Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 1.djvu/193

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been validated.

Allowance for attendance and travelling, after March 4, 1795.aforesaid fourth day of March, in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, each Senator shall be entitled to receive seven dollars for every day he shall attend the Senate; and shall also be allowed at the commencement and end of every such session and meeting, seven dollars for every twenty miles of the estimated distance, by the most usual road, from his place of residence to the seat of Congress; and in case any member of the Senate shall be detained by sickness, on his journey to or from any such session or meeting, or after his arrival shall be unable to attend the Senate, he shall be entitled to the same allowance of seven dollars a day: Repealed by act of 1796, ch. 4Provided always, That no Senator shall be allowed a sum exceeding the rate of seven dollars a day, from the end of one such session or meeting to the time of his taking a seat in another.

Members of the House of Representatives, their allowance for attendance and travelling.Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That at every session of Congress, each Representative shall be entitled to receive six dollars for every day he shall attend the House of Representatives; and shall also be allowed at the commencement and end of every session, six dollars for every twenty miles of the estimated distance, by the most usual road, from his place of residence to the seat of Congress; and in case any Representative shall be detained by sickness, on his journey to or from the session of Congress, or after his arrival shall be unable to attend the House of Representatives, he shall be entitled to the daily allowance aforesaid; and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to defray the incidental expenses of his office, shall be entitled to receive in addition to his compensation as a Representative, six dollars for every day he shall attend the House: Provided always, That no Representative shall be allowed a sum exceeding the rate of six dollars a day, from the end of one such session or meeting to the time of his taking a seat in another.

Chaplains, secretary, and clerks, their salaries and allowance.Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to each chaplain of Congress, at the rate of five hundred dollars per annum during the session of Congress; to the secretary of the Senate and clerk of the House of Representatives, fifteen hundred dollars per annum each, to commence from the time of their respective appointments; and also a further allowance of two dollars per day to each, during the session of that branch for which he officiates: and the said secretary and clerk shall each be allowed (when the President of the Senate or Speaker shall deem it necessary) to employ one principal clerk, who shall be paid three dollars per day, and an engrossing clerk, who shall be paid two dollars per day during the session, with the like compensation to such clerk while he shall be necessarily employed in the recess.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the following compensation shall be allowed to the officers herein after mentioned, viz:Sergeant at arms and door-keepers, their allowance for services, attendance, &c. To the sergeant at at arms, during the sessions and while employed on the business of the House, four dollars per day; the allowance of the present sergeant at arms to commence from the time of his appointment. To the door-keeper of the Senate and House of Representatives, for their services in those offices, three dollars per day during the session of the House to which he may belong, for his own services, and for the hire of necessary labourers; the allowance to the present door-keeper of the Senate to commence from the day appointed for the meeting of Congress; and the allowance to the door-keeper of the House of Representatives to commence from his appointment; and to the assistant door-keeper to each House, two dollars per day during the sessions.

Compensations, how to be certified.Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the said compensation which shall be due to the members and officers of the Senate, shall be certified by the President; and that which shall be due to the members and officers of the House of Representatives, shall be certified by the Speaker; and the same shall be passed as public accounts, and paid out of the public treasury.