Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/547

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509
PARISINA.

Or thought how brief such moments last?
But yet—they are already past!
Alas! we must awake before
We know such vision comes no more.


IV.

With many a lingering look they leave
The spot of guilty gladness past:50
And though they hope, and vow, they grieve,
As if that parting were the last.
The frequent sigh—the long embrace—
The lip that there would cling for ever,
While gleams on Parisina's face
The Heaven she fears will not forgive her,
As if each calmly conscious star
Beheld her frailty from afar—
The frequent sigh, the long embrace,
Yet binds them to their trysting-place.60
But it must come, and they must part
In fearful heaviness of heart,
With all the deep and shuddering chill
Which follows fast the deeds of ill.


V.

And Hugo is gone to his lonely bed,
To covet there another's bride;
But she must lay her conscious head
A husband's trusting heart beside.
But fevered in her sleep she seems,
And red her cheek with troubled dreams,70
And mutters she in her unrest

A name she dare not breathe by day,[1]
  1. [Leigh Hunt, in his Autobiography (1860, p. 252), says, "I had the pleasure of supplying my friendly critic, Lord Byron, with a point for his Parisina (the incident of the heroine talking in her sleep)."