Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 1.djvu/228

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been validated.

these appropriations.into effect the foregoing appropriations, for the repayment of which the aforesaid duties on imports and tonnage shall be, and are hereby pledged.

Approved, March 26, 1790.


Statute Ⅱ.



April 2, 1790.
Repealed by Act of March 2, 1799, chap. 22, sec. 93 and 112.
Chap. Ⅴ.—An Act to prevent the exportation of goods not duly inspected according to the laws of the several States.


Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the collectors and other officers of the customs in the several ports of the United States, be,Collectors, &c. not to grant clearances, until a certificate of inspection is produced. and they are hereby directed to pay due regard to the inspection laws of the states in which they may respectively act, in such manner, that no vessel having on board goods liable to inspection, shall be cleared out until the master or other proper person shall have produced such certificate, that all such goods have been duly inspected, as the laws of the respective states do or may require to be produced to collectors or other officers of the customs.[1]

Approved, April 2, 1790.


Statute Ⅱ.



April 2, 1790.
Chap. Ⅵ.—An Act to accept a cession of the claims of the state of North Carolina to a certain district of Western territory.

Recital of the deed of cession, by the senators of N. Carolina, to the United States; andA deed of cession having been executed, and in the Senate offered for acceptance to the United States, of the claims of the state of North Carolina, to a district of territory therein described; which deed is in the words following, viz.

To all who shall see these Presents
We the underwritten Samuel Johnston and Benjamin Hawkins, Senators in the Congress of the United States of America, duly and constitutionally chosen by the legislature of the State of North Carolina, send greeting.

Whereas the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, on the day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, passed an act, entituled “An act for the purpose of ceding to the United States of America, certain western lands therein described,” in the words following, to wit:

of the act of the legislature of that state, by which the execution of the said deed is authorized.Whereas the United States in Congress assembled, have repeatedly and earnestly recommended to the respective states in the Union, claiming or owning vacant western territory, to make cessions of part of the same, as a further means, as well of hastening the extinguishment of the debts, as of establishing the harmony of the United States; and the inhabitants of the said western territory being also desirous that such cession should be made, in order to obtain a more ample protection than they have heretofore received: now this state, being ever desirous of doing ample justice to the public creditors, as well as the establishing the harmony of the United States, and complying with the reasonable desires of her citizens; Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the Senators of this state, in the Congress of the United States, or one of the Senators and any two of the Representatives of this state in the Congress of the United States, are hereby authorized, empowered and required to execute a deed or deeds on the part and behalf of this state, conveying to the United States of America, all right, title


  1. The laws of the United States do not require a person, in order to entitle himself to a clearance, to produce to the collector a certificate of his having complied with the inspection laws of the State, unless the law of the State requires it. Bass et al. v. Steele, 3 Wash. C. C. R. 381.