Page:VCH Surrey 1.djvu/372

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A HISTORY OF SURREY church in almoigne. This land belongs to (est de) the manor of AISSELE [EsherJ. There are 6 villeins with 2 ploughs. In the time of king Edward, and now, it (was and) is worth 14 shillings and 6 pence. In the same vill of AISSELA [Esher] the same William has of the Abbey of Chertsey, as (the jurors) say (die'), 3^ hides. In the time of king Edward i man and 2 women held them, and they could take what lord they pleased (quo voluerunt se vertere potuerunf) ; but for security they placed themselves with the land under the pr&tection of the Abbey. There are 2 villeins with i plough. In the time of king Edward it was worth 16 shillings, and afterwards 5 shillings ; now 10 shillings. These 5^ hides aforesaid are assessed for 5 virgates. IN COPEDORNE [COPTHORNE] HUNDRED The Abbey itself holds EVESHAM [Epsom]. 1 In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 34 hides ; now for 1 1 hides. The land is for 17 ploughs. In demesne there is i ; and (there are) 34 villeins and 4 bordars with 1 7 ploughs. There are 2 churches ; * and 6 serfs; and 2 mills worth 10 shillings ; and 24 acres of meadow. Wood worth 20 hogs. In the time of king Edward it was worth 20 pounds ; now 17 pounds. In WEBRIGE [Weybridge] s the Abbey itself hitherto has held 2 hides. Alvred held them in the time of king Edward and after his death, and could seek what lord he pleased (quolibet se vertere patuit). Then, and now, (it was and is) 2 hides. There are 3 villeins ; and 8 acres of meadow. Wood worth 2 hogs. (It was) always (worth) 20 shillings. 1 Chertsey property later.

  • In the taxation of Pope Nicholas, the

rectory of Epsom was valued at 30 marks, the vicarage at 6 marks and 20 pence. There was a Stamford Chapel, site unknown, belonging to Chertsey, which may be this second church. 8 Weybridge is now (and above, 32, a. i) in Emleybridge Hundred. It shows the char- acteristic bordar in place of cottar tenure (see 32, a. i), which belongs to Copthorne, not Emleybridge. The right of the Abbey to these hides is questioned (H. E. Af.). It seems to be implied that the land had been alienated to the Abbey since king Ed- ward's death and without king William's permission. See Introduction (jf. H. R.). In the same vill an Englishman has 2 hides of the selfsame Abbey. He held them in the time of king Edward, and could put himself and his land under what lord he pleased (cum ea quo voluit se vertere potuii], There is i plough ; and 2 villeins with half a plough ; and 8 acres of meadow. Wood worth 2 hogs. It is worth, and was worth, 20 shil- lings. p. 33b, col. ii. IN CHINGESTUN [KINGSTON] HUNDRED EDRIC holds of the selfsame Abbey half a hide which the Abbey held for 2 years before the death of king Edward. Three homagers held it of the same King previously, but they could not withdraw (therefrom) without the King's precept, because they were bedels * in Kings- ton. Then, and now, it (was and) is assessed for half a hide. The land is for 3 oxen. There are 7 oxen, with i bordar ; and 2 acres of meadow. In the time of king Edward it was worth 7 shillings ; now 8 shillings. William de Wateville holds MELDONE [Maiden] 5 of the fee (fiuo) of the Abbot. The Abbot held it in the time of king Edward. It was then assessed for 2 hides ; now for I hide less I virgate. The land is for i plough. There are 4 villeins with half a plough. It is worth, and was worth, 20 shillings. The Abbey itself holds in demesne PAT- RICESHAM [Petersham]. In the time of king Edward it was assessed for i o hides ; now for 4 hides. The land is for 5 ploughs. In demesne there is I plough ; and (there are) 15 villeins and 2 bordars with 4 ploughs. There is a church and a fishery worth 1,000 eels and 1,000 lampreys ; and 3 acres of meadow. In the time of king Edward it was worth IOO shillings; now 6 pounds and 10 shillings. Haimo the Sheriff holds ESTREHAM (Ham ?) 6 of the Abbey itself. Ulward held 308 4 Elected village officers. 6 Held of Chertsey later. 6 There is a Ham in Kingston Hundred, which never, so far as is known, belonged to Chertsey. In the charter of Chertsey ascribed to a year not later than 675 its property is bounded by Hamae Insula, or Hamenege, which is represented not only by the later Ham House, but the older Ham Moor and by Ham Farm. This Ham was potentially an Estreham, or a Ham on the Street, for the Via Militaris, or Here Street, of the Chertsey