The organisation of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers explained

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The organisation of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers explained  (1874) 
by Thomas Brassey


THE ORGANISATION


OF THE


ROYAL NAVAL

ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS


EXPLAINED


BY


THOMAS BRASSEY, M.P,


LONDON

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

1874




LONDON : PRINTED BY
SPOTISWOODE AND CO., NEW-STREET SQUARE
AND PARLIAMENT STREET



THE ORGANISATION

OF THE

ROYAL NAVAL ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS

EXPLAINED.




Royal Naval Artillery volunteersIt has been thougut desirable to publish the following statement, for the purpose of giving some explanation Artillery of the services, duties, privileges, and general organisation of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers.

How to be recruitedIn inviting persons to enrol themselves in the corps, the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty desire to extend the volunteer movement, so successfully established as an auxiliary to the land forces, to the defence of this country by sea. The proposal is novel and unprecedented in it character. In any other country than our own, it would, in all probability, be visionary. In England, however, we possess a guarantee for the success of such an undertaking, which cannot be found elsewhere. A taste for maritime pursuits pervades this insular nation, and the hope may therefore be confidently entertained that the appeal, now made to the patriotism of the nautical and aquatic sections of the community, will not be urged in vain.

Naval opinions in favour of such a force.Eminent naval authorities have, for many years past, recommended the formation of a corps, for the purposes of coast defence, composed of persons who, while not possessing the wider experience of the seaman, are accustomed to the management of boats, and in the constant habit of going afloat. The Act for the Royal Navy Artillery Volunteers, passed in the last session at the instance of the Admiralty, and the regulations recently issued under that Act, afford the most convincing proof that, in the estimation of those who are actually responsible for the efficiency of the naval service, such a force is desirable. The concurrence of the naval members of the late administration in the various steps which have been taken, may likewise be quoted, in order to show that there is a general desire, among those to whom the welfare of the navy is an especial object of solicitude, for the success of the movement, which it is the object of the present writer to explain.

The Harbour defence onlyIt has been already stated that coast defence, and not service at sea, constitutes the especial sphere proposed for the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers. The term coast defence is perhaps, in a certain sense, a misnomer. The defence of the most important of our commercial harbours against an attack from the sea could not be effectually conducted by a force composed exclusively of men trained for the land service alone. The approach to all the great ports of the United Kingdom from the sea involves the navigation of extensive estuaries, where floating batteries, and armed rafts, and the use of torpedoes, are essential to a complete defence, and would in point of fact effectually prevent the nearer approach of a hostile fleet. In the laying out of torpedoes on an extensive scale, a flotilla of boats would be required; and in furnishing crews for such boats, the well-trained oarsmen, who, it is hoped, will be found willing to enroll themselves in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, would be enabled to render valuable service. In all probability, by their co-operation in the hour of danger, they would release an equal number of highly trained seamen, who would form the crews of sea-going cruisers. All our greatest ports, London, Hull, Newcastle, Leith and Granton, ports for Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bristol, Southampton, Belfast, Dublin, Cork, are situated at the head of an extensive estuary, or at some distance from the mouth of a navigable river. The mere enumeration of these names is sufficient to show how large a sphere there might be, in the event of a threatened invasion, for the employment, in the important and essential task of harbour defence, of an auxiliary force composed, not of trained seamen, but of persons who may be described generally as aquatics.

It is to be observed that a mere oarsman, although not trained at the great guns, or in the use of rifle and cutlass, would be enabled to do good work in a service in which the use of boats must be largely resorted to; and that, in order to take a number at a gun mounted on a raft, such as the 'Nancy Dawson,' which the late Captain Cole improvised for our naval operations in the Sea of Azof, or to serve in a gun's crew in a floating battery for harbour defence, neither sea legs nor sea experience are indispensable qualifications. For such duties those qualities are required which equally combine to make a good gunner and a good soldier, whether afloat or on shore—a fair share of physical strength and activity, intelligence, and, above all, courage and patriotism.

The force need not be numerousDesigned, as the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers have been, for the especial work of coast and harbour defence, it is not necessary that the corps should be very numerous. It certainly need not exceed the numbers of our amateur yachtsmen and oarsmen, for whom the opportunity, now offered, of taking their share in the national defence, is chiefly intended. Enough will have been done, if a brigade can be formed at each of the principal ports, of a strength varying from 200 to 600 men.

The training required.Having described the general scope of the duties, which would devolve on the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, in the event of their being called out for actual service, the nature of the training proposed for the members of the force may be briefly explained. The first consideration must be to familiarise them, to some extent, with the management of boats. This instruction might occupy much time in a corps composed of men, who had never been in the habit of going on the water; but, as the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer corps is to be recruited in a large proportion from among aquatics, many of their number may be expected to possess this qualification without the necessity for special instruction.

The next point to claim attention will be the exercise at the great guns. Here I may venture to affirm, from personal experience, that the naval gun drills have been, in every detail, so carefully considered, the instructors are so completely masters of the subject which they have to teach, and the mechanical appliances are such effectual substitutes for heavy manual labour, that a few days of constant attention will suffice to make a volunteer a useful man in a gun's crew. The class of recruits required for the Royal Nay Artillery Volunteers possess advantages of intelligence and education, far beyond those which the practical seamen can enjoy; and we may anticipate, from the experience already acquired, that they will form some of the smartest gun's crews in any branch of the naval service. There is neither insurmountable difficulty, nor unduly fatiguing labour, in the drill at the great guns. The intricacies could be mastered in a few days, if the volunteers were kept continuously at drill, as they necessarily would be, should they ever be called out for actual service.

The essential point in a volunteer corps is to secure men physically capable of doing their work, and who may be confidently relied upon as ready to serve, whenever they may be called upon.

The small-arm exercises are still more easily mastered. A rowing man will find himself able to use his cutlass efficiently in a few hours; and, after a couple of days of continuous drill, he would be able to go through the manual and platoon exercises with satisfactory smartness and precision.

Rowing and yachting gentlemen will perceive that they will have no difficulty in acquiring the knowledge of their drills, which is required in order to make them efficient, in the winter months. They will not find that their favourite amusements on the water, in the summer months, are incompatible with service in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers.

Facilities for drill.Every effort will be made to afford to those, who may be willing to join the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, the necessary facilities for learning their drills. For the London brigade, the 'Rainbow,' a gun vessel well adapted for the purpose, is now being fitted out at Chatham. This vessel will be ready in two months from the date of this publication; and, when completed, will be moored in the Thames in a convenient position, off Somerset House. Should such an arrangement be found convenient for members of the Corinthian and other yacht clubs at Erith, it is possible that the 'Rainbow' may be moved, from time to time, to moorings near the pier at Erith; and, should a desire to that effect be expressed by the members of the rowing clubs higher up the Thames, an effort will be made to move the vessel to moorings near the boat-houses of any rowing clubs, which have their head-quarters below Kew Bridge.

No positive promise, however, can be given that the 'Rainbow' shall be moved. There are many points to consider, such as draft of water, height and width of arches, and obstruction of the navigation of the river.

For those clubs which are established still higher up the river, where there is not sufficient water to float the 'Rainbow,' facilities for instruction may be provided by mounting a 64-pounder gun on a raft, which could be towed from place to place, and moored to the bank of the river adjacent to the boat-houses belonging to the clubs. An instructor would accompany the raft; and, during the winter months, arrangements might be made for giving to volunteers an opportunity of going through their small-arm drills in a drill-shed, or other convenient place, available for the purpose. Thus it may be found possible to extend the system of instruction, by effectual, yet inexpensive, means, far up the Thames, and so to embrace towns such as Reading, Maidenhead, Henley, Windsor, and even the headquarters of rowing, the University of Oxford.

Inquiry having been made as to whether members will be expected to appear in uniform, whenever they attend drill, it may not be superfluous to mention that the regulations are silent on this point. Members will only be required to wear uniform on special occasions, of which due notice will be given.

Regulations as to drill.Members of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer corps may therefore rest assured that they will have the opportunity of being thoroughly instructed in the drills, in which it is considered desirable that they should be proficient.

The drills will comprise those for great guns, rifle, pistol, and cutlass, as in the Royal Navy, and no deviation from these drills is to be permitted.

The Officer-Instructor.All drills will be carried out by the instructor, attached to the brigades, under the officer-instructor. The permanent staff of a brigade will consist of an officer-instructor and one petty officer instructor for each battery. The officer-instructor will be commissioned as a lieutenant in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, and will be selected from officers of or retired from the Royal Navy, of and above the rank of lieutenant. He will keep the muster-rolls, and it will be his duty to make himself acquainted with all the members of his brigade, and their qualifications. He will superintend all drills and exercises, and is to have complete control over the petty officer instructors, and to be responsible to the Admiralty for their conduct and efficiency.

Attendances at drill.On the important point of the number of attendances at drill, the regulations require that every volunteer must attend at least two drills a month, until he has obtained the standard of an efficient. An efficient must be able to perform in a satisfactory manner the duties of any number except No. 1 at heavy gun exercise, or at revolving gun exercise, as applicable to the 64-pounder guns mounted in gun-boats; and he must be possessed of a good knowledge of the manual, platoon, and cutlass exercises.

It has already been explained that these qualifications may easily be acquired in a fortnight of continuous attendance at drill, by the application of a very ordinary amount of intelligence and attention. Service afloat not compulsoryThe regulations expressly avoid the imposition of any compulsory service afloat in time of peace. Target practice afloat is obviously essential to the efficiency of a naval gunner; and it is therefore desirable that every volunteer should have a fair number of opportunities of taking part in this useful exercise. In a long summer's day, the members of the London Brigade may embark in a gunboat at Erith or Gravesend, proceed to the Maplin Sands, off Shoeburyness—which is the most convenient place for firing practice over a sea range—and return to London by a convenient hour in the afternoon or evening. It will doubtless be the desire of every naval volunteer to avail himself of a sufficient number of opportunities for target practice, to secure his own efficiency. But, as there are many who will be anxious to have a greater amount of exercise afloat, every volunteer, who wishes it, may embark once a year, and remain for a period of eight days in a gunboat, manned by a crew to be furnished from the battery to which he himself belongs. It should, however, be observed that, when called out for actual service, the volunteers will not be liable to embark in sea-going vessels. Whenever so assembled, they will serve on board any of H.M. ships employed in the defence of the coasts of the United Kingdom; unless, indeed, they volunteer for, and are found capable of doing duty in, sea-going cruisers. They will not be required to go aloft, or to attend to the fires in the stoke-hole. They will, however, have to accommodate themselves to the berthing and messing arrangements usual for the seamen of the Royal Navy.

Regulations issued by the AdmiraltyThe regulations recently issued contain ample information as to the organisation of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers; and their practical effect will be summarised in the foliowing extracts from the code of rules.

The Volunteers are raised under the Act passed in 1873. They will be called out by Royal proclamation, and will be liable to serve in any vessels employed for coast defence. They will be liable to perform all the ordinary duties of the vessels in which they may be embarked, in the same manner as those duties are performed by the regular crews of Her Majesty's ships, except those duties that can only be performed by practical seamen.

The Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer force, for administrative purposes, will be formed into brigades, and each brigade will consist of four or more batteries of from 60 to 80 men. Each brigade will be designated by a local name.

The following table contains the authorised establishment for brigades and the batteries composing them:—


Battery Brigade
of four
batteries
Brigade
of six
batteries
Brigade
of eight
batteries
Lieutenant-commander 1 1 1
Sub-lieutenant 1 4 6 8
Chief petty officer 1 4 6 8
First-class petty officer 2 8 12 16
Second-class petty officer 2 8 12 16
Buglers 2 8 12 16
Leading gunners and gunners (equivalent to leading seamen and able seamen) 71

275

421

563

51 195 301 403
Staff Lieutenant-instructor 1 1 1
First-class petty officer instructor 1 4 6 8
Surgeon 1 1 1
Bugle-major 1 1 1
Armourer 1 1 1
Total enrolled 80

320

480

640

60 240 360 480


In this table, two numbers divided by a line signify the maximum and minimum strength—thus 80/60 means not more than 80 and not less than 60.

Persons wishing to organise a corps to form part of a brigade of Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers should place themselves in communication with the Secretary of the Admiralty.

Whenever it is practicable, a brigade will be formed at each of the large ports in the kingdom, and the batteries composing the brigade will be raised in the immediate neighbourhood of the port.

When the Volunteers are not of sufficient strength at any port to form a brigade, the batteries enrolled on a part of the coast formed into a district will be formed into a brigade, and will be called a district brigade.

The object of this organisation is to unite separate batteries under one head, to secure uniformity among them, and to afford them the advantage of an officer-instructor.

Candidates for enrolment as members of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers must be of good character, and physically fit for the service; their eligibility will be judged by the commanding officer of the corps, assisted by such others of the corps as he may think fit to appoint for that purpose.

No person below the age of 17 is to be enrolled in the corps without the special authority of the Admiralty.

Boys of 14 years of age and upwards may be enrolled for the purpose of being trained as buglers.

Men belonging to any other force liable to be called out for service in case of war are not to be enrolled.

Apprentices are not to be enrolled without the consent of their masters.

Persons dismissed from any other service or corps for misconduct are not to be enrolled without the special sanction of the Admiralty.

The commanding officer of a corps is to give to any Volunteer, on his quitting the corps, a certificate of discharge, when requested to do so by such Volunteer.

Every member has power to withdraw from the corps upon giving 14 days' notice to that effect.

Enrolled members are classed as efficients and non-efficients.

All enrolled members who do not fulfil the conditions above referred to are reckoned as non-efficients.

Each brigade will be commanded by a lieutenant commanding.

Each battery will be commanded by a sub-lieutenant.

In each battery there will be, as it has already been stated, one chief petty officer, two 1st class, and two 2nd class petty officers.

The petty officers of a battery will be selected by the commanding officer of the battery.

When assembled for drill or inspection, the Volunteers will be under the command of the senior naval officer of the district. When the Volunteers are assembled for drill, the senior officer will be represented by the officer instructor, a retired commander or gunnery lieutenant of the Royal Navy, whose duty it will be to see that all drills are properly carried out.

When afloat, the Volunteers are to be, in all matters whatsoever, under the command of the captain or commanding officer of the ship in which they may be.

The authority of the officers commanding batteries is strictly limited to their own batteries only. The discipline will be the same throughout the corps, and will be enforced by the lieutenant commanding the brigade, in conformity with the regulations issued by the Admiralty.

The lieutenant commander will make arrangements for drill, securing, so far as it may be necessary, separate hours for each battery. Before adopting any final arrangements for drill, he will confer with the officer instructor.

There may be an occasional general muster of the corps, when considered necessary by the lieutenant commanding.

The batteries will take precedence at general parades according to their numbers, and not according to the seniority of their respective commanding officers.

The brigade staff will not be attached to a battery, but will act under the lieutenant commanding only.

Officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers rank with, but after, officers of the Royal Navy and Royal Naval Reserve of their respective ranks.

All officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers will be commissioned by the Admiralty.

The commanding officers of brigades will recommend, for the consideration of the Admiralty, names of persons for the appointments and promotion of officers in their brigades.

The appointment of an honorary commander to a brigade is allowed, and such honorary lieutenants and sub-lieutenants as the Admiralty may think fit to sanction.

Officers in full pay in the Navy or Army are not eligible for other than honorary commissions.

The uniform approved for the officers resembles generally that worn by officers of the Naval Reserve, silver being substituted for gold lace.

The principle upon which the Volunteers should be The officers of the corpsofficered has been one of the most frequent subjects of discussion among those who have associated themselves with the movement from the commencement, and who have been provisionally enrolled, with the sanction of the Admiralty, in anticipation of the passing of the Act of Parliament of last year.

A desire has been expressed that no officers should be appointed to the corps, but that the Volunteers should serve only under direct naval command. Practically, the desire, so strongly felt, has been fulfilled in the arrangements which have actually been made.

Whenever called upon to serve afloat, or when embarked for the purpose of training, the Volunteers will be under the command of the officer, commanding the ship, in which they may be. When embarked for their first cruise in the autumn of the present year, the arrangements were, of necessity, experimental and provisional. There was a natural desire on the part of the officer commanding the 'Foam' to meet the wishes of the Volunteers themselves in every possible way, consistent with the efficient performance of the service, and the carrying on of the drills and exercises required. The same considerate spirit will doubtless prevail on all future occasions; but the Volunteers, who make themselves acquainted with the regulations, will clearly perceive that, whenever they embark, they place themselves under direct naval authority; and that, when afloat, their own officers are never to assume any naval command or authority whatever, unless ordered to do so by their superior naval officers.

The officers of the Voulnteers will do their utmost to assist the naval officers to preserve discipline. They may, if they think fit, set an example to their men by taking an active part in all the duties and manual exercises. They may fall in at quarters, and take any number at the gun. In short, they may become, as much as they please, active working seamen and efficient practical gunners. It is for them to use their own discretion in determining how much or how little they shall participate in the manual labour, involved in carrying out the drills and exercises ordered by the naval officers in command.

When at drill, as it has already been pointed out, the officer-instructor will superintend the instruction of the Volunteers, and he will be responsible that all exercises are properly carried out, in accordance with the regulations from time to time laid down for the instruction of the Royal Navy. It will thus be evident that the paramount and undivided authority of the naval officers over the Volunteers when afloat, and the superior responsibility of the officer of instruction when the Volunteers are at drill, so largely overshadow the authority of the officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers in all matters, excepting those which relate to discipline and the civil administration and organisation of the corps, that it could not reasonably be expected that retired naval officers of rank should volunteer to become battery officers in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Corps. Naval officers of less exalted rank do not often retire, if they have a great zeal for the service. Some exceptions, however, there must be to this general rule; and it is probable that a certain number of retired officers from the junior ranks of the Navy will, hereafter, kindly offer their services to command brigades or batteries in the ports or districts, in which they may happen to reside. The Volunteers will at all times feel a pride in availing themselves of such opportunities of acting under officers, who have received a high professional training in Her Majesty's naval service.

While the effect of the arrangements, which have been described, necessarily limits the sphere of the officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, their services, in several important points, are not the less essential. It is to them that the Admiralty must look for the exercise of their personal influence, in inducing recruits to join their respective brigades and batteries; and their moral influence will be the principal security for the maintenance of good discipline in a force composed exclusively of Volunteers. Although, under the regulations, no fixed standard of efficiency is expressly required in an officer of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer force, those among them, who can command sufficient leisure for the purpose, will readily appreciate how excellent an effect must be produced by the personal example of an officer, who will take pains to make himself acquainted with the drills and exercises, in which the men under his command are instructed. He will have the opportunity of obtaining the same certificate of proficiency, which is given to those officers of the Naval Reserve, who become qualified to drill the seamen of the reserve at the great guns, and in the small arm exercises.

With the view of enlisting, in support of the Naval Volunteer movement, the potent influences which are derived from the esprit de corps, wherever it may reasonably and prudently be encouraged, it is proposed to associate certain batteries in the London brigade with some of the principal rowing and Corinthian yacht clubs on the Thames, and to give commissions to any gentlemen, otherwise eligible, who are instrumental in raising a full battery of Naval Volunteers.

The rowing and Corinthian yacht clubs.The following list of some of the principal rowing clubs, will serve to show the large number of gentlemen, from whom assistance may be expected, in promoting the success of a movement for extending the Volunteer service to a certain sphere of naval operations;

Name of rowing club Number of
members
London 480
Kingston 425
Thames 300
Ino 300
Waldegrave 200
Twickenham 175
West London 170
Oscillators 162
North London 150
Grove Park 150
Isleworth 100
Ilex 100
Molesey ——


The Corinthian yacht clubs on the Thames are equally a le to render assistance, and are indeed capable of raising, if they think fit, an entire brigade for the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Corps.

The resources of the clubs located on the banks of the Thames have been particularly specified; because the present writer, in his connection with the movement under consideration, is more immediately identified with that river. Readers of these pages, residing in the vicinity of any of our great ports, will doubtless be able to discover equally ample materials for the foundation of a sufficient force, for the purposes of co-operation in the defence of the coast, in their own neighbourhood. A corps, though it may be raised at some distance from the sphere of its intended operations, in the event of threatened invasion, will not be the less valuable for the defence of a great port.

The railway and the telegraph afford the means of concentrating large bodies of men in a few hours at any port on the shores of the United Kingdom. Wherever the coast-guard are stationed, the means exist of giving instruction to the Naval Volunteers. All the out-ports, at which men have been enrolled, can be visited by a gunboat at frequent intervals, to embark the Volunteers for target practice afloat; while those who wish to go to sea for an eight days' cruise, will have, every year, the opportunity of doing so.

The Volunteer movementIn conclusion, it may not be superfluous to offer a few observations on the Volunteer movement generally. The most cogent inducements to Volunteer activity may appear to be wanting at the present time. Our country is happily not threatened with the danger of foreign invasion. A becoming modesty will deter any individual connected with the Volunteer service from arrogating to himself any share in the prestige and distinction, which are the special privilege of the regular services. It is an essential feature of the present movement that there shall be no contribution from the state in the form of pecuniary reward for services rendered; and that every effort shall be made by the Volunteers to impose as small a burden as possible on the Exchequer. The sterner sense of duty, which is now encouraged among the Volunteers for land service, is opposed to all attempts to gain popularity for the auxiliary forces by festivals, holidays, and entertainments.

While, however, all these inducements and attractions are withheld, a higher standard of efficiency in the officers and the men is properly insisted on. In presence of the difficulties which arise from the altered conditions of the service, some earnest friends of the Volunteer movement have been oppressed with doubts, as to the possibility of stimulating the patriotism of the country to such a pitch, that Volunteers shall still be forthcoming in a time of profound peace. I do not conceal my individual opinion that compulsory service may fairly be required, from every individual of military age, when the country is in danger. Unfortunately, so strong a measure would probably meet with an amount of resistance, which could not be overcome in this free country, where nothing affecting the social habits and prejudices of the people can be proposed, which is not universally popular. But I venture to hope that we may rely, in the absence of direct legal compulsion, on motives even more powerful than the strong arm of the law. If every man who is capable of co-operating in the defence of his country should feel himself compelled, by his sense of duty and patriotism, to enter his name in the roll of her defenders, the liability to service, thus imposed by the free will of the Volunteer upon himself, will be a far more effectual safeguard than legal compulsion, for the security and the honour of England.

The Volunteer movement affords the occasion for teaching, in the most practical form, the duty of self-sacrifice in a worthy cause.

In the artificial conditions of modern society, there are multitudes of men, who, in the ordinary exercise of their vocation, are unduly deprived of the opportunities for physical exercise and development. More especially is this true of the younger members of the professional and commercial classes. To them an appeal is now most earnestly made on behalf of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers. In taking a part in our drills and exercises, they will do a work beneficial to themselves individually, and conducive to the welfare of their country.

N.B.—Any gentlemen wishing to join the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, may communicate with Mr. Thomas Brassey, M.P., or Commander St. Vincent Nepean, R.N., at the temporary head-quarters, 4, Great George Street, Westminster. The regular drills of the corps will not be commenced until the drill vessel 'Rainbow' has been moored off Somerset House, and all other arrangements have been completed. Gentlemen are earnestly invited to send in their names, in the meanwhile, provisionally, so that the organisation of the brigade may be completed at an early date; and that the movement at the out-ports may be encouraged by the example of the metropolis.

REGULATIONS

FOR THE

"ROYAL NAVAL ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS."




CONSTITUTION AND ESTABLISHMENT.

Authority1. The "Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers " are raised under the "Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Act of 1873."

They are subject to the provisions of that Act, and to all regulations made with regard to them by the authority of the Admiralty.

Liability for actual service2. By Royal Proclamation, the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers may be assembled for actual service; and whenever so assembled, they will be liable to serve on board any of Her Majesty's ships or vessels employed in the defence of the coasts of the United Kingdom, or in any of the tenders or boats attached to such vessels.

They will also be liable to perform all the ordinary duties of the vessel in which they may be embarked, in the same manner as those duties are performed by the regular crews of Her Majesty's ships, except those duties that can only be performed by practical seamen.

They will not be required to go aloft, or to attend the fires in the stoke-hole.

They will accommodate themselves to the berthing and messing arrangements usual for the Seamen of the Royal Navy.

Corps, definition of.3. A Corps is a body of persons who combine, under common rules, to form a part of the Naval Artillery Volunteer force.

The members of a Corps are either enrolled or honorary.

Enrolled Members.Enrolled members are persons of every grade, whose names are duly entered for service in the muster-rolls of a Corps.

Honorary membersHonorary members are persons who contribute to the Honorary funds of a Corps, but are not enrolled for service.

Formation4. The Naval Artillery Volunteer Force, for administrative purposes, will be formed into Brigades, and each Brigade will consist of four or more Batteries of from 60 to 80 men.

How to be named.5. Each Brigade will be designated by a local name, in addition to its number in the Force.

Each Battery will be designated by its number in the Brigade.

Every Corps will bear a local name only.

Commanding Officers6. Each Brigade will be commanded by a Lieutenant Commanding.

Each Battery will be commanded by a Sub-Lieutenant.

Every Corps will have a Commanding Officer, who will of necessity be the Senior Officer belonging to the Corps, no matter what his rank may be, and who will be responsible, under the "Naval Artillery Volunteer Act, 1873," for the management of the internal affairs of the Corps.

Establishment7. The following table contains the authorised establishment for Brigades and the Batteries composing them:—

Battery Brigade
of four
batteries
Brigade
of six
batteries
Brigade
of eight
batteries
Lieutenant-commander 1 1 1
Sub-lieutenant 1 4 6 8
Chief petty officer 1 4 6 8
First-class petty officer 2 8 12 16
Second-class petty officer 2 8 12 16
Buglers 2 8 12 16
Leading gunners and gunners
(equivalent to leading seamen and able seamen)
71

275

421

563

51 195 301 403
Staff Lieutenant-instructor 1 1 1
First-class petty officer instructor 1 4 6 8
Surgeon 1 1 1
Bugle-major 1 1 1
Armourer 1 1 1
Total enrolled 80

320

480

640

60 240 360 480

In this table, two numbers divided by a line signify the maximum and minimum strength—thus 80/60 means not more than 80 and not less than 60.


FORMATION OF CORPS.

Course to be pursued for the formation of a new corps8. Persons wishing to form a Corps to form part of a Brigade of Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers should place themselves in communication with the Secietary of the the Admiralty.

Reason for formation9. The Admiralty, in considering offers of the services of Reason for a new Corps, will have regard to the number of Corps or formation. Batteries already existing on the same part of the Coast where the proposed Corps would be.

New Corps not to be formed under certain circumstances.10. The formation of a new Corps will not be sanctioned, unless a sufficient number of persons to form a Battery are prepared to enrol themselves, and whilst any Battery already existing in the locality is below its establishment.

Information to be given on application.11. In offering the services of a new Corps for acceptance, it should be stated:—

(a) The place proposed for its head-quarters.

(b) The number of persons who are prepared to enrol themselves.

(c) The name and address of some person with whom communications on the subject may be made.

(d) The Brigade of which it will form a part.

(e) That a proper place will be secured for the safe custody of any Government arms and ammunition which may be issued.

(Form in Appendix A.)

Singe Brigade.12. Whenever it is practicable, a Brigade will be formed at each of the large ports in the Kingdom, and the batteries composing the Brigade will be raised in the immediate neighbourhood of the port.

District BrigadeWhen the Volunteers are not of sufficient strength at District any port to form a Brigade, the batteries enrolled on a part of the coast formed into a district, will be formed into a Brigade, and will be called a District Brigade.

The object of this organization is to unite separate batteries under one head, to secure uniformity among them, and to afford them the advantage of an Officer Instructor.


PRECEDENCE AND COMMAND.

Rank of the Force13. The "Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Force" takes precedence immediately after the "Royal Naval Reserver Volunteers" established by the Act of 1859.

Precedence of Brigades14. The relative precedence of the Brigades forming the Force is determined by the date on which they were first severally established.

Precedence of Corps.15. The relative precedence of Corps is determined by the date on which the Secretary of the Admiralty has first received a letter offering the services of the Corps.

Precedence of Officers with others.16. Officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers rank with, but after, Officers of the Royal Navy and Royal Naval Reserve of their respective ranks.

Precedence of Officers with each other.17. The relative precedence of Officers of the whole Force is determined solely by the rank and date of their commissions in the Force.

Precedence of Officers of same date.18. The relative precedence of Officers bearing commissions of the same date is determined by the order in which their names appear in the Navy List.

Nothing in these Regulations is to give a claim to any Officer of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers to assume command of any of Her Majesty's Land Forces on shore, nor to any Officer of Her Majesty's Land Forces to assume command of any of Her Majesty's Naval Forces.

But when Officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers are employed on shore on joint service with Her Majesty's Land Forces, their relative rank shall carry with it all precedence and advantages attaching to the rank with which it corresponds, except command as aforesaid.

To be under command of Senior Naval Officer whenever assembled.19. All Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, when assembled for drill or inspection, or voluntarily doing any naval duty either afloat or on shore, will be under the command of the Commander-in-Chief, or Senior Naval Officer of the district within which such Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers are undergoing drill or inspection, or doing duty.

Not to assume Naval Command unless specially ordered.20. The Officers and Petty Officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers shall command each other, and the Gunners and Buglers of the Force, agreeably to their respective ranks, in all matters relating to their duties; but none of them are ever to assume any naval command or authority whatsoever, unless ordered to do so by their Superior Naval Officers, and they are to be, in all matters whatsoever, under the command of the Captain or Commanding Officer of the ship in which they may be, and of the Officer of the Watch for the time being whatsoever his rank may be.


HONOURS AND DECORATIONS.

Guards21. A Guard of Honour may be provided as a matter of course for a member of the Royal Family, or the Admiralty, on arrival in the neighbourhood of the quarters of a Brigade: but in no other case will any body of the Naval Artillery Volunteers take part in any public procession or ceremony, or form a Guard of Honour, without the special authority of the Admiralty or the Senior Naval Officer of the district.

Decorations.The only decorations that may be worn on the left breast are those given by the Queen or by a Foreign Sovereign.

In the last case mentioned, Her Majesty's permission to accept and wear the decoration must have been granted.

The medal of the Royal Humane Society may be worn.


OFFICERS.

Appointment.23. All Officers of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers will be commissioned by the Admiralty.

Commanding Officers to recommend.24. The Commanding Officers of Brigades will recommend for the consideration of the Admiralty, names of persons for the appointments and promotion of Officers in their Brigades.

In order to enable the Admiralty to judge the qualifications of the persons recommended, the Commanding Officer will forward, with his recommendation, a statement giving the name, age, residence, place of education, and occupation or profession of the Candidate, as well as a Medical Officer's Certificate, stating that the Candidate is in good health and fit to perform the duties of an Officer.

Holding a commission in other Forces.25. If any person recommended for an appointment as an Officer holds a commission in the Royal Navy or other Force, the nature of such commission should be stated in the letter of recommendation.

Eligbility of Full Pay Officers.26. Officers on full pay in the Navy or Army are not eligible for other than honorary commissions.

Honorary Commander.27. The appointment of an Honorary Commander to a Brigade is allowed, and such Honorary Lieutenants and Honorary Sub-Lieutenants as the Admiralty may think fit to sanction.

Honorary Chaplain and Surgeon.28. The appointments of an Honorary Chaplain and Honorary Staff-Surgeon to a Brigade are allowed at the discretion of the Admiralty.

Honorary appointments when to cease.29. The appointments of all Honorary Officers will cease whenever the Force is called out for actual service, unless the Admiralty shall see fit to accept the services of any such Officers who may volunteer for active service.

Precedence of Honorary Officers.30. No Officer holding an honorary commission can, in virtue of it, take precedence of any Officer holding a substantive commission of the same rank.

Officers to possess a knowledge of duties, &c.31. Every Officer is required to possess a competent knowledge of his duties, and to give a proper attendance at the drills of his Corps.

Any Officer who does not attend the number of drills prescribed for the enrolled Volunteers of his Corps, to qualify them for certificates of efficiency, will not be allowed to retain his commission unless the Admiralty may see special reasons for a relaxation of this Regulation.


PETTY OFFICERS.

Appointment.32. The Petty Officers of a Battery are appointed by the Commanding Officer of the Battery, from among the enrolled members of the Battery.

Leading Gunners.33. Leading Gunners may be appointed by the Commanding Officer of a Battery, in the proportion of one to every twenty of Enrolled Gunners.

Reduction.34. A Petty Officer or Leading Gunner may be reduced by the Commanding Officer of a Brigade, for any sufficient cause; such cause to be judged by the officers of the Brigade sitting as a Court of Inquiry.


ENROLLED MEMBERS.

Qualification.35. Candidates for enrolment as Members of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers must be of good character and physically fit for the Service; their eligibility will be judged by the Commanding Officer of the Corps, assisted by such others of the Corps as he may think fit to appoint for that purpose.

Age.36. No person below the age of 17 is to be enrolled in the Corps without the special authority of the Admiralty.

Boys of 14 years of age and upwards may be enrolled for the purpose of being trained as Buglers.

Disqualification.37. Men belonging to any other force liable to be called out for service in case of war are not to be enrolled.

Apprentices are not to be enrolled without the consent of their masters.

Persons dismissed from any other Service or Corps for misconduct are not to be enrolled without the special sanction of the Admiralty.

Certificate of Discharge.38. The Commanding Officer of a Corps is to give to any Volunteer, on his quitting the Corps, a Certificate of Discharge, in Form B of the Appendix when requested to do so by such Volunteer.

Classification39. Enrolled Members are classed as Efficients and non-Efficients.

Efficients40. An Efficient Member must have fulfilled the conditions prescribed by the Admiralty from time to time.

Non-Efficients.41. All Enrolled Members who do not fulfil the conditions above referred to are reckoned as non-Efficients.


HONORARY MEMBERS.

Number and position42. The number of Honorary Members attached to any Number and Corps is not regulated by the Admiralty, and such Members are not included in the muster-roll of the Corps to which they are attached.

They are not subject to discipline nor allowed to interfere with the duties of the Corps, but they are permitted to wear its uniform, unless a special provision to the contrary is contained in the authorised Rules of the Corps.


RULES.

Must be approved43. In order to give legal force to the Rules of a Corps for the management of its affairs, they must be submitted to the Admiralty for approval.

To be transmitted in duplicate.44. All Rules which are to be forwarded for approval must be transmitted in duplicate, one copy to be retained at the Admiralty, the other to be returned to the Corps, with any alterations that may be required.


COURTS OF INQUIRY.

Nature of45. A Court of Inquiry is not a judicial body; it has no power to administer an oath.

It is to be considered as a Board of which the Admiralty or an Officer in command of a Brigade or Corps may make use, to assist him in arriving at a correct judgment on any subject upon which it may be expedient to institute an inquiry.

Duties of46. The duties of a Court of Inquiry depend on the instructions which the convening authority may think proper to give.

It may be either employed merely in collecting and arranging evidence, or it may, in addition, be directed to give an opinion as to the facts established by that evidence; but it has no power to pronounce any judgment as to the course to be taken by the convening authority in dealing with those facts.

When facts connected with the conduct of an individual are submitted to the investigation of a Court of Inquiry, it is necessary that the instructions for the guidance of the Court should be sufficiently specific, as regards matter, names, dates, and places, to convey clearly to the Court the nature of the subject into which it is appointed to inquire, and also to enable the person whose conduct is called in question to know what he has to answer.

It rests with the authority who orders the assembly of the Court of Inquiry to decide whether it shall be open or close.

All evidence taken by a Court of Inquiry is to be recorded as nearly as possible in the words of the witness and in the order in which it is received.

The proceedings when closed are to be signed by the President and Members, after which they are to be forwarded by the President to the convening authority.

May be reassembled47. A Court of Inquiry may be re-assembled as often as the superior authority may deem necessary, and on every occasion of its meeting it is competent to receive and record new evidence.

Power of Commanding Officer to assemble.The Commanding Officer of a Brigade is authorised to assemble a Court of Inquiry, to investigate any matter with which he himself has the power of dealing.


DISCIPLINE.

48. The course to be adopted as to the Discipline of the Volunteers will be found in Part III of the Naval Artillery Volunteers Act.

Meetings not be held on Actions of Superiors.49. Meetings are not to be held in the Corps for the purpose of expressing an opinion upon the acts of a Commanding Officer, or of recommending him to take a particular course of action; nor are memorials to be drawn up to the same effect; and no meetings except those called together by or under the authority of the Commanding Officer of a Brigade or Corps, who will be responsible for doing so, will be recognised.

If any Volunteer has cause to think himself aggrieved, he will represent his case to the Commanding Officer of his Battery. Any appeal against the decision of the Commanding Officer of the Battery will be made through him to the Commander of the Brigade, and any further appeal will be made through both these officers to the Admiralty.

Not to attend political meetings in uniform50. Members of the Force are not, individually or collectively, to attend political meetings, or join in public political discussion or demonstrations in uniform.

Bands of Music51. Bands of Volunteer Brigades are not to appear in uniform, for any purpose, without the consent of the Commanding Officer of the Brigade.

Permanent Staff not to receive presents.52. Members of the Permanent Staff will be held responsible that they do not allow themselves to be complimented, either directly or indirectly, by presents or collective expressions of opinion from persons who are serving or who have served in the Brigade to which they are attached.

Volunteers to salute Superiors of all Services.53. Officers and men of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, when in uniform, are to pay the customary marks of respect to such Officers of the Navy, Army, and Auxiliary Forces as are entitled to be saluted by Officers and men of corresponding rank in their own Service.

Officers to observe and enforce all Regulations.54. Every Officer and Petty Officer shall make himself acquainted with and shall duly observe and obey, and as far as in him lies, enforce the due execution of the "Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Act, 1873," and the Regulations for the "Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Force," together with all Regulations, Instructions, and Orders, which may from time to time be given or issued by the Admiralty, or by any Superior Officer, and shall in all respects conform his conduct to the customs and usages of Her Majesty's Naval Service.

Discipline in Camp.55. When Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers are assembled with the Regular Forces of the Army in Camp or for training, they will be under the "Naval Discipline Act, 1866," in the same manner as if they were on actual service, and will be placed under the immediate command of an Officer of Her Majesty's Navy.

Camp rules will apply in all respects to the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers.

The Naval Volunteers must perform the Camp duties of fatigue, cooking, &c.

Case of misconduct when training to be reported56. In case of grave misconduct of any of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers whilst on board any of H.M. ships for the purpose of training, the Officer in command of the ship will report the circumstance to the Admiralty through the usual channel.


ASSEMBLIES OF THE FORCE.

Conditions on which to meet under Arms.57. The Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers are not to assemble under arms for any purpose unconnected with Parade, Drill, or Rifle practice, except with the approval of the Admiralty.

Brigaded with other Forces.58. The Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers may, when circumstances permit, be brigaded with other Forces, the sanction of the Admiralty having been previously obtained.

Visiting Garrison or Camp.59. When any of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers desire to visit any Garrison or Camp as a naval body, the permission of the Secretary at War must first be obtained through the Admiralty.

Upon all occasions of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers entering a Garrison or Camp as a body, the Officer in command must duly report his arrival to the Senior Naval Officer present, or, if there is not one, he will wait on the Officer in command of the Garrison or Camp.

Command at Rifle Shooting Matches.60. When the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers are brought together under arms at Rifle Shooting Matches, on other occasions, with other Volunteer Corps, or with any of Her Majesty's Land Forces on shore, the Officer in Command of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, present, shall take care that everyone under his command complies with all the Regulations of the Land Forces relative to the Camp or ground on which they may be, and he shall confer with the Senior Officer of the Land Forces, and act in concert with him, so that the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer may in all cases act in accordance with the orders under which the Land Forces are acting; but it is to be distinctly understood that nothing in this Regulation is to give a claim to any Officer of Her Majesty's Navy, or of any Naval Volunteer Corps, to assume command of any of Her Majesty's Land Forces, nor to any Officer of Her Majesty's Land Forces to assume command of any of Her Majesty's Naval Forces.

Surplus ammunition to be collected.61. When the Volunteers, at the termination of an exercise, are to return by railway or boat to their headquarters, the arms are to be examined, and all the ammunition which has not been expended must be collected and placed in a metal or leather case, with a view to its being conveyed in safety to the head-quarters.


STORES.

Responsibility for and care of.62. The Commanding Officer of a Corps is responsible for and care to the Admiralty for all stores which are supplied by Government for the use of the Corps.

Arms to be supplied by GovernmentEach Corps will be supplied gratuitously with arms from the Government stores to the full number of its enrolled members, if required.

Description of arms64. The arms to be supplied are in Appendix C.

Amouries to be available before arms are supplied.65. Before any Government arms can be issued, it is necessary that the Admiralty shall be satisfied that one or more places of security for the custody of the arms have been provided at the expense of the Volunteers. The Drill Ships, Coast Guard Stations, or Police Stations will probably be available in some places for the purpose.

Application for arms.66. Commanding Officers of Corps are to apply for the arms required in the prescribed Form of Requisition given in Appendix D, addressed to the Secretary of the Admiralty.

Marking arms.67. The arms of a Brigade will be marked previously to their issue, and a request to that effect is to be inserted in the requisition on which the arms are demanded.

No other marks than those on them when issued are on any account to be put on the arms.

Responsibility for arms.68. All arms issued to the Corps remain the property of Her Majesty's Government, and the Commanding Officer for the time being is held responsible for their being at all times in a serviceable state, and for their being returned into store when required in good condition, fair wear and tear excepted.

Cleaning and care of arms.69. Great attention should be paid to the proper cleaning and care of the arms entrusted to the Volunteers, and the Commanding Officers are to point out to those under their command that, should rust be allowed to accumulate on any part of a rifle, it must inevitably impair the accuracy and efficiency of the weapon.

Depositing arms.70. The arms are to be deposited after drill in the armouries of the Brigade or Corps, except when the Commanding Officer may judge it expedient to permit members of the Brigade to keep their arms at their own houses.

As the Commanding Officer is responsible for the condition of the arms, this permission may be withdrawn by him whenever he may consider it necessary.

The arms retained in private custody will be subject to inspection at any time, and they are to be examined at least once in six months by the Commanding Officer of the Brigade or Officers appointed by him for that purpose.

Repairs of arms.71. Arms requiring repair are to be deposited with the Gunner of the Drill Ship to which the Brigade is attached.

Charge for repairs.72. Repairs of arms arising from fair wear, found to be necessary in order to make the arms serviceable, will be executed free of charge; the expense of other repairs will be borne by the Corps.

Allowance of AmmunitionAmmunition in the following proportion, to be Ammunition, reckoned from the 1st April in each year, is allowed:—

For Guns.
For each Battery of Brigade Shot 100
Shell 25
Blank 30
or
For each Trained Man Shot 4
Efficient Shot 2
And for the Battery Shell 25
Blank 30
For Small Arms.
      Gratis Allowed
to be
purchased.
Total.
For every Efficient for
his first year's service
Rifiled Ball 70 50 120
Blank 10 50 60
Pistol 100 100 200
Caps 110 110 220
For every Efficient after
his first year's service
Rifiled Ball 50 70 120
Blank 60 60
Pistol 50 100 150
Caps 60 110 170


Storing of AmmunitionRequisitions for small arm ammunition, in accordance with the established proportion, are to be forwarded to the Commanding Officer of the nearest Drill Ship or District Coast Guard Ship for transmission to the nearest Control Officer. Special demands should be forwarded to the Secretary of the Admiralty by the Captains of the above ships for approval, on Form given in Appendix E.

74. Every Brigade is required to provide a secure place for the custody of its small arm ammunition; but in cases where the store of ammunition is sufficiently large to make it desirable that it should be stored in the magazines of any of Her Majesty's ships, used as Drill Ships for the Volunteers, Commanding Officers of such ships will afford facilities for its reception.

Conveyance of Ammunition75. Every care is to be taken in the conveyance and general handling of ammunition, and the Regulations and customs of the Royal Navy in that respect are to be strictly adhered to.

Metal Cylinders,&c.76. Metal cylinders, or leather cartridge cases, for conveying the surplus ammunition collected from the pouches of Volunteers, under the provisions of Article 61, will be supplied at cost price.

Return of articles unservicable or obsolete.77. No article of equipment will be returned into store for the purpose of being replaced, until it has become thoroughly unserviceable. No articles will be returned into store on account of being of an obsolete pattern without the authority of the Admiralty.

Stores lost or injuried to be paid for.78. All arms or other stores supplied free of cost and placed in the custody of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, are, if lost, destroyed, or injured by fault or neglect, to be paid for by the Corps.

Demands for Stores.79. All demands for stores, in accordance with the established proportion allowed, are to be made out in the War Office Forms in use in Her Majesty's Navy, and are to be forwarded by the Commanding Officers of Brigades to the nearest Drill Ship or Coast Guard Ship for transmission to the nearest Control Officer. Special demands should be forwarded to the Secretary of the Admiralty for approval by the Captains of the above-named ships.


DRILL.

Nature of80. The drills of the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers will comprise the drills for Great Guns, Rifle, Pistol, and Cutlass, as in the Royal Navy, and no deviation from those drills is to be permitted.

By whom to be carried out81. All drills will be carried out by the Instructors attached to the Brigades under the Officer Instructor, and when on board any of Her Majesty's ships they will be also subject to the supervision of the Commanding Officer of the ship.

Qualifcation for "Efficient"82. The qualification necessary for an Efficient will be found in the Appendix F, and may be amended as the Admiralty may from time to time think necessary.

Badge of Efficiency83. A Badge of Efficiency will be worn by men who were returned as "Efficient" in the last Annual Return of the Brigade.

The Badge will consist of a chevron of silver lace worn on the right arm above the wrist.

Men who have been five times returned as efficient may wear one star, and those who have been returned ten times may wear two stars above the badge.

Trained Man84. Volunteers who pass the examination for Trained Man, as in the Royal Navy, will be so designated, and will wear two chevrons of silver lace on the right arm above the wrist.

Non-efficients to attend drills.85. Every Volunteer must attend at least two drills a month until he has obtained the standard of an "Efficient."

Firing practice to be superintended.86. No firing practice with great guns is to be carried on by Volunteers, except under the superintendence of an Officer of the Royal Navy, or of an Officer Instructor of Volunteers, unless a relaxation of this rule has been especially sanctioned by the Admiralty.

Precautions when at gun-practice87. Sword bayonets are not to be worn at gun-drill, or when moving powder.

No smoking is on any account to be allowed in the vicinity of magazines or cases containing powder.

No persons are to be allowed to congregate round barrels or cases containing powder.

Powder cases or barrels are not to be opened either inside a magazine, or immediately outside the door.


ALLOWANCES.

On actual service88. When on actual service the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers will receive the same pay, allowances, and victuals as the Officers and Continuous Service Seamen of the ranks and ratings in the Royal Navy of relative rank, and will have the same means of allotting pay to wives, relatives and friends, and whilst on actual service will be treated in the same manner in every respect.

Not on actual service.89. When not on actual service and embarked on board any of Her Majesty's ships for more than forty-eight hours, the Volunteers will be victualled for the whole time they are so embarked, or receive compensation for provisions at the rate of 1s. 6d. per day; but when they are embarked for less than forty-eight hours, they will not receive victuals or an allowance in lieu.

Wounds or injuries on service or drill.90. If a Volunteer is wounded or injured on service or on drill, he will be entitled to the same pension to which any seamen in Her Majesty's Navy would be entitled for a similar wound or injury; or if killed, slain, or drowned on service, or on drill, his widow (if any) will be entitled to the same gratuities, out of Greenwich Hospital Funds as the widow of any other Seamen of the Navy of the same rating.

Hospital or Sick Quarters.91. Volunteers taken seriously ill or injured whilst undergoing drill, may be sent to a Naval Hospital or Sick Quarters for treatment.

Applications for Pensions.92. Applications for pensions or compensations for injuries or hurts received whilst on service or drill, are to be specially made to the Admiralty; the nature and cause of the injury are to be fully reported, and the names of the witnesses, as also whether blame was attributable to the Volunteer making the application, when the case will be considered as it deserves.

Purchase of clothing, &c.93. Volunteers are allowed to purchase at the Government rate any clothing or necessaries that may be requisite for their outfit or dress as belonging to the Corps.


PERMANENT STAFF.

Composition.94. The Permanent Staff of a Brigade will consist of Composition, one Officer Instructor to the Brigade, and one Petty Officer Instructor for each Battery composing the Brigade.

Appointment.95. The appointments to the Permanent Staff will be made by the Admiralty, and will be tenable for a term of five years, or for such lesser period that the Admiralty may think fit.

Officer whence selected.96. The Officer Instructor will be commissioned as Officer Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers, and will be selected from Officers of, or retired from, the Royal Navy, of and above the rank of Lieutenant.

Qualification.97. The Officer Instructor will be required to undergo Qualification, a course of Instruction in one of the Gunnery Ships to qualify him for the duties of Instructor in Heavy and Truck Gun Drills, Rifle, Pistol and Cutlass Exercises.

Not to hold other appointment98. As the services of an Officer Instructor will be at all times required by the Volunteers, he will not be permitted to follow any profession or appointment, public or private.

Age.99. No Officer whose age exceeds 50 years is eligible for the appointment of Officer Instructor.

Rank and position.100. An Officer Instructor of Naval Volunteers is purely a Staff Officer, and except for the purpose of Instruction, is not entitled, by virtue of his superior rank, to take the command of any Force of Naval Volunteers, when an Officer of the Corps is present.

General Duties101. An Officer Instructor is appointed to give Instruction to the Volunteers. He is subject to the orders of his Commanding Officer, and he is required to assist him in carrying on the naval duties of the Brigade; but he is not to take any part in the civil affairs of the Brigade.

It is his duty to keep the muster-rolls of the Brigade, and to make himself acquainted with all the members of Brigade, and their qualifications and dispositions.

He is to superintend the drills and exercises of the Brigade, and is to have complete control over the Petty Officer Instructors of the several Batteries, and is responsible to the Admiralty that their duties are properly performed, and that the drills are in accordance with those laid down for the Royal Navy.

Diary.102. The Officer Instructor is required to keep a diary of the Instruction imparted by him to the Volunteers according to Form G Appendix. This diary is to be certified by the Commanding Officer of the Brigade, and transmitted to the Admiralty on the 1st of every month.

Control over Petty Officer Instructors.103. The Officer Instructor will, under the Commanding Officer of the Brigade, have control over the Petty Officer Instructors, both as regards their discipline and their duties as Instructors; and he will, should he have occasion, report any misconduct or incompetency of a Petty Officer Instructor to the Admiralty.


PETTY OFFICER INSTRUCTORS.

Rank and position.104. The Petty Officer Instructors will have the rank First Class Petty Officers in the Royal Naval Artillery Volunteer Force, and will be selected from Pensioned Petty Officers of the Royal Navy and must hold a Certificate from one of the Gunnery Ships of competency as an Instructor in Heavy and Truck Gun Drill, Rifle, Pistol and Cutlass Exercises.

They will be purely Staff Petty Officers, and will not be entitled, by virtue of their superior rank, to take the command of any of the Naval Volunteers, when a Petty Officer of the Corps is present, except for the purpose of instruction.

Duties105. The Petty Officer Instructors are to give instruction to the Volunteers under the direction of the Officer Instructor. They are subject to the Command of their superior Officers of the Naval Volunteers, and are to assist them in carrying on their Naval duties, but they are not to take any part in the civil affairs of the Brigade.

Conduct.106. The Petty Officer Instructors will be expected, on all occasions, to set an example of what the Naval Volunteers should attain to, and they will only be allowed to retain their position so long as they conduct themselves as Petty Officers of the Royal Navy should do.

They are to consider the Officer Instructor as their immediate head, and apply to him in all matters that may be necessary.

Diary107. The Petty Officers Instructors will each keep a diary of the instruction imparted by him to the Volunteers according to Form in Appendix H. This diary is to be certified by the Commanding-Officer of the Battery, and transmitted weekly to the Officer Instructor.

Pay of Permenant staff.108. The Permanent Staff will receive pay as follows:—

Officer Instructor 10s. per day.
Petty Officer Instructor 3s.


UNIFORM.

For Officers.

109. The Uniform to be worn by the Royal Naval, Artillery Volunteers is to be of the same pattern as for Officers of the corresponding ranks in the Royal Navy, with the following exceptions viz.:—

Distinctive lace.110. Instead of each distinctive stripe of half-inch gold Distinctive lace round the sleeve, there is to be a stripe formed of two waived lines of quarter-inch silver braid, running parallel to each other so as to form bands three-quarters of an inch wide, the blue cloth to show quarter of an inch between the lines of braid.

Buttons111. The buttons to be of the Naval Pattern, with the letters R.N. on one side of the anchor and A.V. on the other side.

The crown and anchor to be gilt, and the remainder of the button silver.

Epaulettes112. The epaulettes to be silver, and, instead of the anchor on the epaulette, there is to be a badge consisting of an anchor in the centre, surrounded by the words "R. N. A. Volunteers," embroidered in gold.

Crown and stars, when worn on the epaulettes, to be embroidered in gold.

Hat.113. Instead of the bullion loop on the cocked hat, the loop to be formed of two silver braids, waved as on the coat sleeves, and the tassels to be silver.

Badge for cap.114. The badge for the cap to have the letters R.N. Badge for placed on one side of the anchor, and the letters A.V. on the other side.

The anchor and letters to be embroidered in gold, and the surrounding laurel leaves in silver. The crown to be embroidered in gold and silver, as in the Naval Pattern.

Sword-belt.115. The plate of the sword belt and the swivel to be silver. The crown and anchor on it to be gilt, and the letters R.N.A.V. on each side of the anchor, also gilt.

Lace and embrodiery116. All lace and embroidery, except where otherwise ordered in these Regulations, is to be of silver.

Dress Uniform,

Dress Uniform
117. Coat the same as undress.
Trowsers.—The lace on the seam to be silver.
Sword-belt.—The embroidered lines to be silver.

The dress-trowsers and sword-belt to be worn only on such occasions as are customary in the Royal Navy.

Petty Officers and Gunners,

118. The Uniform to be of the same pattern as for Petty Officers and Seamen of the Royal Navy, with the following exceptions, viz.:—

Buttons.119. The buttons on jackets of Chief Petty Officers to be of silver, the same as those of the Officers.

The buttons of the Petty Officers and Gunners to be of the same pattern, but of black horn.

Trimmings.120. The tape trimmings of the white frock to be waved in the same manner as the braid on the coat sleeves of the Officers.

Badges.121. All badges are to be of silver embroidery on the jackets, and of silver or white on the blue serge.

On the white frock they are to be blue.

Cap ribbons.122. The cap ribbon to have a crown and anchor in front, with the letters R.N. on one side of the anchor, and the letters A.V. on the other.

The crown and anchor and letters to be embroidered in silver on a black silk ribbon.

The letters to be five-eighths of an inch in size.


CORRESPONDENCE AND RETURNS.

123. All official correspondence from the Volunteer Brigades except the correspondence of the Officer Instructor in his capacity of Instructor, is to proceed from the Commanding Officer, or to pass through him.



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This work was published before January 1, 1927, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.