Proclamation 5628

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Proclamation 5628
by Ronald Reagan
Delivered on 9 April 1987.

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Parents and educators recognize a sacred trust to help children learn about the world in which we live, about all that has gone before, and about all that can be. This trust includes teaching our children about the whole of civilization and humanity's quest for truth, so that they will learn the great lesson that wisdom, love, decency, moral courage, and compassion, as well as technical knowledge and sharpened skills, must be part of everyone's education and everyone's lifework.

American history teaches this lesson well, and American culture, both its weaknesses and its strengths, testifies to its importance. But this lesson needs continual reinforcement. Because education is vital to our children and to the future of all Americans, we do well to call attention to the unflagging efforts of the many people who stress excellence and completeness in education. One of them is the leader of the worldwide Lubavitch movement of Hasidic Judaism, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, whose 85th birthday falls on April 10. The Lubavitch movement has fostered teaching of the ethical values that make civilization possible and that enrich life for everyone. We can be most grateful for all who seek to endow our children with the precious heritage that others have built and preserved for us.

In recognition of Rabbi Schneerson's achievements and in celebration of his 85th birthday, the Congress, by House Joint Resolution 200, has designated April 10, 1987, as "Education Day, U.S.A." and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this event.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Friday, April 10, 1987, as Education Day, U.S.A., and call upon the people of the United States, and in particular our teachers and other educational leaders, to observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 9th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eightyseven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eleventh.

RONALD REAGAN

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 4:30 p.m., April 9, 1987]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).