Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/302

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283
CONFEDERATE MILITARY HISTORY.

No. 59—(870) April 30, 1864, in Morgan's brigade, General Wheeler's corps.

No. 73—(819-822) Mentioned by Colonel Minty (Union), in fight at McAfee's, June 11th, and near Noonday creek, Ga., June 21, 1864.

No. 74—(642) April 30, 1864, under Col. M. L. Kirkpatrick, in General Morgan's brigade, Wheeler's corps. (650-673) In General Allen's brigade, General Wheeler's corps, Atlanta campaign, June to August.

No. 78—(856) September 20, 1864, in Allen's brigade, Wheeler's corps.

No. 99–(352), Mentioned by Gen. J. Kilpatrick, Williston, S. C., February 8, 1865, on road to Augusta. (1071) January 31, 1865, Colonel Hagan's brigade, General Wheeler's corps.

THE FIFTY-THIRD ALABAMA CAVALRY.

The Fifty-third regiment of mounted infantry was organized in the fall of 1862, by the addition of several companies to Maj. T. F. Jenkins' battalion, which had already rendered gallant service at Shiloh. Major Jenkins and Captain Cox commanded mounted companies in the Seventh Alabama prior to April, 1862. The regiment was first placed in Roddey's brigade, and fought at Thompson's Station, Brentwood, Town Creek and in the pursuit of Streight. It was on picket duty at Dalton in April, 1864. When Roddey's brigade was transferred to General Polk's department, this regiment was detached and was brigaded under General Hannon, and afterward General Hagan, in General Wheeler's cavalry corps, and took part in the perilous fighting all the way from Dalton to Atlanta. It participated in the daring raid of 1864 in Sherman's rear, and captured 100 men and 1,500 beef cattle; it fought at Jonesboro and Resaca, and continued to harass the Federals in the Carolinas.

Its first colonel, M. W. Hannon, was early promoted to the command of a brigade. Lieut.-Col. J. F. Gaines, who succeeded in command, was wounded at Waynesboro. Major Jenkins and Capt. L. E. Locke were captured near Florence, and Capt. W. R. Davis near Rome.