Page:The despatches of Hernando Cortes.djvu/401

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page needs to be proofread.


CONQUEST OF MEXICO. 379 ness ; but if unsuccessful, to make war upon them. He proceeded thither, and had several encounters with the enemy ; but on account of the rough nature of the coun- try he was unable to subdue the whole. I had also ordered him in my instructions to go to the city of Zaca- tula, and with what force he had, and such additional strength as he could raise, to march to the province of Coliman, where, as I have already related, the people had defeated a captain and his party, who had gone from the province of Mechuacan to that city ; and that he should endeavor to draw them by friendly means, and if these were insufficient, to conquer them. He accordingly went thither, and the force he carried with what he took on the way amounted to fifty horse, and one hundred and fifty foot. He visited the province con- taining the city of Zacatula, on the coast of the South Sea, sixty leagues below ; on his route to the province he established peace amongst some hostile towns. When he reached the quarter where tht other captain had been defeated, he found many warriors collected, expecting his arrival, and thinking to have the same success with him as the former ; and thus they met. But it pleased our Lord that our people should gain the victory without the loss of a single man, although many were wounded, both men and horses ; and the enemy paid dearly for the mischief they had committed. This chastisement had a good effect, as without further hostilities peace was restored to the whole country ; and not only this province, but many others adjoining it, offered them- selves as vassals of your imperial Majesty, namely, Aliman, Colimonte, and Ceguatan. He wrote me from thence an account of all that had occurred ; and I sent him directions to seek a good site on which he should