Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 2.djvu/517

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is hereby forever vested in the corporation of the said city, so as not to affect the legal or equitable claims of any individuals, or of any body politic or corporate, if any such there be.

Interfering claims in districts east and west of Pearl river, how to be settled.Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That whenever the claims of persons having a right of pre-emption in either of the districts east or west of Pearl river, shall interfere with each other, the register and receiver of public monies are hereby authorized in their respective districts so to regulate their locations as to prevent such interference.

Approved, March 31, 1808.

Statute Ⅰ.



April 1, 1808.
[Expired.]
Chap. XLI.—An Act further to prolong the continuance of the Mint at Philadelphia.

Mint continued in Philadelphia for five years after 4th March, 1808.
1812, ch. 2.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the act, intituled “An act concerning the mint,” approved March the third, one thousand eight hundred and one, is hereby revived and continued in force and operation for the further term of five years after the fourth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and eight.

Approved, April 1, 1808.

Statute Ⅰ.



April 2, 1808.
[Obsolete.]
Chap. XLII.—An Act authorizing the sale of public Arms.

President authorized to sell to individual states public arms.
Payment of the purchase money to be first made into the treasury of the U. States.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby authorized to cause to be sold to the individual states, which may wish to purchase, any arms now owned by the United States, and which may be parted without injury to the public: Accounts of such sales shall be laid before Congress, and the money arising therefrom be, and the same is hereby appropriated, under the direction of the President of the United States, to the purchase or manufacture of other arms for the use of the United States: Provided, that such arms be not delivered to any state or their agents until the payment of the purchase money be first made into the treasury of the United States, in money or in the stock of the United States, at its value, as established by an act, intituled1806, ch. 50.An act to repeal so much of any act or acts as authorize the receipt of evidences of the public debt, in payment for the lands of the United States, and for other purposes relative to the public debt:” Provided also,Proviso. that this provision shall not extend to any purchase, not exceeding five thousand stand of arms, which shall be made by a state to which the United States by existing engagements are bound to pay a sum of money, equal to the amount of such purchase.

Approved, April 2, 1808.

Statute Ⅰ.



April 12, 1808.
[Obsolete.]
Chap. XLIII.—An Act to raise for a limited time an additional military force.[1]

Additional military force to be raised.
Term of service.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment of the United States, there be raised five regiments of infantry, one regiment of riflemen, one regiment of light artillery, and one regiment of light dragoons, to be enlisted for the term of five years, unless sooner discharged.

How the regiments are to be composed.Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the said regiments of infantry, riflemen, and artillery, shall consist of ten companies each, and

  1. See the act fixing the military peace establishment of the United States, March 3, 1815, chap. 78.