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Index:The Confidence Man.djvu

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The Confidence Man.djvu

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-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Title Publishers Contents1 Contents2 Contents3 Contents4 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085 086 087 088 089 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CONTENTS.




CHAPTER I.

A mute goes aboard a boat on the Mississippi.

CHAPTER II.

Showing that many men have many minds.

CHAPTER III.

In which a variety of characters appear.

CHAPTER IV.

Renewal of old acquaintance.

CHAPTER V.

The man with the weed makes it an even question whether he be a great sage or a great simpleton.

CHAPTER VI.

At the outset of which certain passengers prove deaf to the call of charity.

CHAPTER VII.

A gentleman with gold sleeve-buttons.

CHAPTER VIII.

A charitable lady.

CHAPTER IX.

Two business men transact a little business.

CHAPTER X.

In the cabin.

CHAPTER XI.

Only a page or so.

CHAPTER XII.

The story of the unfortunate man, from which may be gathered whether or no he has been justly so entitled.

CHAPTER XIII.

The man with the traveling-cap evinces much humanity, and in a way which would seem to show him to be one of the most logical of optimists.

CHAPTER XIV.

Worth the consideration of those to whom it may prove worth considering.

CHAPTER XV.

An old miser, upon suitable representations, is prevailed upon to venture an investment.

CHAPTER XVI.

A sick man, after some impatience, is induced to become a patient.

CHAPTER XVII.

Towards the end of which the Herb-Doctor proves himself a forgiver of injuries.

CHAPTER XVIII.

Inquest into the true character of the Herb-Doctor.

CHAPTER XIX.

A soldier of fortune.

CHAPTER XX.

Reappearance of one who may be remembered.

CHAPTER XXI.

A hard case.

CHAPTER XXII.

In the polite spirit of the Tusculan disputations.

CHAPTER XXIII.

In which the powerful effect of natural scenery is evinced in the case of the Missourian, who, in view of the region round about Cairo, has a return of his chilly fit.

CHAPTER XXIV.

A philanthropist undertakes to convert a misanthrope, but does not get beyond confuting him.

CHAPTER XXV.

The Cosmopolitan makes an acquaintance.

CHAPTER XXVI.

Containing the metaphysics of Indian-hating, according to the views of one evidently as prepossessed as Rousseau in favor of savages.

CHAPTER XXVII.

Some account of a man of questionable morality, but who, nevertheless, would seem entitled to the esteem of that eminent English moralist who said he liked a good hater.

CHAPTER XXVIII.

Moot points touching the late Colonel John Moredock.

CHAPTER XXIX.

The boon companions.

CHAPTER XXX.

Opening with a poetical eulogy of the Press, and continuing with talk inspired by the same.

CHAPTER XXXI.

A metamorphosis more surprising than any in Ovid.

CHAPTER XXXII.

Showing that the age of music and magicians is not yet over.

CHAPTER XXXIII.

Which may pass for whatever it may prove to be worth.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

In which the Cosmopolitan tells the story of the gentleman-madman.

CHAPTER XXXV.

In which the Cosmopolitan strikingly evinces the artlessness of his nature.

CHAPTER XXXVI.

In which the Cosmopolitan is accosted by a mystic, whereupon ensues pretty much such talk as might be expected.

CHAPTER XXXVII.

The mystical master introduces the practical disciple.

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

The disciple unbends, and consents to act a social part.

CHAPTER XXXIX.

The hypothetical friends.

CHAPTER XL.

In which the story of China Aster is, at second-hand, told by one who, while not disapproving the moral, disclaims the spirit of the style.

CHAPTER XLI.

Ending with a rupture of the hypothesis.

CHAPTER XLII.

Upon the heel of the last scene, the Cosmopolitan enters the barber's shop, a benediction on his lips.

CHAPTER XLIII.

Very charming.

CHAPTER XLIV.

In which the last three words of the last chapter are made the text of the discourse, which will be sure of receiving more or less attention from those readers who do not skip it.

CHAPTER XLV.

The Cosmopolitan increases in seriousness.