1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Bacteriology

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BACTERIOLOGY. The minute organisms which are commonly called "bacteria"[1] are also known popularly under other designations, e.g. "microbes," "micro-organisms," "microphytes," "bacilli," "micrococci." All these terms, including the usual one of bacteria, are unsatisfactory; for "bacterium," "bacillus" and "micrococcus" have narrow technical meanings, and the other terms are too vague to be scientific. The most satisfactory designation is that proposed by Nägeli in 1857, namely "schizomycetes," and it is by this term that they are usually known among botanists; the less exact term, however, is also used and is retained in this article since the science is commonly known as "bacteriology." The first part of this article deals with the general scientific aspects of the subject, while a second part is concerned with the medical aspects.

Contents

I. The Study of Bacteria

II. Pathological Importance

Endnotes[edit]

1 ^  Gr. βακτήριον, Lat. bacillus, little rod or stick.