Page:VCH Warwickshire 1.djvu/371

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THE HOLDERS OF LANDS are) 9 villeins and 6 bordars with 4 ploughs. T.R.E. it was worth 100 shillings, after- wards 60 shillings; now 100 shillings. IN TREMESLAU HUNDRET The same count holds MORTONE [Moreton- Morrell]. 1 Derman held it, and a free man held it (et liber homo tenuit).* There are 5 hides. There is land for 8 ploughs. In the demesne are 4 ploughs and 18 serfs ; and 2O villeins with a priest and I bordar have 7 ploughs. There are 40 acres of meadow. T.R.E. and afterwards it was worth 6 pounds ; now 1 1 pounds. The same count holds WALTONE [Wal- ton]. 3 Saxi held it and was a free man. There are 5 hides. There is land for 6 ploughs. In the demesne are 3, and 6 serfs ; and (there are) 9 villeins and I bordar with 4 ploughs. There is a mill worth (de) 6 shillings. T.R.E. and afterwards it was worth 3 pounds ; now 7 pounds. The same count holds WALTONE [Wal- ton]. 3 Gida and Saied held it and were free. There are 10 hides. There is land for 10 ploughs. In the demesne are 2 ploughs and 9 serfs ; and (there are) 32 villeins and 3 bordars with 10 ploughs. There are 2 mills worth (de) 12 shillings, and 8 acres of mea- dow. Wood(land) 4 furlongs long and 2 broad. T.R.E. it was worth 100 shillings and after- wards 4 pounds ; now 10 pounds. The same count holds CONTONE [Comp- ton Verney]. 4 Ulward and Cantuin held it 1 There are eight entries relating to various Mortons in the Domesday of Warwickshire, and to identify them is difficult. This however is clear, for Moreton Morrell is the only Moreton in Kineton Hundred, and 'Tremelau' Hundred was subsequently absorbed by Kineton Hundred.

  • The text seems to be corrupt here.
  • Walton in the Subsidy Roll of Edw. III. was in

Kineton Hundred, agreeing with Dugdale. It was, after the time of Domesday, divided into Walton D'Eivile and Walton Mauduit, and the former stands first in the Subsidy Roll. Not improbably the same order was maintained in Domesday Book. The assessment of 1 5 hides seems very severe, if the acreage was then, as now, only 2,100 acres. 4 Disregarding Little Compton, a small village near Long Compton, which, in 1842, was taken from Gloucestershire into Warwickshire, there are in the latter county the following Comp- tons : Long Compton, Fenny Compton, Compton Verney, Compton Scorpion, Compton Wyniates. All these five occur in the Subsidy Roll of I Edward III., the first being there called Cump- ton Magna, the second Fennicumpton, the third and were free. There are 7 hides. There is land for 8 ploughs. In the demesne are 3, and 7 serfs ; and (there are) 14 villeins with a priest and 3 bordars with 5 ploughs. Cumpton Murdak, the fourth Cumptone Scorfen, and the fifth Cumptone Wynzate. All of them have been continuously in Kineton Hundred. Turning now to Domesday Book, we find that the various Comptons are there recorded in the following eight entries : (1) Contone, 7 hides ; held by the Count of Meulan. (2) Contone (in), 4 hides 3 virgates ; held by the Count of Meulan. /(3) Contone (in), 2 hides ; held by Turchil. j (4) (in eadem villa), 3 hides, I virgate ; held ^by Turchil. (5) Contone (in), 3 hides ; held by Turchil (his under-tenant Alwin). (6) Contone parva (in), 5 hides ; held by Robert de Statford. (7) Contone (in), i hide ; held by Robert de Statford (his under-tenant Alwin). (8) Cuntone, 30 hides ; held by Geoffrey de Manneville. Of these eight, No. I is almost certainly (part of) Compton Murdak (now Compton Verney), be- cause that place is close to Morton Morrell and the two Waltons which immediately precede it in Domesday Book, all four of them being probably in 'Tremelau' Hundred. This identi- fication agrees with Dugdale, and is strength- ened by the fact that Compton Murdak (now Compton Verney) is an ancient parish, and the Domesday entry mentions a priest as one of the under-tenants. No. 6 is, it may be affirmed with assurance, Compton Scorfen, which is close to Ditchford, Willington, and Wolford, and is now only a hamlet of Ilmington. It is found, after Domesday, included in the Barony of Stafford. No. 8 I take to be Long Compton, called in the Subsidy Roll of I Edward III. ' Great Compton.' This is clear, not merely because of its evident size and importance, but because the history of its tenure under the Mandevilles is well known, and is given in detail by Dugdale. There remain, then, Nos. i, 3, 4, 5 and 7. With these, Dugdale does not help us, and his identifications may be disregarded, for he identifies both 3 and 4 twice over, once with Fenny Compton, and once with Compton Wyn- iates, and gives no convincing reasons when deal- ing with the other three. If, however, we bear in mind Mr. Round's principle of the J-hide basis of assessment, we shall, I think, be able to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion. No. 2, then, is probably (part of) Fenny Compton ; and for the following reasons : It follows next to Arlescote and close after Worm- leighton and Warmington, all of which are in the same corner of Kineton Hundred, with Fenny Compton, Wormleighton being contiguous and also held under the Count of Meulan by Gilbert. Fenny Compton is also an ancient parish, and the