Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 41.djvu/776

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been validated.
756
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.

Thus, we have all kinds of "national dances," so called. Oddly enough, the national dance of Hungary sets forth the drama of courtship—the shy advance, the maidenly modesty and retreat, the proposal, the rejection, but finally the open-armed acceptance. (See illustration.)

Finally, dancing follows a general law of mental evolution, namely, that practices which occupy an important place in the minds and daily doings of people in a savage stage of culture survive only as matters of amusement, or perhaps of aesthetic feeling, in a period of civilization. And such is now the place occupied by the eldest of the arts. When we regard the pavan, the gavotte, the minuet, the Sir Roger de Coverley, or the waltz, we may see in them the survivals of that primitive impulse which we often fail to recognize in camp-meetings and church "revivals."

 

THE NATIVE AND FOREIGN-BORN POPULATION.

VIII. LESSONS FROM THE CENSUS.

By CARROLL D. WRIGHT, A. M.,

UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER OF LABOR.

THE native and foreign-born population of the United States has been given to the public in Census Bulletin No. 194. The designations of the foreign-born as to countries from which they came are not included in the bulletin. It is impossible, therefore, to consider any question beyond that of the distinction between native and foreign-born, with the addition of immediate parent nativity.

Native and Foreign-born Population, 1890.

PSM V41 D776 Native and foreign born population by state.png