Page:Ulysses, 1922.djvu/243

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240
 

Benson’s ferry, and by the threemasted schooner Rosevean from Bridgewater
with bricks.

                                                  ***

       Almidano Artifoni walked past Holles street, past Sewell’s yard. Behind
him Cashel Boyle O’Connor Fitzmaurice Tisdall Farrell with stickumbrelladust-
coat dangling, shunned the lamp before Mr Law Smith’s house and, crossing,
walked along Merrion square. Distantly behind him a blind stripling tapped his
way by the wall of College Park.
       Cashel Boyle O’Connor Fitzmaurice Tisdall Farrell walked as far as
Mr Lewis Werner’s cheerful windows, then turned and strode back along
Merrion square, his stickumbrelladustcoat dangling.
       At the corner of Wilde’s he halted, frowned at Elijah’s name announced
on the Metropolitan Hall, frowned at the distant pleasance of duke’s lawn. His
eyeglass flashed frowning in the sun. With ratsteeth bared he muttered :
        Coactus volui.
       He strode on for Clare street, grinding his fierce word.
       As he strode past Mr Bloom’s dental windows the sway of his dustcoat
brushed rudely from its angle a slender tapping cane and swept onwards, having
buffeted a thewless body. The blind stripling turned his sickly face after the
striding form.
        God’s curse on you, he said sourly, whoever you are! You’re blinder
nor I am, you bitch’s bastard!

                                                  ***

       Opposite Ruggy O’Donohoe’s Master Patrick Aloysius Dignam, pawing
the pound and half of Mangan’s, late Fehrenbach’s, porksteaks he had been
sent for, went along warm Wicklow street dawdling. It was too blooming
dull sitting in the parlour with Mrs Stoer and Mrs Quigley and Mrs Mac
Dowell and the blind down and they all at their sniffles and sipping sups of the
superior tawny sherry uncle Barney brought from Tunney’s. And they eating
crumbs of the cottage fruit cake jawing the whole blooming time and sighing.
       After Wicklow lane the window of Madame Doyle, court dress milliner,
stopped him. He stood looking in at the two puckers stripped to their pelts