1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Avogadro, Amedeo, Conte di Quaregna

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1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, Volume 3
Avogadro, Amedeo, Conte di Quaregna
See also Amedeo Avogadro on Wikipedia; and our 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica disclaimer.

AVOGADRO, AMEDEO, Conte Di Quaregna (1776-1856), Italian physicist, was born at Turin on the 9th of June 1776, and died there on the 9th of July 1856. He was for many years professor of higher physics in Turin University. He published many physical memoirs on electricity, the dilatation of liquids by heat, specific heats, capillary attraction, atomic volumes &c. as well as a treatise in 4 volumes on Fisica di corpi ponderabili (1837-1841). But he is chiefly remembered for his "Essai d'une manière de déterminer les masses relatives des molécules élémentaires des corps, et les proportions selon lesquelles elles entrent dans les combinaisons" (Journ. de Phys., 1811), in which he enunciated the hypothesis known by his name (Avogadro's rule) that under the same conditions of temperature and pressure equal volumes of all gases contain the same number of smallest particles or molecules, whether those particles consist of single atoms or are composed of two or more atoms of the same or different kinds.