Woman of the Century/Harriet B. Jones

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JONES, Miss Harriet B., physician, born in Ebensburgh, Pa., 3rd June, 1856. Her ancestors on both sides were Welsh. Her father emigrated from Wales when a boy. The family removed from Pennsylvania to Terra Alta, W. Va., in June, 1863. There Harriet dwelt during her childhood. At an early age she entered the Wheeling Female College, from which stie was graduated 3rd June, 1875. Music and art were important features of her education. After leaving school, she was not content to remain at home. She realized the need of more female physicians, and proposed to take up the study of medicine. This idea did not exactly meet the approval of her parents and friends; but when they saw her determination, all opposition was withdrawn, and, instead, assistance and encouragement were rendered. HARRIET B. JONES. A woman of the century (page 435 crop).jpgHARRIET B. JONES. She went to Baltimore to pursue her studies, and was graduated with honors from the Woman's Medical College, 1st May, 1884. Dr. Jones commenced to practice in Wheeling in September, 1885, having spent some time in travel. In August, 1887, she was elected assistant superintendent of the State Hospital for the Insane in Weston, W. Va. Desiring to make a specialty of nervous diseases, she accepted that position and rendered faithful and efficient service until April, 1892, when she returned to Wheeling and established a private sanitarium for women's and nervous diseases, which institution is now in a prosperous condition. Besides her professional work, she is interested in every movement tending to promote morality, temperance and religion. Her work in Weston in the temperance cause was successful. There she organized a White Cross League, beginning with five, and the membership increased to thirty-three, including boys from fifteen to twenty years of age. The organization is still in existence and doing good work. When she went to Wheeling, she immediately resumed that work there, and is leader of a band of twenty-four members. Recognizing her ability as a leader, the Woman's Christian Temperance Union unanimously elected Dr. Jones to be their president, as did also the Union Chautauqua Circles of Wheeling. Her knowledge of the needs of her sex, together with the earnest solicitations of her friends, have induced her upon several occasions to speak in public. Dr. Jones spends her days in alleviating suffering, dispensing charities and encouraging literary culture.