001 Infantry Division (United States) Unit History

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001 Infantry Division (United States) Unit History
United States Army Center for Military History
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).

Contents

Heraldic Achievements[edit]

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia[edit]

1st US Infantry Division.svg

Description[edit]

  • On an olive drab shield 2½ inches (6.35 cm) in width and 3 3/4 inches (9.53 cm) in height overall (the parallel sides 2½ inches (6.35 cm) in length with a 90 degree angle pointed base) a red Arabic numeral "1" (13/4 inches (4.45 cm) in height overall)
  • COMBAT SERVICE IDENTIFICATION BADGE: A silver color metal and enamel device 2 inches (5.08 cm) in height consisting of a design similar to the shoulder sleeve insignia.

Symbolism[edit]

  • The numeral identifies the Division's designation.

Background[edit]

  1. The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1st Division on October 31, 1918.
  2. It was amended on March 31, 1917, to include the background of the insignia in the design.
  3. It was redesignated for the 1st Infantry Division on August 19, 1942.
  4. The insignia was amended to revise the description on October 6, 1972.
  5. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-76).

Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

1 Infantry Division DUI.PNG

Description[edit]

  • An oval-shaped gold color metal and enamel device 1⅛ inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a gold color metal background encircled by an elliptical band divided horizontally of red to the top and blue to base, inscribed on the blue the motto “VICTORY” in gold color metal letters; centered on the device is the figure from the 1st Division Monument, modeled, in gold color metal, with wings and upraised arms extending over the red portion of the band.

Symbolism[edit]

  1. The colors red and blue are from the distinguishing flags of Infantry Divisions
  2. The figure portion is that of the 1st Infantry Division Monument, located in Washington, DC.

Background[edit]

  1. The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Headquarters, Headquarters Detachment and Headquarters, Special Troops, 1st Division on December 9, 1930.
  2. It was redesignated for wear by all non-color-bearing elements of the 1st Infantry Division on September 9, 1965.
  3. The insignia was amended to revise the description and add a symbolism on January 14, 1974.

Flag[edit]

FlagInfDiv.PNG

Description[edit]

  • a. Size:
  1. Hoist: Three Feet.
  2. Fly: Four Feet.
  3. Fringe: 2½”
  • b. Organizational colors:
  1. The flag consists of two horizontal stripes of equal width.
    1. Top Stripe: Red
    2. Bottom Stripe: National Flag Blue.
  2. Shoulder Sleeve Insignia: Centered; proper; 15 inches high.
  3. Piping: White.
  4. Fringe: Yellow.

1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

1Bde 1ID Insignia.PNG

Discription Pending[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Coat Of Arms[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 1BDE, 1ID COA.png

Blazon[edit]

  • Shield: Per fess embattled Azure (National Flag Blue) and Or, between a lion’s head erased in chief and a fleur-de-lis in base all counterchanged, a bend Gules bearing a compass rose and scimitar point to base of the second.
  • Crest: From a wreath Or and Azure (National Flag Blue) between four mullets crosswise of the first, four arrows points up, two and two parallel in saltire Proper, bearing a shield blazoned: “Gules, three pallets, a palm frond palewise in dexter Or.”
  • Motto: VICTORY THROUGH VERSATILITY.

Symbolism[edit]

  • Shield
  1. Scarlet, the color of sacrifice and courage, honors the unit being awarded the Valorous Unit Award for AL ANBAR PROVINCE.
  2. The Valorous Unit Award is one of the highest unit decorations and is awarded for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy.
  3. The compass rose, alluding to the sun, and scimitar highlight the unit’s war service in Southwest Asia.
  4. The fleur-de-lis is for World War I service in Europe.
  5. The lion, symbol of strength and courage, is associated with both Europe and Middle Eastern heraldry and art.
  6. The embattlements signify fortification and defense.
  7. Gold is emblematic of honor and excellence.
  • Crest
  1. The four stars commemorate the number of decorations awarded the unit.
  2. The red and gold shield represents the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm award.
  3. This award is for accomplished deeds of valor or displayed heroic conduct while fighting an enemy force
  4. The four arrows represent the campaign participation credits for World War I, Vietnam, Southwest Asia, and the War on Terrorism.

Background[edit]

  • The coat of arms was approved effective 16 September 2009.

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 1BDE, 1ID DUI.png

Description[edit]

  1. A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Per fess embattled Azure (National Flag Blue) and Or, between a lion’s head erased in chief and a fleur-de-lis in base all counterchanged, a bend Gules bearing a compass rose and scimitar point to base of the second.
  2. Attached around the sides and bottom of the shield is a Dark Blue tripartite scroll doubled and inscribed “VICTORY” “THROUGH” “VERSATILITY” in Gold.

Symbolism[edit]

  1. Scarlet, the color of sacrifice and courage, honors the unit being awarded the Valorous Unit Award for AL ANBAR PROVINCE.
  2. The Valorous Unit Award is one of the highest unit decorations and is awarded for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy.
  3. The compass rose, alluding to the sun, and scimitar highlight the unit’s war service in Southwest Asia.
  4. The fleur-de-lis is for World War I service in Europe.
  5. The lion, symbol of strength and courage, is associated with both Europe and Middle Eastern heraldry and art.
  6. The embattlements signify fortification and defense.
  7. Gold is emblematic of honor and excellence.

Background[edit]

  • The distinctive unit insignia was approved effective 16 September 2009.

Flag[edit]

  • a.Size:
  1. Hoist: Three Feet.
  2. Fly: Four Feet.
  3. Fringe: 2½”
  • b.Description.
  1. The flag has a solid background with an embroidered American eagle displayed centered thereon.
  2. In its right talon the eagle holds an olive branch; in its left talon, a bundle of 13 arrows, all in proper colors.
  3. Its beak grasps a scroll inscribed with the unit motto.
  4. On the eagle’s breast is embroidered the shield of the coat of arms and the crest is above the eagle’s head.
  5. Below the eagle is a scroll inscribed with the designation of the organization.
  • c. Organizational colors:
  1. Organization: Branch Immaterial
  2. Background: Teal Blue
  3. Fringe: Yellow
  4. Letters and Numbers: Teal Blue
  5. Scrolls.
    1. Outline:Yellow
    2. Background: White

2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

2nd BDE 1st ID.png

Description[edit]

  • A silver color metal and enamel device 1¼ iches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a blue arrowhead on which is superimposed a silver lion rampant.

Symbolism[edit]

  1. The 2nd Infantry Brigade has in its organization the 26th and 28th Infantry Regiments.
  2. The Mohawk arrowhead, a regimental insignia during World War I, is from the coat of arms of the 26th Infantry Regiment.
  3. The lion, a charge on the arms of the ancient province of Picardy, is taken from the coat of arms of the 28th Infantry Regiment.

Background[edit]

  1. The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Infantry Brigade on September 25, 1928.
  2. It was rescinded on August 3, 1964.
  3. The insignia was reinstated and redesignated for the 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division and amended to change the size of the insignia on December 11, 1980.

Flag[edit]

Description[edit]

  • a. Size:
  1. Hoist: Three Feet.
  2. Fly: Four Feet.
  3. Fringe: 2½”
  • b. Organizational colors:
  1. The flag has two vertical stripes of equal width with the shoulder sleeve insignia above the number of the brigade in Arabic numerals, both centered on the flag.
    1. Top Stripe: Red
    2. Bottom Stripe: National Flag Blue.
  2. Insignia:
    1. Shoulder Sleeve Insignia: Centered; proper; 10 inches high.
    2. Brigade Number or Alpha abbreviation: Centered below the SSI; proper; 8 inches high.
  3. Numerals or letters: White.
  4. Piping: White.
  5. Fringe: Yellow.

Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Coat of Arms[edit]

STB, 2BDE, 1ID COA.png

Blazon[edit]

  • Shield: Per fess arched Celeste (Light Blue) and Azure a fess arched Vert edged Argent, overall a pale of the last surmounted of another Azure (Dark Blue) charged with five pheons erect Argent (Silver Gray).
  • Crest: From a wreath Argent and Celeste (Light Blue), two palm fronds in chevron reversed Vert superimposed at base by a banner, Gules, Or and Sable, overall four daggers interlaced fretwise, blades and garnish of the fifth, hilt and pommel of the sixth.
  • Motto: POINT OF THE DAGGER.

Symbolism[edit]

  • Shield:
  1. The background colors symbolize the unit’s ability to deploy worldwide in a timely manner; light blue refers to the air, green implies the earth/land and blue is for the sea.
  2. The pale denotes military strength and dark blue is the color traditionally associated with Infantry units and emphasizes the Battalion’s promptness to enable the Brigade and other Battalions within the Brigade with military intelligence, signal, engineer, military police, chemical, biological, and nuclear capabilities.
  3. The pheons signify readiness and allude to the five components that comprise the Special Troops Battalion: military intelligence, signal, engineer, military police and chemical, which are crucial to success of the Brigade on the battlefield.
  • Crest:
  1. The palm fronds denote honor, symbolizing the decorations awarded for service in Vietnam and Iraq.
  2. The banner signifies reward for valiant service and indicates the Battalion’s Superior Unit Award.
  3. The daggers in fret illustrate the unit’s four campaign credits.

Background[edit]

  • The coat of arms was approved on April 18, 2008.

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 2BDE, 1ID DUI.png

Description[edit]

  • A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 5/32 inches (2.94 cm) in height overall blazoned as follows: Per fess arched Celeste (Light Blue) and Azure, a fess arched Vert overall a pale Azure (Dark Blue) charged with five pheons Argent (Silver Gray). Attached below the shield a Dark Blue tripartite scroll inscribed “POINT OF THE DAGGER” in Silver.

Symbolism[edit]

  1. The background colors symbolize the unit’s ability to deploy worldwide in a timely manner; light blue refers to the air, green implies the earth/land and blue is for the sea.
  2. The pale denotes military strength and dark blue is the color traditionally associated with Infantry units and emphasizes the Battalion’s promptness to enable the Brigade and other Battalions within the Brigade with military intelligence, signal, engineer, military police, chemical, biological, and nuclear capabilities.
  3. The pheons signify readiness and allude to the five components that comprise the Special Troops Battalion: military intelligence, signal, engineer, military police and chemical, which are crucial to success of the Brigade on the battlefield.

Background[edit]

  • The distinctive unit insignia was approved on April 18, 2008.

Flag[edit]

  • a.Size:
  1. Hoist: Three Feet.
  2. Fly: Four Feet.
  3. Fringe: 2½”
  • b.Description.
  1. The flag has a solid background with an embroidered American eagle displayed centered thereon. In its right talon the eagle holds an olive branch; in its left talon, a bundle of 13 arrows, all in proper colors.
  2. Its beak grasps a scroll inscribed with the unit motto.
  3. On the eagle’s breast is embroidered the shield of the coat of arms and the crest is above the eagle’s head.
  4. Below the eagle is a scroll inscribed with the designation of the organization.
  • c. Organizational colors:
  1. Organization: Branch Immaterial
  2. Background: Teal Blue
  3. Fringe: Yellow
  4. Letters and Numbers: Teal Blue
  5. Scrolls.
    1. Outline:Yellow
    2. Background: White


3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1 Infantry Division[edit]

  • Information Pending

Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1 Infantry Division[edit]

Coat of Arms[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 3BDE, 1ID COA.png

Blazon[edit]

  • Shield: Celeste (Oriental Blue) a cross formy Sable fimbriated Or surmounted by a fret, the bend and bendlet Or, the mascle a stylized hexagon Azure (Cobalt Blue) fimbriated of the last; on a chief embattled Vert edged Or a lightning flash of the third.
  • Crest: From a wreath Or and Celeste (Oriental Blue) a stylized Croix de Guerre of bronze Proper, the swords of the first, surmounted in base by two palm fronds Proper, overall a fleur-de-lis Azure with a band Gules edged Or.
  • Motto: VALIANT WARRIORS.

Symbolism[edit]

  • Shield:
  1. The integration of various branches to form the Brigade Special Troops Battalion is symbolized by the colors oriental blue, cobalt blue, and green, which refer respectively to Military Intelligence, Chemical, and Military Police. Combat Engineer and Signal branches are recalled by the stylized fret and the lightning flash in chief.
  2. The stylized hexagon and embattled chief refer again respectively to the Chemical and Combat Engineer organizations.
  3. The black cross formy recalls the unit’s proud affiliation with the Duke Brigade.
  4. Black also denotes strength of purpose, yellow or gold signifies excellence.
  • Crest:
  1. The bronze cross represents the three-time award of the French Croix de Guerre for World War II campaigns.
  2. The palms refer also to the Croix de Guerre and recall campaign participation in the Vietnam Conflict and service in Iraq 2004 to 2005.
  3. Three Meritorious Unit Commendations for service in Vietnam are represented by the scarlet and gold band on the fleur-de-lis which in turn denotes distinguished World War II service in Northern France, Normandy, Algeria-French Morocco and areas in Central Europe. Campaign participation in France during World War I is also recalled by the fleur-de-lis.
  4. The two swords in saltire signify combat readiness and national defense capabilities.
  5. Gold denotes excellence.

Background[edit]

  • The coat of arms was approved on 7 September 2007.

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 3BDE, 1ID DUI.png

Description[edit]

  • A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Celeste (Oriental Blue) a cross formy Sable fimbriated Or surmounted by a fret, the bend and bendlet Or, the mascle a stylized hexagon Azure (Cobalt Blue) fimbriated of the last; on a chief embattled Vert edged Or a lightning flash of the third. Attached below the device a Green motto scroll inscribed “VALIANT WARRIORS” in Gold letters.

Symbolism[edit]

  1. The integration of various branches to form the Brigade Special Troops Battalion is symbolized by the colors oriental blue, cobalt blue, and green, which refer respectively to Military Intelligence, Chemical, and Military Police. Combat Engineer and Signal branches are recalled by the stylized fret and the lightning flash in chief.
  2. The stylized hexagon and embattled chief refer again respectively to the Chemical and Combat Engineer organizations.
  3. The black cross formy recalls the unit’s proud affiliation with the Duke Brigade.
  4. Black also denotes strength of purpose, yellow or gold signifies excellence.

Background[edit]

  • The distinctive unit insignia was approved on September 7, 2007.

Flag[edit]

  • a.Size:
  1. Hoist: Three Feet.
  2. Fly: Four Feet.
  3. Fringe: 2½”
  • b.Description.
  1. The flag has a solid background with an embroidered American eagle displayed centered thereon. In its right talon the eagle holds an olive branch; in its left talon, a bundle of 13 arrows, all in proper colors.
  2. Its beak grasps a scroll inscribed with the unit motto.
  3. On the eagle’s breast is embroidered the shield of the coat of arms and the crest is above the eagle’s head.
  4. Below the eagle is a scroll inscribed with the designation of the organization.
  • c. Organizational colors:
  1. Organization: Branch Immaterial
  2. Background: Teal Blue
  3. Fringe: Yellow
  4. Letters and Numbers: Teal Blue
  5. Scrolls.
    1. Outline:Yellow
    2. Background: White

Headquarters, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1 Infantry Division[edit]

  • Information Pending.

Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1 Infantry Division[edit]

Coat of Arms[edit]

Special Troops Battalion, 4BDE, 1ID COA.png

Blazon[edit]

  • Shield: Azure, in chief two lightning bolts saltirewise Or, in base a bar wavy Argent bearing a barrulet Celeste, overall a tower Gules charged with a key ward to base of the second below a mullet of the third.
  • Crest: None Authorized due to lack of Combat Service.
  • Motto: TRAINED AND READY.

Symbolism[edit]

  • Shield:
  1. The dark blue gives emphasis to the battalion’s support provided to the Infantry Division as well as the other battalions within the brigade.
  2. Gold is emblematic of excellence and high achievement and red is the color of valor and sacrifice.
  3. The castle tower, adapted from the Corps of Engineer branch insignia, represents the Engineer branch and the mobility and survivability capabilities that the battalion provides to the brigade.
  4. The lightning bolts symbolize the communications and electronic warfare elements of the unit’s mission and denote the timely support and modern communications capabilities of the Signal branch.
  5. The key refers to Military Intelligence and the critical nature of the mission they provide to support the commander’s decision-making process that is crucial to victory on the battlefield.
  6. The star represents the command and control capability that the unit provides to the brigade.
  7. The wavy bars symbolize water and underscore the unit’s ability to deploy to any theater of war in a timely manner.

*Crest: None authorized due to lack of Combat Service.

Background[edit]

  • The coat of arms was approved on October 31, 2005.

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

Special Troops Batalion, 4BDE, 1ID DUI.png

Description[edit]

  • A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Celeste (Oriental Blue) a cross formy Sable fimbriated Or surmounted by a fret, the bend and bendlet Or, the mascle a stylized hexagon Azure (Cobalt Blue) fimbriated of the last; on a chief embattled Vert edged Or a lightning flash of the third. Attached below the device a Green motto scroll inscribed “VALIANT WARRIORS” in Gold letters.

Symbolism[edit]

  1. The integration of various branches to form the Brigade Special Troops Battalion is symbolized by the colors oriental blue, cobalt blue, and green, which refer respectively to Military Intelligence, Chemical, and Military Police. Combat Engineer and Signal branches are recalled by the stylized fret and the lightning flash in chief.
  2. The stylized hexagon and embattled chief refer again respectively to the Chemical and Combat Engineer organizations.
  3. The black cross formy recalls the unit’s proud affiliation with the Duke Brigade.
  4. Black also denotes strength of purpose, yellow or gold signifies excellence.

Background[edit]

  • The distinctive unit insignia was approved on October 31, 2005

Flag[edit]

  • a.Size:
  1. Hoist: Three Feet.
  2. Fly: Four Feet.
  3. Fringe: 2½”
  • b.Description.
  1. The flag has a solid background with an embroidered American eagle displayed centered thereon. In its right talon the eagle holds an olive branch; in its left talon, a bundle of 13 arrows, all in proper colors.
  2. Its beak grasps a scroll inscribed with the unit motto.
  3. On the eagle’s breast is embroidered the shield of the coat of arms and the crest is above the eagle’s head.
  4. Below the eagle is a scroll inscribed with the designation of the organization.
  • c. Organizational colors:
  1. Organization: Branch Immaterial
  2. Background: Teal Blue
  3. Fringe: Yellow
  4. Letters and Numbers: Teal Blue
  5. Scrolls.
    1. Outline:Yellow
    2. Background: White

Lineage[edit]

HHC, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

  • Constituted 24 May 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 1st Expeditionary Division
  • Organized 8 June 1917 at New York, New York
  • Redesignated 6 July 1917 as Headquarters, 1st Division
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 August 1942 as Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division
  • Reorganized and redesignated 20 April 1960 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division

Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

  • Constituted 24 May 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 1st Infantry Brigade, and assigned to the 1st Expeditionary Division (later redesignated as the 1st Division)
  • Organized 8 June 1917 at New York, New York
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 April 1921 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Brigade
  • Redesignated 23 March 1925 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade
  • Redesignated 24 August 1936 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Brigade
  • Disbanded 11 October 1939 at Camp Wadsworth, New York
  • Reconstituted 1 July 1943 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Airborne Infantry Brigade.
  • Activated 6 July 1943 at Camp Meade, South Dakota
  • Disbanded 27 January 1944at Camp Mckall, North Carolina
  • Reconstituted 8 July, 1958 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Brigade
  • Activated 25 July 1958 at Fort Benning, Georgia
  • Inactivated 24 September 1962 at Fort Benning, Georgia
  • Redesignated 23 October 1963 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division
  • Activated 2 January 1964 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated 16 March 2008 as Headquarters, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division (Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division - hereafter separate lineage)
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division Reorganized and Redesignated on 16 March 2008 as follows:
  • Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division
  • Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated as Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division

Headquarters, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

  • Constituted 24 May 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 2nd Infantry Brigade, and assigned to the 1st Expeditionary Division (later redesignated as the 1st Division)
  • Organized 8 June 1917 at New York, New York
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 April 1921 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Infantry Brigade
  • Redesignated 23 March 1925 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade
  • Redesignated 24 August 1936 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Infantry Brigade
  • Relieved 11 October 1939 from assignment to the 1st Division
  • Inactivated 1 June 1940 at Fort Ontario, New York
  • Redesignated 30 June 1943 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Airborne Infantry Brigade, and activated at Camp Mackall, North Carolina
  • Disbanded 15 January 1945 in Europe
  • Reconstituted 12 February 1958 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Infantry Brigade
  • Activated 15 February 1958 at Fort Devens, Massachusetts
  • Inactivated 19 February 1962 at Fort Devens, Massachusetts
  • Redesignated 23 October 1963 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division
  • Activated 2 January 1964 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division, Reorganized and Redesignated on 16 March 2008 as follows:
  • Headquarters, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division.
  • Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated as Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division.

Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

  • Constituted 24 May 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters Troop, 1st Expeditionary Division
  • Organized 8 June 1917 at New York, New York
  • Reorganized and redesignated 6 July 1917 as Headquarters Troop, 1st Division
  • Reorganized and redesignated 13 February 1921 as Headquarters and Military Police Company (less Military Police Platoon), 1st Division
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 August 1942 as Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division
  • Disbanded 20 April 1960 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Reconstituted 23 October 1963 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division
  • Activated 2 January 1964 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Redesignated 21 July 1975 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division Forward
  • Inactivated 15 August 1991 in Germany
  • Redesignated 16 February 1996 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, and activated in Germany
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division Reorganized and Redesignated on 16 April 2007 as follows:
  • Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division
  • Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reorganized and redesignated as Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division

Headquarters, 4th Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

  • Information Pending

HHB, 1st Infantry Division Artillery[edit]

  • Constituted 24 May 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 1st Field Artillery Brigade, and assigned to the 1st Expeditionary Division
  • Partially organized in June 1917 at Washington, D.C.; organization completed in August 1917 in France
  • Disbanded 16 October 1939 at Fort Hoyle, Maryland
  • Reconstituted 10 September 1940 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1st Division Artillery
  • Activated 1 October 1940 at Madison Barracks, New York
  • Reorganized and redesignated 15 February 1957 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1st Infantry Division Artillery
  • Inactivated 15 November 1995 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Activated 16 February 1996 in Germany

HHC, Engineer Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

  • Constituted 16 October 1993 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Engineer Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, and activated at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Inactivated 15 June 1995 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Activated 16 February 1996 in Germany

Honors[edit]

HHC, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Campaign Participation Credit[edit]

  • World War I:
  1. Montdidier-Noyon;
  2. Aisne-Marne;
  3. St. Mihiel;
  4. Meuse-Argonne;
  5. Lorraine 1917;
  6. Lorraine 1918;
  7. Picardy 1918
  • World War II:
  1. Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead);
  2. Tunisia;
  3. Sicily (with arrowhead);
  4. Normandy (with arrowhead);
  5. Northern France;
  6. Rhineland;
  7. Ardennes-Alsace;
  8. Central Europe
  • Vietnam:
  1. Defense;
  2. Counteroffensive;
  3. Counteroffensive, Phase II;
  4. Counteroffensive, Phase III;
  5. Tet Counteroffensive;
  6. Counteroffensive, Phase IV;
  7. Counteroffensive, Phase V;
  8. Counteroffensive, Phase VI;
  9. Tet 69/Counteroffensive;
  10. Summer-Fall 1969;
  11. Winter-Spring 1970
  • Southwest Asia:
  1. Defense of Saudi Arabia;
  2. Liberation and Defense of Kuwait;
  3. Cease-Fire

Decorations[edit]

Unit Awards[edit]

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for:
  1. VIETNAM 1968
  2. SOUTHWEST ASIA
  • Army Superior Unit Award for 1997
  • French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II for:
  1. KASSERINE
  2. NORMANDY
  • French Croix de Guerre, World War II, Fourragere
  • Belgian Fourragere 1940
  • Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for:
  1. action at MONS
  2. action at EUPEN-MALMEDY
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1965-1968
  • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for VIETNAM 1965-1970
  • Distinguished Unit Citations: 20.

Individual Awards[edit]

  • Medal Of Honor-16 ;
  • Distinguished Service Cross-130 ;
  • Distinguished Service Medal-5 ;
  • Silver Star-6,019 ;
  • Legion Of Merit-31 ;
  • Soldiers Medal-162 ;
  • Bronze Star Medal-15,021 ;
  • Air Medal-76.

Headquarters, 2nd Brigade,1st Infantry Division and Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Campaign Participation Credit[edit]

  1. World War I:
    1. Montdidier-Noyon;
    2. Aisne-Marne;
    3. St. Mihiel;
    4. Meuse-Argonne;
    5. Lorraine 1917;
    6. Lorraine 1918;
    7. Picardy 1918
  2. World War II:
    1. Normandy
  3. Vietnam:
    1. Defense;
    2. Counteroffensive;
    3. Counteroffensive, Phase II;
    4. Counteroffensive, Phase III;
    5. Tet Counteroffensive;
    6. Counteroffensive, Phase IV;
    7. Counteroffensive, Phase V;
    8. Counteroffensive, Phase VI;
    9. Tet 69/Counteroffensive
  4. War on Terrorism:
    1. Iraq

Decorations[edit]

  1. Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered SAMARRA, IRAQ
  2. Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1969
  3. Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1996-1997
  4. Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1965-1968
  5. Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1965-1970

HHB, 1st Infantry Division Artillery[edit]

Campaign Participation Credit[edit]

  1. World War I:
    1. Montdidier-Noyon;
    2. Aisne-Marne; St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne; Lorraine 1917; Lorraine 1918; Picardy 1918
  2. World War II:
    1. Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead);
    2. Tunisia;
    3. Sicily (with arrowhead);
    4. Normandy (with arrowhead);
    5. Northern France;
    6. Rhineland;
    7. Ardennes-Alsace;
    8. Central Europe
  3. Vietnam:
    1. Defense;
    2. Counteroffensive;
    3. Counteroffensive, Phase II;
    4. Counteroffensive, Phase III;
    5. Tet Counteroffensive;
    6. Counteroffensive, Phase IV;
    7. Counteroffensive, Phase V;
    8. Counteroffensive, Phase VI;
    9. Summer-Fall 1969;
    10. Winter-Spring 1970
  4. Southwest Asia:
    1. Defense of Saudi Arabia;
    2. Liberation and Defense of Kuwait

Decorations[edit]

  • French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II for KASSERINE
  • French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II for NORMANDY
  • French Croix de Guerre, World War II, Fourragere
  • Belgian Fourragere 1940
  1. Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at MONS
  2. Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at EUPEN-MALMEDY
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1968
  • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for VIETNAM 1965-1970

HHC, Engineer Brigade, 1st Infantry Division[edit]

Campaign Credit[edit]

  • None

Decorations[edit]

  • None

Combat Chronicle[edit]

World War I[edit]

  • Overseas: Move completed 22 December 1917.
  • Casualties:
  1. Total-22,320
  2. KIA-3,730;
  3. WIA-18,590.
  • Commanders:
  1. Maj. Gen. William L. Sibert (18 June 1917)
  2. Maj. Gen. R. L. Bullard (14 December 1917)
  3. Brig. Gen. Beaumond B. Buck (5 April 1918)
  4. Maj. Gen. R. L. Bullard (13 April 1918)
  5. Maj. Gen. C. P. Summerall, II (15 July 1918)
  6. Brig. Gen. F. E. Bamford (12 October 1918)
  7. Brig. Gen. Frank Parker (18 October 1918)
  8. Maj. Gen. E. F. McGlachlin, Jr. (21 November 1918).

Returned to U. S.: September 1919.

World War II[edit]

Data[edit]

  • Overseas: 7 August 1942.
  • Days of Combat: 443.
  • Commanders:
  1. Maj. Gen. Donald Cubbison (February 1941)
  2. Maj. Gen. Terry de la Mesa Allen (2 August 1942)
  3. Maj. Gen. Clarence R. Huebner, July 1943)
  4. Maj. Gen. Clift Andrus (December 1944)
  5. Maj. Gen. Frank Milburn (August 1946).

Narrative[edit]

  • The 1st Infantry Division saw its first combat in World War II in North Africa, landing at Oran and taking part in the initial fighting, 8-10 November 1942. Elements then took part in seesaw combat at Maktar, Medjez el Bab, Kasserine Pass, Gafsa, El Guettar, Beja, and Mateur, 21 January-9 May 1943, helping secure Tunisia.
  • The First was the first ashore in the invasion of Sicily, 10 July 1943 ; it fought a series of short, fierce battles on the island's tortuous terrain. When that campaign was over, the Division returned to England to prepare for the Normandy invasion.
  • The First Division assaulted Omaha Beach on D-day, 6 June 1944, some units suffering 30 percent casualties in the first hour, and secured Formigny and Caumont in the beachhead. The Division followed up the St. Lo break-through with an attack on Marigny, 27 July 1944, and then drove across France in a continuous offensive, reaching the German border at Aachen in September. The Division laid siege to Aachen, taking the city after a direct assault, 21 October 1944. The First then attacked east of Aachen through Hurtgen Forest, driving to the Roer, and moved to a rest area 7 December for its first real rest in 6 months' combat, when the von Rundstedt offensive suddenly broke loose, 16 December.
  • The Division raced to the Ardennes, and fighting continuously from 17 December 1944 to 28 January 1945, helped blunt and turn back the German offensive. Thereupon, the Division attacked and again breached the Siegfried Line, fought across the Roer, 23 February 1945, and drove on to the Rhine, crossing at the Remagen bridgehead, 15-16 March 1945. The Division broke out of the bridgehead, took part in the encirclement of the Ruhr Pocket, captured Paderborn, pushed through the Harz Mountains, and was in Czechoslovakia, at Kinsperk, Sangerberg, and Mnichov, when the war in Europe ended.

Assignments in the ETO[1][edit]

  1. 1 November 1943: First Army.
  2. 6 November 1943: VII Corps.
  3. 2 February 1944: V Corps.
  4. 14 July 1944: First Army.
  5. 15 July 1944: VII Corps.
  6. 1 August 1944: VII Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group.
  7. 16 December 1944: V Corps.
  8. 20 December 1944: Attached, with the entire First Army, to the British 21st Army Group.
  9. 26 January 1945: XVIII (Abn) Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group.
  10. 12 February 1945: III Corps.
  11. 8 March 1945: VII Corps.
  12. 27 April 1945: VIII Corps.
  13. 30 April 1945: V Corps.
  14. 6 May 1945: Third Army, 12th Army Group.

General[edit]

  • Nicknames: The Red One; The Fighting First.
  • Slogan: No mission too difficult, no sacrifice too great, duty first.
  • Shoulder patch: Red Arabic numeral "I" on solid olive drab background.
  • Association:
Society of the First Division,
  • Publications:
  1. First; by the Division TI&E Officer: F. Guhl & Co., Frankfurt am Main, Germany; 1945. First, The Story of the 1st Infantry Division; by unit members TI&E, ETOUSA ; distributor, Society of the First Division; 1945.
  2. History of the 1st Infantry Division ("Danger Forward"); by unit historian; Albert Love Enterprises, Atlanta 2, Ga. ; 1948.

References[edit]

  1. * In these tabulations, the army and higher headquarters to which the division is assigned or attached is not repeated when the division is assigned or attached to a different corps in the same army. On 6 November 1943, for example, the 1st Infantry Division was assigned to the VII Corps which was itself assigned to First Army; on 1 August 1944, the 12th Army. Group became operational; and on 6 May 1945, the 1st Infantry Division left First Army for the first time during the operations on the Continent for reassignment to the Third Army.