Ante-Nicene Fathers/Volume VI/Arnobius/Adversus Gentes/Book I/Chapter XX

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Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol. VI, Adversus Gentes, Book I by Arnobius, translated by Hamilton Bryce and Hugh Campbell
Chapter XX

20. [1]Do they on this account wreak their wrath on you too, in order that, roused by your own private wounds, you may rise up for their vengeance? It seems, then, that the gods seek the help of mortals; and were they not protected by your strenuous advocacy, they are not able of themselves to repel and to avenge[2] the insults offered them. Nay rather, if it be true that they burn with anger, give them an opportunity of defending themselves, and let them put forth and make trial of their innate powers, to take vengeance for their offended dignity. By heat, by hurtful cold, by noxious winds, by the most occult diseases, they can slay us, they can consume[3] us, and they can drive us entirely from all intercourse with men; or if it is impolitic to assail us by violence, let them give forth some token of their indignation,[4] by which it may be clear to all that we live under heaven subject to their strong displeasure.


Footnotes[edit]

  1. The ms. reads at, “but.”
  2. Defendere is added in the ms., but marked as a gloss.
  3. Consumere is in like manner marked as a gloss.
  4. So Orelli, for the ms. judicationis, “judgment.”