To Venetian Artists

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Blake manuscript - Notebook - page 060

Edited text:[1][edit]


To Venetian Artists
  
THAT God is colouring Newton does show,
And the Devil is a black outline, all of us know.
Perhaps this little fable may make us merry:
A dog went over the water without a wherry;
5 A bone which he had stolen he had in his mouth;
He cared not whether the wind was north or south.
As he swam he saw the reflection of the bone.
‘This is quite perfection—one generalizing tone![2]
Outline! There’s no outline, there’s no such thing:
10 All is chiaroscuro, poco-pen—it’s all colouring!’
Snap, snap! He has lost shadow and substance too.
He had them both before. ‘Now how do ye do?’
‘A great deal better than I was before:
Those who taste colouring love it more and more.’

________________________________________

The original text:[3][edit]


To Venetian Artists

Blake manuscript - Notebook - page 061

That God is Colouring Newton does shew[4]
And the devil is a Black outline all of us know
Perhaps this little Fable may make us merry
A dog went over the water without a wherry
5A bone which he had stolen he had in his mouth
He cared not whether the wind was north or south
As he swam he saw the reflection of the bone
This is quite Perfection, one Generalizing Tone
Outline Theres no outline Theres no such thing
10All is Chiaro Scuro Poco Piu its all Colouring
Snap. Snap! he has lost shadow & substance too
He had them both before now how do ye do
A great deal better than I was before
Those who taste colouring love it more & more

________________________________________


Notes[edit]

  1. The Poetical Works of William Blake, including the unpublished French Revolution together with the Minor Prophetic Books and Selections from The Four Zoas, Milton & Jerusalem; edited with an introduction and textual notes by John Sampson, Hon. D.Litt. Oxon., 1862–1931. London, New York: Oxford University Press, 1908.
  2. 8 Here ’s two for one, what a brilliant tone MS. 1st rdg. del. 9, 10 A marginal addition.
  3. "The Complete Poetry & Prose of William Blake", ed. by David V. Erdman, Anchor Books, 1988, p. 515.
  4. To Venetian Artists N 61
    Lines 1-2 are an insertion written on p 60 and followed by the link “Perhaps this little Fable &c”.
    8 one Generalizing Tone] heres two for one 1st rdg; what a brilliant tone 2nd rdg del
    9-10 a marginal insertion (On "poco piu" see note below on Public Address, p 60.)
    11 Snap. Snap! he has] He snapd & 1 st rdg del; Then he snapd & 2nd rdg del
    14 Those who taste colouring] Ive tasted shadow & 1st rdg del

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.