Act Awarding Leo Ryan Congressional Gold Medal

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    Signed by President Ronald Reagan.
    Statement on Signing the Bill Authorizing a Congressional Gold Medal Honoring the Late Representative Leo J. Ryan
    Note: This is the original legislation as it was initially enacted. Any subsequent amendments hosted on WS may be listed using  What Links Here.
    98TH UNITED STATES CONGRESS
    1ST SESSION


    An Act
    To honor Congressman Leo J. Ryan and to award a special congressional Gold Medal to the family of the late Honorable Leo J. Ryan.


    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
    Bill to award Congressman Ryan the Congressional Gold Medal.


    That—

    (a) the President of the United States is authorized to present, on behalf of the Congress, a gold medal of appropriate design to the family of the late Honorable Leo J. Ryan in recognition of his distinguished service as a Member of Congress and the fact of his untimely death by assassination while performing his responsibilities as a Member of the United States House of Representatives. For such purpose, the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to cause to be struck a gold medal with suitable emblems, devices, and inscriptions to be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury. There is authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $25,000 after October 1, 1983, to carry out the provisions of this subsection.
    (b) The Secretary of the Treasury may cause duplicates in bronze of such medal to be coined and sold under such regulations as he may prescribe, at a price sufficient to cover the cost thereof, including labor, material, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses, and the gold medal. The appropriation made to carry out subsection (a) shall be reimbursed out of the proceeds of such sales.
    (c) The medals provided for in this section are national medals for the purpose of section 5111 of title 31, United States Code.


    Approved November 18, 1983.


    This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).