The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero)/Poetry/Volume 1/Reply to some Verses of J. M. B. Pigot, Esq., on the Cruelty of his Mistress

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REPLY TO SOME VERSES OF J. M. B. PIGOT, ESQ., ON THE CRUELTY OF HIS MISTRESS.[1]

1.

Why, Pigot, complain
Of this damsel's disdain,
Why thus in despair do you fret?
For months you may try,
Yet, believe me, a sigh[2]
Will never obtain a coquette.


2.

Would you teach her to love?
For a time seem to rove;
At first she may frown in a pet;
But leave her awhile,
She shortly will smile,
And then you may kiss your coquette.


3.

For such are the airs
Of these fanciful fairs,
They think all our homage a debt:
Yet a partial neglect[3]
Soon takes an effect,
And humbles the proudest coquette.


4.

Dissemble your pain,
And lengthen your chain,
And seem her hauteur to regret;[4]
If again you shall sigh,
She no more will deny,
That yours is the rosy coquette.


5.

If still, from false pride,[5]
Your pangs she deride,
This whimsical virgin forget;
Some other admire,
Who will melt with your fire,
And laugh at the little coquette.


6.

For me, I adore
Some twenty or more,
And love them most dearly; but yet,
Though my heart they enthral,
I'd abandon them all,
Did they act like your blooming coquette.


7.

No longer repine,
Adopt this design,[6]
And break through her slight-woven net!
Away with despair,
No longer forbear
To fly from the captious coquette.


8.

Then quit her, my friend!
Your bosom defend,
Ere quite with her snares you're beset:
Lest your deep-wounded heart,
When incens'd by the smart,
Should lead you to curse the coquette.

October 27, 1806.[7]


  1. [The letters "C. B. F.  J. B. M." are added, in a lady's hand, in the annotated copy of P. on V. Occasions, p. 14 (British Museum).]
  2. But believe me.—[4to]
  3. But a partial.—[4to]
  4. Nor seem.—[4to. P. on V. Occasions.]
  5. But if from false pride.—[4to]
  6. But form this design.—[4to]
  7. Byron, October 27, 1806.—[4to]