Page:Philosophy of bhagawad-gita.pdf/20

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xvi

was critical, and his quotations in conversation from them were apt and forcible. For example, one afternoon, after tennis was over, some question arose about the nature of Atman. Subba Row cited at once the passage in the Mandukya Upanishat explaining what Atman was. This Upanishat was a favourite authority with him, and the four-fold division which he laid stress upon in his Gita lectures was the one explained in this Upanishat. He spoke very highly of Gaudapada's Karika on this Upanishat, and he thought there was but one other writer who could at all come up to the standard of Gaudapada, and that was Plato. In the course of a casual conversation in which some point arose connected with Buddhist philosophy, Subba Row referred to this verse in this Karika where the term Adi Buddha occurs. It was Subba Row's high opinion of this Karika that led me to employ Mani Lal Dvivedi to publish an English translation of the Karika with Shankara's Commentary.

Subba Row's acquaintance with Mantra Shastra, theoretical and practical, was apparently profound. It was he who taught Bhavani the Gopala Mantram. Others had also obtained from him instructions regarding the use of some great Mantras. One or two instances showed he knew how to invoke elementals, in order to produce phenomena.

I forgot to mention that Subba Row's death was most untimely. He was, I think, only about