie in his hands.
Intends he to sit still till Hector burn
[132]
Hobbes1839: 615In spite of us our ships upon the sands,
And ev’ry one of us kill in his turn?
For now my strength decayed is with age.
O that I were as strong as I was then
When war ’twixt us and th’ Elians did rage,
Hobbes1839: 620And we our cattle fetch’d from them again,
And slew Itymoneus that took our kine,
For I then went his cattle to distrain,
And take amends for those he took of mine.
There he defending them by me was slain,
Hobbes1839: 625And all his people from him ran away.
And there we took of fifty herds of kine
And of as many herds of goats a prey,
As many flocks, as many herds of swine,
And horses three times fifty, females all,
Hobbes1839: 630Of colour sandy mix’d with sparks of light;
And most of them had foals, and to the wall
Of Pyle I brought this booty all by night.
My father Neleus joyful was to see’t;
For yet he thought I was for war too young.
Hobbes1839: 635Next morn the criers make the people meet,
(All those to whom the Elians had done wrong)
The lords amongst them then divide the prey.
Many there were that had been injured,
And with their shares contented sent away,
Hobbes1839: 640Though Pylus were not well inhabited.
For Hercules not many years before
Had kill’d the best of them. And Neleus then
Had twelve good sons, whereof he left no more
Alive but me. This made th’ Epian men
Hobbes1839: 645Despise our number small, and do us wrong.
And Neleus now unto himself did keep
The best herd of the kine, and from among
The flocks chose one that had three hundred sheep,
And justly, since so great a loss had none.
Hobbes1839: 650For he four steeds unto the games had sent
Of value great, which all had prizes won.
But by Augias his commandement,
When for a tripod they prepar’d to run,
Together with the cars were there detain’d.
Hobbes1839: 655Chari’teers related what was done.
And Neleus then the best o’ th’ prey retain’d;
And ev’ry man had of the rest his share.
This done unto the Gods we sacrifice.
Mean while the Elians for war prepare,
Hobbes1839: 660And two days after altogether rise,
And forth o’ th’ town went they both foot and horse,
And with them Molion’s two sons, not yet
Arrived at the age of martial force,
And round about the town Colone sit.
[133]
Hobbes1839: 665Colone is a frontier-town, between
Elis and Pyle, upon Alphæus’ side.
Passing the plain they were by Pallas seen;
And she aloud unto the Pylians cried,
To arms, you men of Pyle. Then in the night
Hobbes1839: 670We put on arms, and to the field we hied;
And cheerfully went ev’ry one to fight.
My horses only were convey’d aside.
For Neleus thought I was in war unskill’d:
But I at home could not be made t’ abide,
Hobbes1839: 675But with the rest on foot went to the field,
For on the Goddess Pallas I relied.
Near to Arene falls into the main
A little brook. All night by that we lay,
And in the morn betime we march’d again,
Hobbes1839: 680And to Alphæus came in half a day.
And there to Jove his sacred rites we paid.
To Neptune and Alphæus each a bull;
An heifer to the heav’nly martial maid
We gave; and when the bands of foot were full,
Hobbes1839: 685Then sup we in our ranks, and armed slept.
Th’ Epeians still the town besieging lay;
But seeing the war was now so near them crept,
They rose; then presently began the fray.
And there the first man that was slain I slew,
Hobbes1839: 690Which Molius was, Augias’ son-in-law.
He wedded Acameda had, who knew
As many med’cines as the world e’er saw.
Him first I slew, and to his char’ot mounted.
Then fled th’ Epeians scatter’d here and there:
Hobbes1839: 695For he the best amongst them was accounted.
And as they fled I follow’d with my spear,
And fifty char’ots took, and at each one
Two men I kill’d; for like a storm I went;
Nor had I left to Molius any son,
Hobbes1839: 700If Neptune had not hinder’d my intent,
That took them up and sav’d them in a cloud.
Great honour won the Pyleans that day;
For on the plains we chac’d th’ Epeians proud,
Killing and gath’ring armour all the way
Hobbes1839: 705Until we came unto Buprasium,
Alesium, and Rock-Olene; and there
Advis’d we were by Pallas to go home.
To Pylus then we went and welcome were.
And thanks were given to the Gods, but most
Hobbes1839: 710To Jupiter the greatest God. And then
In general were thanked all the host,
And Nestor namely above other men.
Thus I behav’d myself amongst the Greeks,
Whereas Achilles sitting in his tent,
[134]
Patroclus is persuaded by Nestor to obtain of Achilles to be sent to the aid of the Greeks in Achilles’ armour.
Hobbes1839: 715Neglecting us, his own contentment seeks;
Though if our fleet be lost he will repent.
But, O Patroclus, the advice was good
Menœtius your father gave you then
When I at Phthia was and by him stood,
Hobbes1839: 720By Agamemnon sent to levy men.
To Peleus’ house Ulysses came and I,
And there we found Menœtius and you.
And you upon Achilles waited nigh,
And Peleus to the Gods fat cattle slew
Hobbes1839: 725I’ th’ court o’ th’ grass, a gold cup in his hand,
And pour’d wine on the burning sacrifice,
And you then saw us in the gate-house stand,
Though busy you were then to burn the thighs.
Achilles to us came and led us in,
Hobbes1839: 730And made us sup, and supper being done,
To tell our bus’ness then I did begin,
Which was to bring with us to Troy his son.
Both he and you desirous were to go;
And Peleus then unto Achilles said,
Hobbes1839: 735Strive still to be the best, and let the foe
Be always of your spear the most afraid.
Then to you spake your father; Son, said he,
Achilles is a better man of war
Than you, and higher in nobility
Hobbes1839: 740Of blood; but you in age before him are.
Give him good counsel therefore, and suggest
What’s for his good, although he see it not:
He will obey when for himself ’tis best;
Thus he advis’d you, though you have forgot.
Hobbes1839: 745But do it now. For ’tis not yet too late.
Who knows but you may make him change his mind?
Or if he still continue obstinate,
Or in some oracle a scruple find,
Or Thetis told him somewhat has from Jove,
Hobbes1839: 750Yet let him send his Myrmidons with you,
The Trojans from the navy to remove,
And give th’ Achæans time to breathe anew.
But let him give you his own arms. Then they
(When like unto Achilles you appear,
Hobbes1839: 755Leading fresh forces) fly will into Troy,
And rid th’ Achæans of their present fear.
This said, Patroclus, grieved, went his way,
And tow’rds Achilles’ tent ran back apace,
Passing by where Ulysses’ vessels lay.
Hobbes1839: 760There were the altars, there the market-place,
There were the courts of justice. There he met
Eurypylus, with the arrow in his wound,
And from his head and shoulders dropp’d the sweat,
And bled apace, but still his sense was sound.
[135]
Hobbes1839: 765Then, pitying him, Patroclus spake, and said,
Ah! poor commanders of the Achæan host,
Must we be all so far from home destroy’d,
And lie for dogs’-meat on the Trojan coast?
But say, Eurypylus, is there no way
Hobbes1839: 770To keep off Hector, but must perish all?
Nothing I know, said he, can Hector stay,
But in our flaming ships we all must fall.
For all the best of us here wounded lie,
And still the Trojan power grows more and more.
Hobbes1839: 775But, O Patroclus, cut out of my thigh
This arrow-head; for it torments me sore,
And with warm water wash away the blood,
And salves apply, the same that Chiron knew,
(The best of Centaurs) to be very good,
Hobbes1839: 780And taught Achilles, and Achilles you.
For of two surgeons in the army, one
As much need of a surgeon hath as I,
And Podalirius to the fight is gone.
Patroclus to him then made this reply.
Hobbes1839: 785How can this now be done, Eurypylus,
Since to Achilles I must go with speed
With Nestor’s answer? Yet to leave you thus
In torture, were but an ungentle deed.
Then in his arms he bears him to his tent,
Hobbes1839: 790And there, upon a many cow-hides spread,
Laid him, and with his knife to work he went,
And from his thigh cuts out the arrow-head.
And in his hands he bruis’d a bitter root,
And wash’d away the blood. When that was done.
Hobbes1839: 795He cleans’d the wound, applied the med’cine to’t,
And straight the blood was stopp’d, the pain was gone.

LIB. XII.

The fourth fight, Hector having entered the Argive camp, at the ships.
Thus was Eurypylus of pain releas’d.
Meanwhile the Greeks and Trojans fiercely fought,
Nor could the Argive wall and trench (unbless’d,
For on a hecatomb they never thought)
Hobbes1839: 5Though made their ships and booty to defend,
Keep Hector and the Trojans long time out.
For very quickly cometh to an end
Whate’er without the Gods men go about.
Indeed while Hector liv’d, and angry lay
[136]
The fourth fight.
Hobbes1839: 10Achilles at his tent, and would not fight,
And standing were the walls and town of Troy,
The great wall of the Argives stood upright.
But when the bravest Trojans once were slain,
And many Greeks, and burnt was Ilium,
Hobbes1839: 15That had almost ten years held out in vain,
And what remained of the Greeks gone home.
Then Neptune and Apollo both devise
The wall to ruin, and the rivers all
That in this spacious mountain Ida rise
Hobbes1839: 20Upon this Argive mighty work make fall.
Aresus, Rhesus, Heptaporius,
Æsepus, Rhodius, Scamander, and
Besides these six, the river Granicus,
And Simoeis, upon whose banks of sand
Hobbes1839: 25Many a shield and helmet scatter’d lay,
And many a Demi-God. These rivers all
Apollo turned from their wonted way,
Directing them unto the Argives’ wall.
Nine days perpetually they thither run,
Hobbes1839: 30And Jove nine days together pour’d down rain,
To th’ end the work might be the sooner done.
And Neptune with his trident from the main
Before them went and wrenched out the stone
And timber which had there been laid with pain
Hobbes1839: 35The deep’st of all for the foundation,
And made it to the sea all smooth again.
And strew’d again with sand the ample shore;
And made the brooks in their own channels run
No otherwise than they were wont before:
Hobbes1839: 40But this not yet, but afterwards was done.
For Hector had the Greeks with show’rs of spears
Constrain’d to quit their walls and tow’rs so high,
That rattled terribly about their ears,
And back unto their hollow ships to fly.
Hobbes1839: 45As when a lion or a boar beset
With hounds and hunters, this and that way tries
(Close as they stand) through them by strength to get,
And passing on their spears prevails or dies,
And as he goes still makes them to give way;
Hobbes1839: 50So Hector ’mongst his friends went here and there,
Exhorting them the trenches to assay.
The horses when upon the brink they were
Boggled and whinnied, and refus’d to pass;
For broad it was and not to be leap’d o’er:
Hobbes1839: 55And to descend into, too deep it was,
And on each side bristled with stakes good store,
Fix’d by the Achæans to keep off the foe;
So that for horse and cars there was no way.
But very willing were the foot to go,
[137]
Hobbes1839: 60And only to receive command did stay.
And then to Hector said Polydamas,
Hector and you, the princes of our friends,
We strive in vain to make our horses pass
O’er such great stakes, so sharpen’d at the ends,
Hobbes1839: 65Having above our heads the enemy.
Where (though we could get down) we cannot fight,
Though Jove unto our side inclined be,
And to the Greeks should bear as much despite,
As I, that wish their name were rooted out.
Hobbes1839: 70Yet if the Greeks, when we encumber’d were
For want of room, should turn and face about,
And set upon us in the ditch, I fear
A man of us would not be left alive
To tell at Troy what is become of us.
Hobbes1839: 75But if you mean to have the bus’ness thrive,
Then hear my counsel, Let us all do thus:
Till of our horse and chariots we have need
Let servants hold them to the trenches nigh,
And we on foot fight; for if Jove indeed
Hobbes1839: 80Intend us victory, the Greeks will fly.
Thus he advis’d; and Hector thought it best,
And from his chariot leap’d unto the sand,
Arm’d as he was; and so did all the rest,
And to their charioteers they gave command
Hobbes1839: 85All in their order near the trench to stand.
The Trojans in five parts themselves divide;
And Hector of the first took the command.
But with himself he joined two beside,
Polydamas and stout Cebriones,
Hobbes1839: 90And left a meaner man to hold his car.
Of all the Trojan host the best were these.
O’ th’ second party Paris had the care,
Join’d with Agenor and Alcathous.
The third commanded was by leaders three:
Hobbes1839: 95First Helenus, and then Deiphobus,
The third was Asius. From Arisbe he
With mighty horses, colour’d like to flame,
Bred on the bank of Sellis, came to Troy.
The fourth command unto Æneas came;
Hobbes1839: 100And he likewise two seconds had, and they
Two sons were of Antenor (both well skill’d
In war), Archelochus and Acamas.
Lastly, Sarpedon led into the field
The Trojan aids; and he assisted was
Hobbes1839: 105By valiant Glaucus and Asterapæus.
For of the Lycians which he led thither
The ablest and the best men he thought these.
And then with bucklers joined close together,
Away they march directly to the foe,
[138]
Hobbes1839: 110And to the combat had a great desire.
The Greeks (they thought) as fast as they could go,
Would presently unto their ships retire,
But Asius would not his horses leave
And man, without the trench, as others did.
Hobbes1839: 115Fool as he was himself so to deceive.
Upon his chariot tow’rds the ships he rid;
But never came triumphant back again
For all his flaming horses and his car,
But by Idomeneus’ spear was slain.
Hobbes1839: 120When Hector to the ships had brought the war,
The Greeks had in their wall a gate, whereat
Their horses to the field were us’d to pass,
And Asius with his chariot drave to that,
Which now left open by the Argives was,
Hobbes1839: 125Their people chas’d by Hector to let in.
And all his party with a mighty cry
March’d after him, as if they sure had been
The Argives to their hollow ships would fly;
But were deceived. For at the gate they found
Hobbes1839: 130Two mighty men that like two great oaks stood
With deep and large roots fixed in the ground,
That many winds and storms had long withstood.
And Lapiths they were both; Leontes one,
The other Polypœtes gotten by
Hobbes1839: 135Pirithous. Both saw them coming on,
And staying, on their hands and strength rely.
The Trojans led by Asius came on
With mighty noise, Orestes, Adamas,
(This Adamas of Asius was the son)
Hobbes1839: 140Thoon, Iamenus, and Œnomaus,
And o’er their heads they held their shields on high,
For fear of stones and spears from off the wall.
The Greeks within to one another cry
To save the ships, the tents, themselves, and all.
Hobbes1839: 145But when they saw the Trojans went about
To scale the wall, they roar’d and frighted were;
But the two Lapiths presently leap’d out,
And furiously fell on the Trojans there.
As if two boars the men and hounds withstood,
Hobbes1839: 150You’d often hear the boughs before them snap,
While with their bended necks they tear the wood;
So thick they did the Trojan armours rap.
For valiantly they fought, in part relying
Upon their strength, and partly on the showers
Hobbes1839: 155Of mighty stones perpetually flying
Upon the Trojans from the wall and tow’rs.
As thick as to the ground fall flakes of snow,
When by a cold wind stirred is the cloud,
Their weapons from their hands on both sides go,
[139]
Hobbes1839: 160And shields and helmets crack apace and loud.
But Asius at this vex’d to the heart,
Then spake to Jove, and clapping of his thigh,
Aye me, said he, thou too a liar art,
That mad’st us to believe the Greeks would fly;
Hobbes1839: 165Who like so many motly wasps or bees
That in the hollow way their houses build,
And for their young resist their enemies,
Till they repel them or themselves be kill’d,
Still sharply fight and will not quit the place.
Hobbes1839: 170Thus Asius said, but Jove unmoved sate,
And none that day but Hector meant to grace.
And as at this they fought at ev’ry gate,
I cannot like a God relate it all,
The flaming stones that from the Trojans flew
Hobbes1839: 175With fire divine up to the Argive wall
On ev’ry side. How th’ Argives no way knew
To save themselves but for the ships to fight;
And how the Gods that with the Greeks took part
Sat discontent in heav’n, and full of spite,
Hobbes1839: 180To see Jove so severely make them smart.
But for the fight without, ’twas first begun
By the bold Lapiths, though but two they were.
For Polypœtes, Pirithous’ son,
At Damasus threw first a heavy spear,
Hobbes1839: 185And through his helmet’s brazen cheeks it went,
And through the bone into the brain went on;
And when unto the shades he him had sent,
He killed Orminus and Pyloon:
And then a deadly spear Leontes threw,
Hobbes1839: 190Which through the body pierc’d Hippolochus.
And on Antiphates his sword he drew
And killed him, and then Iamenus,
Orestes, Menon, one upon another.
But whilst they stay’d to strip these and the rest,
Hobbes1839: 195Hector, Polydamas, and many other,
That of the Trojan army were the best,
Were at the trench, and stood upon the brink
The wall to break, and set the ships on fire.
But as they stood a little while to think,
Hobbes1839: 200There came a bird not suiting their desire.
An eagle in his pounces held a snake,
And over Hector’s soldiers carried it
Alive, but that could yet resistance make,
And by and by the snake the eagle bit.
Hobbes1839: 205The eagle smarting cried and flew away,
And ’mongst the Trojans lets the serpent fall,
And there amazed they, and gaping stay
To see Jove’s prodigy before them crawl.
O Hector, said Polydamas, though you
[140]
Hobbes1839: 210In courts and councils cross whate’er I say,
How good soe’er it for you be and true,
Unless in ev’ry thing I go your way,
(Which is not well done, for your counsel ought
In peace and war to have their voices free,
Hobbes1839: 215And never give advice against their thought,
But always for the public good to be);
Yet now I’ll tell you, if this bird be sent
Unto the Trojans as a prodigy,
’Tis not uneasy to foresee th’ event.
Hobbes1839: 220For this I think the end of it will be:
As th’ eagle in his pounces bore the snake,
But could not to her young ones bear it home;
So if the Trojans this attempt shall make,
They’ll back unto the city smarting come,
Hobbes1839: 225And many good companions leave behind,
Whom th’ Argives, to defend their ships, will kill.
And this, I think, will any augur find
That in’s profession has any skill.
Then Hector sourly looking thus replied:
Hobbes1839: 230Polydamas, this counsel I like not;
You have a better which you from me hide.
But if indeed it be your very thought,
The Gods have sure depriv’d you of your sense,
That bids me not on Jove to set my rest,
Hobbes1839: 235But feather’d fowls, that fly I care not whence,
Nor whither, right or left, or east or west;
But we to Jove, the greatest God, will trust,
That all the other Gods excels in might.
He one bird has, that still observe we must,
Hobbes1839: 240And that is, for our country well to fight.
But why are you so much afraid? For though
You ne’er so many see before you slain,
You of yourself will have a care I know,
And not adventure where you may abstain.
Hobbes1839: 245But if you stay or counsel other men
To stay behind, my spear shall strike you dead.
This said, he led them further on; and then
They all with mighty clamour followed.
And Jove a mighty wind from Ida sent,
Hobbes1839: 250Which to the ships directly blew the dust,
That to the Trojans gave encouragement,
But to the Argives horror and distrust.
Encourag’d thus, unto the wall they go
And brake down battlements, and posts pluck’d out,
Hobbes1839: 255And piles that had been planted by the foe,
With levers strong they wring up by the root.
Thus at the wall the Trojans laboured,
And hope they had the same to overthrow.
Before the battlements the Argives spread
[141]
Hobbes1839: 260Cow-hides, and thence threw stones on them below.
The Ajaxes then ran from tow’r to tow’r,
Endeavouring to give the Argives heart,
Some with sweet words, and some of them with sour,
According as they each one did his part.
Hobbes1839: 265Fellows, said they, you that excel in war,
And you that great strength have, and you that small
(For well you know, all men not equal are)
Now play the men, there’s bus’ness for you all.
Fear not the clamour of this threat’ning man;
Hobbes1839: 270Endure this brunt, which if you overcome,
As (if Jove hinder not) I know you can,
We’ll course him to the gates of Ilium.
Thus they encouraged the Greeks. And now,
As when great Jove to show his armory
Hobbes1839: 275Upon a winter’s day sends down his snow,
Innumerable are the flakes that fly
And cover hills, and woods, and pastures green,
And all the fruitful works of husbandry,
And cover would, but that the sea comes in,
Hobbes1839: 280Both ports and shores; for there snow cannot lie;
The wall with stones resounded round about,
Yet Hector ne’er had broken wall nor gate,
But by the Greeks had still been kept without,
Had not Jove sent, the Trojans t’ animate,
Hobbes1839: 285His son Sarpedon. With his shield of brass,
Lined with many folds of strong cow-hide,
And which with golden circles strength’ned was,
And two spears in his hand, to th’ wall he hied.
And as a lion that had fasted long
Hobbes1839: 290Comes from the hill upon a flock of sheep,
Will try what he can do, for all the throng
Of men and dogs that them are set to keep;
So boldly goes Sarpedon to the walls,
With mighty hand the battlements to tear,
Hobbes1839: 295And as he going was to Glaucus calls.
Glaucus, said he, what cause think you is there
That we in Lycia more honour’d are
Than other men, and look’d upon like Gods,
And higher sit at feasts, and better fare,
Hobbes1839: 300And drink best wine, and more land have by odds?
Is’t not because we foremost are in fight!
’Tis not in vain, they’ll say, our princes have
More honour, since they are of greater might,
And their lives venture other men to save.
Hobbes1839: 305Glaucus, if we could death eschew and age
By running from the battle cowardly,
D’ye think I foremost would myself engage,
Or ever counsel you to follow me?
You know the ways to death are infinite.
[142]
Hobbes1839: 310Though we ne’er fight we cannot always live.
Therefore come on, and let us bravely fight,
And either honour gain, or honour give.
So said Sarpedon. Glaucus him obey’d;
And tow’rds the Greeks well followed they went.
Hobbes1839: 315Then Mnesteus was terribly afraid,
For to assault his tower he saw them bent,
And look’d about what heroes he could spy
On other towers unto his aid to call.
He saw th’ Ajaxes two, and Teucer by,
Hobbes1839: 320But too far off to hear. For at the wall
Of shields and helmets so great thumping was,
That ’twas impossible to hear him call.
The gates resounded no less than the brass;
For fiercely they were fighting at ’em all.
Hobbes1839: 325Then Mnesteus to the squire, Thootes, said,
Run quickly, call the Ajaxes to me,
Both, if they can be spar’d. I am afraid
Against these men I shall not able be
To keep my place. Keen warriors they are.
Hobbes1839: 330But if they be themselves distressed there,
Let Telamonius of the place take care,
And Teucer use his bow and arrows here.
Thootes then unto th’ Ajaxes ran
Along the Argive wall, and to them said,
Hobbes1839: 335Mnesteus entreats both of you, if you can,
To come unto his tow’r and give him aid.
Keen warriors, he says, these Lycians are:
But if you be yourselves distressed here,
Let Telamonius of the place take care,
Hobbes1839: 340And Teucer use his bow and arrows there.
This said, great Ajax said unto the less,
Æliades, stay here awhile, till I
Deliver Mnesteus from his distress.
That done, I shall be with you presently.
Hobbes1839: 345Ajax and Teucer then together go
Unto the tow’r of Mnesteus with all speed,
Pandion with them, carry’ng Teucer’s bow,
And at their coming found him in great need.
The Lycians, like a black and low’ring cloud,
Hobbes1839: 350Ascended to the wall, and fiercely fought.
The Greeks resist. The noise is mighty loud.
And with a heavy stone stood Ajax out,
That two men scarce could carry, such as now
The earth brings forth, and with the same he stroke
Hobbes1839: 355Epicles on the helmet such a blow
As head and helmet both in pieces broke.
Down like a diver from the wall fell he
Headlong, and dead upon the ground he lay.
At Glaucus Teucer lets an arrow flee
[143]
Hobbes1839: 360Which through his arm unarmed made its way.
Glaucus, no longer able now to fight,
Leapt from the wall unseen unto the ground,
For fear, if of his hurt they had a sight,
The Greeks would make a triumph of his wound.
Hobbes1839: 365Griev’d was Sarpedon to see Glaucus gone,
But not so grieved but that still he fought,
And fix’d a heavy spear in Alcmaon,
And with the same his life and all pluck’d out.
Sarpedon then tore down a battlement,
Hobbes1839: 370And wider for the Lycians made the way.
But Teucer then an arrow to him sent;
But Jupiter, to save his son that day,
The shaft unto his shield and belt directed,
So that it passed not unto the skin,
Hobbes1839: 375The shield and belt together him protected.
And then, with spear in hand came Ajax in,
And with a push that pierc’d his shield clean through,
His coming on a little while he staid.
But with Sarpedon that could little do,
Hobbes1839: 380That honour sought. Then to his friends he said,
Ye Lycians, what makes ye thus remiss?
Can I make way unto the ships alone?
Strong as I am, impossible it is.
For many hands much better are than one.
Hobbes1839: 385This said, the Lycians heavier than before,
To please their prince, upon the Argives lay.
The Greeks within their broken ranks restore,
And terrible the battle was that day.
For neither could the Lycians passage make
Hobbes1839: 390Unto the ships and break the Argives’ wall,
Nor Greeks compel the Lycians to forsake
The battlements, so fiercely fought they all.
As two men on the confines of their ground
At two ends of a measure tugging stand,
Hobbes1839: 395Contending earnestly about their bound,
And each of them would fain enlarge his land:
So for the battlement they striving stood,
And wounded one another back and breast,
And sprinkled was the battlement with blood,
Hobbes1839: 400Nor was it certain yet who had the best.
But as a woman that is fain to spin,
To find herself and children sorry food,
In one scale wool, in th’ other weight puts in
Till they hang ev’n: so ev’n the battle stood
Hobbes1839: 405Till Hector came, to whom Jove chiefly meant
To give the honour of the victory.
Then Hector up the wall the foremost went,
And thence unto his Trojans loud did cry,
Trojans, come on, and break me down this wall,
[144]
Hobbes1839: 410And set the Argives’ hollow ships on flame.
This said, he heard was by the Trojans all,
And straight unto the battlements they came.
Then Hector at the gate took up a stone,
Great and sharp pointed, two men such as now
Hobbes1839: 415Could scarce have lifted up so great a one:
But Hector with one hand the same could throw;
For Jupiter to him had made it light.
And as unto a shepherd is a fleece
Of wool, that to be borne needs little might;
Hobbes1839: 420So eas’ly borne the stone by Hector is;
And standing at the gate well fortified
With planks well join’d, and two cross-bars within,
And taking with his right foot back a stride,
Out flew the stone, and at the gate went in.
Hobbes1839: 425The gate then roar’d; the hinges broken were;
The bars upon the ground asunder lay;
And pieces of the planks flew here and there;
And to the ships now open was the way.
And Hector with a countenance like night
Hobbes1839: 430Flew in. And fire appeared in his eyes:
His armour as he marched shining bright,
And light reflected up unto the skies;
And two good spears he grasped in his fist.
And then the Greeks were mightily afraid;
Hobbes1839: 435For none except a God could him resist.
And then unto the Trojans turning said,
Now Trojans to the wall. And presently
Great numbers of the Trojans that way pass,
And others at the gate. The Argives fly
Unto their ships. And great the tumult was.