California Proposition 64 (1986)

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California Proposition 64 (1986)  (1986) 
by Prevent AIDS Now Initiative Committee
California Proposition 64 (1986), submitted by the Prevent AIDS Now Initiative Committee (PANIC). The proposition was defeated, then reintroduced in 1988 as Proposition 69, which was also defeated.

Official ballot summary[edit]

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Initiative statute.

Declares that AIDS is an infectious, contagious and communicable disease and that the condition of being a carrier of the HTLV-III virus is an infectious, contagious and communicable condition. Requires both be placed on the list of reportable diseases and conditions maintained by the director of the Department of Health Services. Provides that both are subject to quarantine and isolation statutes and regulations. Provides that Department of Health Services personnel and all health officers shall fulfill the duties and obligations set forth in specified statutory provisions to preserve the public health from AIDS. [1]


Text[edit]

Section 1[edit]

The purpose of this Act is to:

  • A. Enforce and confirm the declaration of the California Legislature set forth in Health and Safety Code Section 195 that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is serious and life threatening to men and women from all segments of society, that AIDS is usually lethal and that it is caused by an infectious agent with a high concentration of cases in California;
  • B. Protect victims of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), members of their families and local communities, and the public health at large; and
  • C. Utilize the existing structure of the State Department of Health Services and local health officers and the statutes and regulations under which they serve to preserve the public health from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

Section 2[edit]

Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an infectious, contagious and communicable disease and the condition of being a carrier of the HTLV nhIII virus is an infectious, contagious and communicable condition and both shall be placed and maintained by the director of the Department of Health Services on the list of reportable diseases and conditions mandated by Health and Safety Code Section 3123, and both shall be included within the provisions of Division 4 of such code and the rules and regulations set forth in Administrative Code Title 17, Part 1, Chapter 4, Subchapter 1, and all personnel of the Department of Health Services and all health officers shall fulfill all of the duties and obligations specified in each and all of the sections of said statutory division and administrative code subchapter in a manner consistent with the intent of this Act, as shall all other persons identified in said provisions.

Section 3[edit]

In the event that any section, subsection or portion thereof of this Act is deemed unconstitutional by a proper court of law, then that section, subsection and portions thereof shall be stricken from the Act and all other sections, subsections and portions thereof shall remain in force, alterable only by the people, according to process.


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