Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 20.djvu/430

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FORTY-FIFTH CONGRESS. Sess. IH. Ch. 182. 1879. 405 clerks, arranging, classifying, and preserving records of former governments, at three dollars per day each, one thousand eight hundred and seventy eight dollars; one temporary clerk, arranging, classifying, and preserving records of former governments, at one dollar and fifty cents per day, four hundred and sixty nine dollars and nfty cents; one messenger, eight hundred and forty dollars; contingent expenses, including books, stationery, printing, and miscellaneous items, two thousand seven hundred and twelve dollars and fifty cents; in all, twenty one thousand dollars. Auditor and co1nptroller’s office: Auditor and comptroller, three thou- An di for an d sand dollars; one bookeeper, one thousand eight hundred dollars; one g°ml’°’°“°"S °f‘ clerk, one thousand five hundred dollars; three clerks, at one thousand °°' four hundred dollars, four thousand two hundred dollars; one clerk, one thousand two hundred dollars; contingent expenses, including fin-- niture, books, stationery, and miscellaneous items, eight hundred and sixty dollars; one clerk, in charge of special assessment branch, two thousand one hundred and sixty dollars; two clerks, at one thousand two hundred dollars each, two thousand four hundred dollars; one clerk, at three dollars per day, nine hundred and forty dollars; two clerks, at one dollar and fifty cents per day each, nine hundred and forty dollars; in all, nineteen thousand dollars. Sinking fund office: Two clerks at one thousand two hundred dollars, Si¤ki¤g fund oftwo thousand four hundred dollars; contingent expenses, three hundred H°°· dollars; in all, two thousand seven hundred dollars. Coroner’s oince: One coroner, one thousand eight hundred dollars; Coroner’s omce contingent expenses, including books, stationery, and jury and witness fees, seven hundred dollars; in all, two thousand five hundred dollars. Collector’s office: Collector, three thousand dollars; one clerk, one Collectorsomce. thousand five hundred dollars; one clerk, one thousand two hundred dollars; one clerk, one thousand dollars, one clerk, nine hundred and sixty dollars; one clerk, at three dollars per day, nine hundred and forty dollars; one messenger, four hundred and eighty dollars; contingent expenses, including books, stationery, printing, and miscellaneous items, four thousand seven hundred and twenty dollars; in all, thirteen thousand eight hundred dollars. Attorney’s office: One attorney, four thousand dollars; one assistant A**<>*`¤€‘5"¤°m¤°- attorney, one thousand nine hundred dollars; one special assistant attorney, nine hundred and sixty dollars; one clerk, nine hundred and sixty dollars; one clerk, one hundred and ninety two dollars; contingent expenses, including books, stationery, and miscellaneous items, nine hundred and eighty eight dollars; in all, nine thousand dollars. And for the expenses of a revision of the laws of the District of Columbia, tive thousand dollars. Treasurer’s office: Treasurer and assessor, three thousand dollars; Treasur¤r’s ofone clerk, one thousand two hundred dollars; one messenger, nine hun- 6°°· dred dollars; contingent expenses, including books, stationery, car fare, and so forth, two hundred dollars; in all, five thousand three hundred dollars. Inspector’s of buildings office: One inspector, two thousand four hun- I¤§1*0$*<>¤‘ M dred dollars; one assistant inspector and draughtsman, one thousand b"‘m"‘g“ °m°°‘ seven hundred dollars; one assistant inspector, one thousand dollars; one messenger, four hundred and eighty dollars; contingent expenses, including books, stationery, and miscellaneous items, three hundred dollars; in all, five thousand eight hundred and eighty dollars. Superintendent’s of assessments and taxes office: One superintend- A¤S<>¤¤¤¤€¤* ofent, two thousand four hundred dollars; two clerks, at one thousand 6** two hundred dollars, two thousand four hundred dollars; one messenger, seven hundred and twenty dollars; contingent expenses, books, stationery, and miscellaneous items, two thousand two hundred and eighty dollars; in all, seven thousand eight hundred dollars. That from and after the passage of this act, a certain piece of prop- Edywvvd wrmpf erty situated about two and one half miles north of the Capitol, being f"""' tam'-