Page:Folk-lore - A Quarterly Review. Volume 16, 1905.djvu/509

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Collectanea. 451

Tri casan agus broUean agus piese de 'n maodhel,

'S tha theid mi laidh 'noch gus a faigh mi rudeigein."

(" I will not go to bed to-night till I get something, / something, something / (repeat).

I will not go lying (down) till I get three sheeps' trotters, / Three feet, three feet, three sheep's feet, / Three feet and a breast, three sheep's feet. / Three feet and a breast and a piece of the paunch, / And I shall not go to bed to-night till I get something.")

" Huil o mo chuillin min

Thall 's a bhos mo chuillin min

I o mo chuillin min

Huil o mo chuillin meanbh.

" I o mo chuillin chuillin I o mo chuillin chuillin Eh o mo chuillin chuillin Thall 's a bhos mo chuillin meanbh."

(" Hullo my smooth doggie / Here and there my smooth doggie / I o mo my smooth doggie / Hullo my little doggie. I o my doggie doggie / I o ray doggie doggie / A o my doggie doggie / Here and there my little doggie.")

" Cas a Moch a Lurie A Lurie, a Laurie Cas a Moch a Lurie, Air uriar aig mAicheall. (m'aithail)

" Chuirin ann a craidhail e Shuidhin ann a chuiridh air 'S iomadh te bidh airiedh Na laidh le a fein thu."

The contributor who sent this seems to think that " Moch " has some connection with mogan a ' hussion,' a stocking leg. He translates it " The foot of Moch a Lurie / A lurie, a Laurie / The foot of Moch a Lurie / On the floor of my dearie. / I would put him in a cradle / I would sit down to wait on him / Many a woman would be glad / To own you herself" The literal trans- lation of the last two lines seems to be " Many a woman will be worthy / You lying with herself."