Page:US Senate Report on CIA Detention Interrogation Program.pdf/25

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1 As measured by the number of disseminated intelligence reports. Therefore, zero intelligence reports were disseminated based on information provided by seven of the 39 detainees known to have been subjected to the CIA's enhanced interrogation techniques.

2 May 30, 2005, Memorandum for John A. Rizzo, Senior Deputy General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency, from Steven G. Bradbury, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Office of Legal Counsel, Department of Justice, re; Application of United States Obligations Under Article 16 of the Convention Against Torture to Certain Techniques that May Be Used in the Interrogation of High Value al Qaeda Detainees.

3 Transcript of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence briefing, September 6, 2006.

4 This episode was not described in CIA cables, but was described in internal emails sent by personnel in the CIA Office of Medical Services and the CIA Office of General Counsel. A review of the videotapes of the interrogations of Abu Zubaydah by the CIA Office of Inspector General (OIG) did not note the incident. A review of the catalog of videotapes, however, found that recordings of a 21-hour period, which included two waterboarding sessions, were missing.

5 April 10, 2003, email from  ; to  ; cc:  ; re More. Throughout the Committee Study, last names in all capitalized letters are pseudonyms.

6 ALEC   (182321Z JUL 02)

7 At the time, confining a detainee in a box with the dimensions of a coffin was an approved CIA enhanced interrogation technique.

8 [REDACTED] 1324 (161750Z SEP 03), referring to Hambali.

9 Interview of  , by [REDACTED] and [REDACTED], Office of the Inspector General, June 17, 2003

10 In one case, interrogators informed a detainee that he could earn a bucket if he cooperated."

11 Interview Report, 2003-7123-IG, Review of Interrogations for Counterterrorism Purposes,  , April 7, 2003, p. 12.

12 Interview Report, 2003-7123-IG, Review of Interrogations for Counterterrorism Purposes,  , May 8, 2003, p. 9.

13 November 26, 2001, Draft of Legal Appendix, Paragraph 5, "Hostile Interrogations: Legal Considerations for CIA Officers," at 1.

14 May 30, 2005, Memorandum for John A. Rizzo, Senior Deputy General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency, from Steven G. Bradbury, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Office of Legal Counsel, Department of Justice, re: Application of United States Obligations Under Article 16 of the Convention Against Torture to Certain Techniques that May Be Used in the Interrogation of High Value al Qaeda Detainees. July 20, 2007, Memorandum for John A. Rizzo, Acting General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency, from Steven G. Bradbury, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Office of Legal Counsel, Department of Justice, re: Application of War Crimes Act, the Detainee Treatment Act, and Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions to Certain Techniques that May be Used by the CIA in the Interrogation of High Value al Qaeda Detainees.

15 The CIA's June 27, 2013, Response to the Committee Study of the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program states that these limitations were dictated by the White House. The CIA's June 2013 Response then acknowledges that the CIA was "comfortable" with this decision.

16 DIRECTOR   (152227Z MAR 07)

17 The Committee's conclusion is based on CIA records, including statements from CIA Directors George Tenet and Porter Goss to the CIA inspector general, that the directors had not briefed the president on the CIA's interrogation program. According to CIA records, when briefed in April 2006, the president expressed discomfort with the "image of a detainee, chained to the ceiling, clothed in a diaper, and forced to go to the bathroom on himself." The CIA's June 2013 Response does not dispute the CIA records, but states that "[w]hile Agency records on the subject are admittedly incomplete, former President Bush has stated in his autobiography that he discussed the program, including the use of enhanced techniques, with then-DCIA Tenet in 2002, prior to application of the techniques on Abu Zubaydah, and personally approved the techniques." A memoir by former Acting CIA General Counsel John Rizzo disputes this account.

18 CIA records indicate that the CIA had not informed policymakers of the presence of CIA detention facilities in Countries  ,  ,   and  . It is less clear whether policymakers were aware of the detention facilities in Country   and at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The CIA requested that country names and information directly or indirectly

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