Page:IJAL vol 1.djvu/220

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212

��INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AMERICAN LINGUISTICS

��VOL. I

��same, until all were sick. Then the father said, "Your younger brother is a great magi- cian. Do not seek his life, for he will over- come you." Despite this, they sought his life, because they were jealous. "Let us play the dish-game!" They brought a dish of stone, a big magic dish. Said Gluska'be, "Now, let us begin for I am fond of playing." They began playing. The oldest brother threw first, and won many counters. Then Gluskp'be threw once, and broke the dish to pieces. He gave a great laugh, and said, "Oh! it breaks easily. Let us try my dish!" Then he produced his dish, a small one of ivory. The oldest brother smiled. Gluskp'be threw, and won many counters. The oldest brother thought, "At once I shall break it in pieces when I throw." But when he tried, he could not lift it; his finger-nails only slipped on it. He was beaten. "I am not able to raise the dish, brother. You have won."

��12. GLUSKA'BE STEALS SUMMER FOR THE

PEOPLE,' ESCAPES FROM THE CROWS,

AND OVERCOMES WINTER

udlo"san eda'lgamuk' nodjr'wr'dagan He went to where they were dancing to dance* with them.

M.uiitt be'djo'set una^'mrhan

When there he arrived, he saw

pma'uzowr'n'owa' peba'mi krgi'm'don'- living people going about in groups talking*

ka'hadr'djik na'tc ne - 'gama

low. Then also he

uda'si-'djo'san uda'gwedjo'damu'kan dan edged up. He inquired, "What

mi-'na ali-'dabr'le ke-'gwus ali'"ta7)gwat next has occurred, what is being done?"

ma'nit'e pe - 'sagoal udr'fogul tca'stci' 1 * Then one of them told him, "Tca's-tci-l 1

ki - abe"t eli'gra' gwe'we'ldaman e'ltaTjgwa'k you the likes of you. You know what is going on!"

1 Accompanied by an insulting gesture, spreading the knuckles of the first two fingers and pointing toward him, a most insulting exclamation and motion.

��na'na a'tc ne'gama Gluska'be udr'lal Then also he Gluskp'be said to him,

ki-a'ga"tc tca's-tcr' oma'nr'ta'nenan "You yourself tca's-tci'l" He twisted his nose off (with his fingers),

nobi-'di'gan eda'lgamuk' nowr'dagan then he went in where they were dancing, then he danced,

wi-wunage"ta'wawal ni- 'banal teba'bo round about they danced (circling) summer a fluid

��ktci-'p'kan-a-'djo 2 ni-'yu in a big bark receptacle. 1 Here

��nr'swak two

��na'j/kskwak young girls

��ba-'magat were dancing

wulr'gowak handsome.

��ugalo'lan nda"tama uda'si'de'magowi'a' He spoke to them, not they answered him,

e'bagwa'tc awr'kwi-'naTjgu amo'skwHa'- on account of it they made fun of him. He*

ohogo ne'bagwatc wza'mi p'skwa'nenan became angry. Then on account of it, because he* stroked them on the back,

ne'lami wi'wuna'gaha'dit pe^'sagwada while they circled around, at once

gi'z madje' pi'lwrna'g w zuwak me"soma already they began to look strange before

mi-'na wi'wuna'gaha'dik'" ndala'oga'na again they circled about they could not dance.

��e'laboldi'hidit Looking on

��a'lnpbak una - 'mi'hana. the people saw

��ni-'swa' ma'skak e'bi'r'djik no'noda"kana two toads sitting. Then they threw them out.

ma'lhi'dahasu'ldowak e - 'li - ma'skaitahadit They wondered at how they turned into toads

na^kskwak ke'nuk pe-'sagwun e'lgaha'dit the girls, but still kept dancing

wzam medji-'mi tcuwi' 1 wi'wuna'ge'ta'wa because always must surround

ni-'ban we'dji'tc a'nda a'wen gi-'zi-- summer so that no one could*

2 Birch-bark vessels of at least eight different styles were used for storage and culinary purposes.

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