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  • “The Research Magnificent” (1915); “What is Coming?” (1916); “Mr. Britling Sees it Through” (1916); “The Elements of Reconstruction,” under the pseudonym
    3 KB (409 words) - 15:47, 23 February 2011
  • and, in addition, German translations of Mr. H. G. Wells's "Mr. Britling Sees it Through," and copies of Mr. James W. Gerard's "My Four Years in Germany
    275 bytes (2,057 words) - 13:26, 3 July 2014
  • about it, we do not in our hearts feel it yet. It is something apart from us. I read the other day, as doubtless you read, “Mr. Britling Sees It Through,”
    9 KB (1,559 words) - 07:57, 27 January 2013
  • with what few will fail to regard as the best of war novels, "Mr. Britling Sees it Through." The House has also published several of this many-sided author's
    321 bytes (4,785 words) - 04:48, 8 February 2015
  • speech of American characters makes a mess of it. H. G. Wells’ American in “Mr. Britling Sees It Through” is only matched by G. K. Chesterton’s
    24 KB (4,074 words) - 13:31, 15 April 2012
  • "British Isles, The," 170 British Red Cross manuals, 187 "Britling, Mr., Sees it Through," 220 Brougham, Lord, and John Cassell, 30, 35 et seq. correspondence
    249 bytes (5,753 words) - 05:34, 31 March 2015
  • think I'd have gone balmy if it weren't for Walt Whitman. Talk about Mr. Britling—Walt was the man who 'saw it through.' "The glutton, the idler, and
    31 KB (5,640 words) - 06:10, 24 January 2016