Page:Ulysses, 1922.djvu/687

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684
 

       Why for the observer impressionability in addition to vigour, corporal
proportion and commercial ability?
       Because he had observed with augmenting frequency in the preceding
members of the same series the same concupiscence, inflammably transmitted
first with alarm, then with understanding, then with desire, finally with
fatigue, with alternating symptoms of epicene comprehension and apprehension.

       With what antagonistic sentiments were his subsequent reflections
affected?
       Envy, jealousy, abnegation, equanimity.

       Envy?
       Of a bodily and mental male organism specially adapted for the
superincumbent posture of energetic human copulation and energetic piston
and cylinder movement necessary for the complete satisfaction of a constant
but not acute concupiscence resident in a bodily and mental female organism,
passive but not obtuse.

       Jealousy?
       Because a nature full and volatile in its free state, was alternately the
agent and reagent of attraction. Because attraction between agents and reagents
at all instants varied, with inverse proportion of increase and decrease, with
incessant circular extension and radial reentrance. Because the controlled
contemplation of the fluctuation of attraction produced, if desired, a fluctuation
of pleasure.

       Abnegation?
       In virtue of a) acquaintance initiated in September 1903 in the
establishment of George Mesias, merchant tailor and outfitter, 5 Eden Quay,
b) hospitality extended and received in kind, reciprocated and reappropriated
in person, c) comparative youth subject to impulses of ambition and
magnanimity, colleagual altruism and amorous egoism, d) extraracial attraction,
intraracial inhibition, supraracial prerogative, e) an imminent provincial musical
tour, common current expenses, net proceeds divided.

       Equanimity?
       As natural as any and every natural act of a nature expressed or
understood executed in natured nature by natural creatures in accordance with