Search results

Jump to: navigation, search
Did you mean: lexicon definition
  • phrases are used convertibly by those who deal in the article. The lexical definition of crude is: 'In its natural state; not cooked or prepared by fire
    7 KB (989 words) - 07:00, 2 July 2011
  • that something specified shall be done, or shall not be done. The lexical definition of 'impair' is 'to make worse; to diminish in quantity, value, excellence
    23 KB (3,856 words) - 08:08, 2 July 2011
  • dividends were to be paid out of 'the net earnings of the road.' The lexical definition of net is 'clear of all charges and deductions.'-Webster. 'That which
    16 KB (2,709 words) - 07:52, 29 June 2011
  • intended to be expressed. These meanings find illustration in the lexical definition of the word, as well as the adjudicated cases in which it has been
    16 KB (2,803 words) - 11:18, 30 June 2011
  • used in lieu of the lawful money of the United States.' One of the lexical definitions of the word 'sum,' and the sense in which it is most commonly used
    7 KB (1,076 words) - 16:22, 28 June 2011
  • This paper gave the original definition and implementation of the Scheme programming language, a Lisp dialect with full lexical closure based on the lambda
    1 KB (93 words) - 16:43, 28 October 2009
  • implementation of a dialect of LISP named SCHEME with the properties of lexical scoping and tail-recursion; this implementation is embedded within MacLISP
    13 KB (2,104 words) - 03:52, 13 January 2016
  • Steele, Jr. [Page 35] Z5 5. Language Design Considerations SCHEME is a lexically scoped ("full-funarg") dialect of LISP, and so is an applicative language
    5 KB (883 words) - 03:50, 13 January 2016
  • the importance of tail-recursion, but fail to mention the necessity for lexical scoping (perhaps taking it for granted). We feel that the contributions
    2 KB (388 words) - 03:46, 13 January 2016
  • Technology May 1978 ABSTRACT We have developed a compiler for the lexically-scoped dialect of LISP known as SCHEME. The compiler knows relatively
    248 bytes (481 words) - 00:13, 4 September 2011
  • Chapter 12Guy L. Steele, Jr. [Page 100] 90 12. Conclusions and Future Work Lexical scoping, tail-recursion, the conceptual treatment of functions (as opposed
    5 KB (806 words) - 03:46, 13 January 2016
  • this its importance as a document of exegetical tradition, especially in lexical matters, may be easily understood. It was in great part composed before
    20 KB (3,265 words) - 19:48, 10 November 2014
  • lexical depth of the expression being evaluated at that time; i.e., the environment contains bindings only for variables bound in lambdas lexically surrounding
    527 bytes (3,195 words) - 23:21, 7 October 2009
  • specified in the language definition. 2B. Grammar. The language should have a simple, uniform, and easily parsed grammar and lexical structure. The language
    56 KB (7,698 words) - 15:08, 30 April 2011
  • languages. (Note Full-Funarg Example) As an example of the difference between lexical and dynamic scoping, consider the classic case of the "funarg problem"
    23 KB (4,010 words) - 03:45, 13 January 2016
  • semantics of lambda calculus, and has the consequence that all variables are lexically scoped, as in ALGOL. [Naur 63] Another difference is that SCHEME is implemented
    525 bytes (618 words) - 17:43, 8 December 2009
  • things that might well have been left nameless. I have in mind a number of lexical curiosities that furnish diver- sion to any one who chances to read a memoir
    824 bytes (3,835 words) - 21:42, 29 September 2015
  • accommodated. This subset is summarized here. SCHEME is essentially a lexically scoped ("full funarg") dialect of LISP. Interpreted programs are represented
    5 KB (771 words) - 03:51, 13 January 2016
  • naming conflicts here, because the scope of the variables A and B (which is lexical) does not contain any of the arguments to BLOCK written by the user. (we
    15 KB (2,516 words) - 03:49, 13 January 2016
  • oriented! What is the last thing performed by a function? Consider the definition of one: (DEFINE FUN (LAMBDA (X1 X2 ... XN) <body>)) Now <body> must
    435 bytes (1,325 words) - 04:17, 2 February 2011

View (previous 20 | next 20) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)