Inter-Allied Statement on the Principles of the Atlantic Charter

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Inter-Allied Statement on the Principles of the Atlantic Charter  (1941) 

A resolution following the Second Inter-Allied Meeting at St. James's Palace, in London. Attending the conference were representatives of the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the Free French, and eight governments in exile of countries under Axis occupation. The Allies agreed to adhere to the principles of the Atlantic Charter drawn up by Roosevelt and Churchill the previous month.
Reference: United Nations Documents, 1941—1945 (second ed.), London: Royal Institute of International Affairs, September 24, 1941 (published September 1946), pp. 10—11, <https://archive.org/details/unitednationsdoc031889mbp>. Retrieved on 

INTER-ALLIED MEETING

Held in London at St James's Palace on September 24, 1941

RESOLUTION

The Governments of Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Yugoslavia, and the representatives of General de Gaulle, leader of Free Frenchmen,

Having taken note of the Declaration recently drawn up by the President of the United States and by the Prime Minister, Mr Churchill, on behalf of His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom,

Now make known their adherence to the common principles of policy set forth in that Declaration and their intention to cooperate to the best of their ability in giving effect to them.


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