Search results

Jump to: navigation, search
Did you mean: chalk claw
  • passed over chalk the clay may be quite white and chalky (chalky boulder clay). Much boulder clay is of a bluish-grey colour where unexposed, but it
    284 bytes (408 words) - 19:04, 7 February 2016
  • Yellowish-brown clay, unstratified at top and graduating downward into obscurely stratified chalky clay—ten feet. 5. Two thin bands of small chalky gravel, separated
    719 bytes (31 words) - 11:56, 23 August 2015
  • he attributed the formation of the Chalky bowlder-clay in East Anglia and of the purple and Hessle bowlder-clays in Lincolnshire and much of Yorkshire
    807 bytes (26 words) - 23:18, 23 August 2015
  • implements with bones not yet determined in brick earth beneath the great chalky bowlder clay of East Anglia. Dr. Tiddeman says the "Settle till is undoubtedly
    536 bytes (18 words) - 01:50, 10 July 2011
  • their weight; a pebbly soil retains heat longer than one of fine sand. Chalky and clay soils quickly lose heat; and, on this account, the former is called
    105 bytes (1,539 words) - 19:24, 25 April 2015
  • as found in the eastern counties of England in beds beneath the chalky bowlder clay; but on careful examination the geological evidence has not to my
    760 bytes (36 words) - 11:59, 23 August 2015
  • Hill's paper describes and locates the several deposits of chalky sands, chalky clays, and chalky limestones which make up the surface formations of this
    563 bytes (20 words) - 11:54, 22 October 2011
  • instance of the Pleistocene Mammalia in beds more recent than the Chalky Boulder-clay, and in a condition showing they could not be remanié. He doubted
    811 bytes (4,376 words) - 19:09, 27 September 2015
  • Clay′-marl, a whitish chalky clay; Clay′-mill, a mill for preparing clay; Clay′-slate, an argillaceous rock, splitting readily into thin sheets; Clay′stone
    89 KB (12,672 words) - 15:19, 16 September 2013
  • named, in descending order, Hessle Boulder Clay, Purple Boulder Clay, Chalky Boulder Clay, and Lower Boulder Clay—below which is the Norwich Crag. 39 ^  "On
    38 KB (6,494 words) - 00:57, 18 April 2012
  • higher tracts are however largely covered by Boulder Clay: hence there is a mixed soil of chalky clay on which beans and wheat are cultivated, amid other
    300 bytes (10,642 words) - 15:13, 22 February 2013
  • with boiling water, and the working clay was compounded by adding to such powdered frit a small quantity of chalky clay or marl and sometimes pure chalk
    274 bytes (78,629 words) - 05:19, 4 May 2016
  • the cretaceous formation isthe chalk, a white oryellowish-white soft chalky clay, which in its lower half shows the famous fish- bed of Sahel Alma, and
    137 KB (24,338 words) - 21:15, 2 June 2009
  • character, resting on Chalky Boulder Clay, and this again on sand. The Palaeolithic deposits are all clearly later than the latest boulder-clay of East Anglia
    38 KB (6,585 words) - 09:51, 15 April 2012
  • present river systems Gravels of the old river-systems Plateau gravels Chalky boulder-clay Interglacial sands and gravels and Contorted Drift Cromer Till Arctic
    45 KB (7,630 words) - 09:51, 15 April 2012
  • laterite not containing native metals or metallic minerals; g/ Limestone, chalky clay and marbles (except limestone stalactites, white limestone and white
    87 KB (12,465 words) - 09:08, 23 May 2013
  • to do with the mingling of the Tertiary and Chalky material. Besides the occurrence in surface patches, Clay-with-Flints is very commonly to be observed
    3 KB (534 words) - 13:24, 27 February 2013
  • Chalk of Faxoe. — Geographical Extent and Origin of the White Chalk. — Chalky Matter now forming in the Bed of the Atlantic. — Marked Difference between
    26 KB (3,303 words) - 22:11, 2 February 2013
  • in many districts. It is more constant in character, and more typically chalky than the lower stages; flints are abundant, and harder nodular beds are
    227 bytes (1,368 words) - 10:43, 24 May 2016
  • 17 40 30 40 I Arthur Young more than 100 years ago made out one to suit chalky hillsides; Mr Faunce de Laune (Sussex) in our days was the first to study
    467 bytes (2,021 words) - 11:18, 7 March 2014

View (previous 20 | next 20) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)