Translation:Catullus 42

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

Come, hendecasyllables, as many as you all are
from all sides, however many you all are.
A foul whore thinks that I am a joke,
and denies that she may return to me our
tablets, if you are able to endure that.
Let us follow her and demand back.
Who is she, do you ask? That one, whom you see
with an ugly march, laughing as an annoying mimic,
and with the mouth of a Gallic dog.
Stand around her, and demand back,
"rotten whore, give back my tablets,
give the tablets back, you dirty whore!"
Do you not make an As? O filth, brothel,
or whatever more depraved thing you are able to be.
But nevertheless we must not think this enough.
Because if no other is able let us force a blush
from the wild fast of the dog.
Shout out again with a greater voice,
"rotten whore, give back my tablets,
give the tablets back, you dirty whore!"
But we benefit nothing, she is not moved.
Your reason and method must be changed,
if your are able to benefit more:
"Chaste and approved one, give us back the tablets."

Adeste, hendecasyllabi, quot estis
Omnes undique, quotquot estis omnes.
Iocum me putat esse moecha turpis
Et negat mihi uestra reddituram
Pugillaria, si pati potestis.
Persequamur eam, et reflagitemus.
Quae sit quaeritis? Illa quam uidetis
Turpe incedere, mimice ac moleste
Ridentem catuli ore Gallicani.
Circumsistite eam, et reflagitate:
'Moecha putida, redde codicillos,
Redde, putida moecha, codicillos.'
Non assis facis? o lutum, lupanar,
Aut si perditius potes quid esse.
Sed non est tamen hoc satis putandum.
Quod si non aliud potest, ruborem
Ferreo canis exprimamus ore.
Conclamate iterum altiore uoce
'Moecha putida, redde codicillos,
Redde, putida moecha, codicillos.'
Sed nil proficimus, nihil mouetur.
Mutanda est ratio modusque nobis,
Si quid proficere amplius potestis,
'Pudica et proba, redde codicillos.'

42.1
42.2
42.3
42.4
42.5
42.6
42.7
42.8
42.9
42.10
42.11
42.12
42.13
42.14
42.15
42.16
42.17
42.18
42.19
42.20
42.21
42.22
42.23
42.24

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15