British North America Act, 1965

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
British North America Act, 1965
Renamed the Constitution Act, 1965 in 1982, this legislation was introduced by the government of Lester Pearson and instituted a mandatory retirement age of 75 for all persons appointed to the Canadian Senate. Those appointed prior to the passage of the Act were exempt.

Excerpted from British North America Acts on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Contents[edit]

British North America Act, 1965

1. Amendment as to legislation respecting the term of office for Senators.
2. Short title and citation of Part I.




14 Elizabeth II, c. 4 (Canada)


An Act to make provision for the retirement of members of the Senate


[Assented to 2nd June, 1965.]


Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons of Canada, enacts as follows:

I. Amendments to the British North America Act, 1867

Amendment as to legislation respecting the term of office for Senators
1. Section 29 of the British North America Act, 1867 is repealed and the following substituted therefor:


Tenure of place in Senate
29.(1) Subject to subsection (2), a Senator shall, subject to the provisions of this Act, hold his place in the Senate for life.
(2) A Senator who is summoned to the Senate after the coming into force of this subsection shall, subject to this Act, hold his place in the Senate until he attains the age of seventy-five years.
Short title and citation of Part I
2. This Part may be cited as the British North America Act, 1965, and the British North America Acts, 1867 to 1964, and this Part may be cited together as the British North America Acts, 1867 to 1965.

.   .   .



This document is reproduced under the terms of the Reproduction of Federal Law Order for enactments of the Government of Canada. This document is not an official version, and is not endorsed by the Government of Canada.
Nuvola apps important.svg
Canadian legislation is under Crown Copyright pursuant to Section 12 of the Copyright Act for 50 years after the year of first publication. That section and the lack of modern case law make it unclear whether these documents remain protected by perpetual Crown rights and privileges after that term ends.